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Hierarchy - LE Style

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  • Hierarchy - LE Style

    In the city I live in we have State Police, City Police, Sheriff Deputies and College Campus Police. In the city I see all the agencies patrolling, pulling people over, etc. In the county I only see Deputies and Troopers. I think they all have county wide jurisdiction, but am not positive. My question is... does one agency have greater "power" then another? If a City Officer pulls over someone in the campus district, do they have to notify the Campus Police to take over? Do the Deputies hand off issues to the City Police? What's the hierarchy, if there even is one?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by TeachMe; 04-11-2011, 01:00 AM. Reason: spelling correction
    When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left, and could say, "I used everything you gave me."

  • #2
    I can only speak for here in Tennessee. But all equal the same in respect to their jurisdiction. If a State Trooper stops a car on a road that runs through a college campus he has every right to conduct his business as usual without notifying campus PD.
    Where'd you learn that, Cheech? Drug school?

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    • #3
      Teach Me, I know I'm far from one of your favorite people but for Alabama. Troopers of the Alabama Dept of Public Safety exercise state wide authority. That includes in all sixty seven counties, state supported colleges and universities,and within all incorporated cities and towns.Sheriffs and their Deputies exercise jurisdiction in their respective counties to include the venues I previously mentioned. Their primary focus is within the unincorporated areas of the county. City Police exercise jurisdiction within their respective municipalities, although by law a city officer (Alabama) has arrest powers in the county in which his city is located. State supported universities and colleges also employ Campus Police Officers. These Officers have full arrest powers and authority on the campus(s) of the particular college or university. State Game Wardens and in Alabama, officers of the Marine Police also enjoy statewide authority and jurisdiction. I don't know if there is a "hierarchy" per se, but a Sheriff is recognized by law as the chief law enforcement officer of a given county. Does that mean he/she gives orders to a Police Chief? Rarely, if ever. However, a Sheriff is bound by law to provide police services to a municipality which cannot/will not provide mandated services. Conversely, the Alabama Dept of Public Safety, on order of the Governor will provide law enforcement services to a county or city unable or unwilling to provide such services. Understand that these situations are indeed rare. The Alabama Dept of Public Safety routinely provides investigative and technical services to local jurisdictions which due to small size and/or lack of funds cannot properly provide these services. The reply I've given you is applicable to Alabama, and fairly typical in other states with some exceptions. The exceptions would apply mostly to the New England area.

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      • #4
        In California, all police officers have authority anywhere in the state. However, the reality is that each department is funded for a specific purpose. For example, the people of a given city pay taxes for their police department to provide service to them alone. The people in the unincorporated parts of a county pay taxes for the sheriffs department to provide police services to them alone. Everyone in California pays vehicle license fees for the Highway patrol to enforce traffic laws on state highways, to provide for the security of the governor and elected state officials, and to protect state property.

        With this in mind, no one is going to expend a significant amount of their budget handling matters that are outside their area of primary responsibility. If an officer happens across something outside their area of primary responsibility that requires immediate attention, they will probably take appropriate action such as writing a citation. However, if a serious matter is going to require a significant expenditure of resources or formal investigation, most likely they will only do what is necessary to stabilize the situation until the appropriate agency can respond and assume responsibility.
        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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        • #5
          Can't say it any better than L-1

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          • #6
            Plus, if at all possible, some officers will usually try to punt it if they can (especially close to quitting time) to whoever they can. "Aint ours, this is the city/county/state/transit/sheriff/natural resources/airport authority/park police". Unfortunately my department cant go 10-6 like the state and municipal agencies can, so we get stuck with it.
            Errare humanum est, sed perseverare diabolicum
            To err is human, but to persist is diabolical

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            • #7
              Kentucky is kind of an oddball in that regard unless they've changed since the early 2000s. As you probably know, Kentucky divides cities into classes. Class 1 is the biggest city and class 6 is the smallest. When I lived there Louisville was the only Class 1 city, Frankfort was a Class 2, etc. Your sworn powers stay with you whenever you are in your own city or any city that is numerically higher than yours. Basically a Louisville Metro officer would have authority in any city in the state, an officer from Corbin would only have authority in other Class 6 cities.

              Indiana is signficantly simpler, and any government employee officer (not private like some campus/rr officers) has statewide authority. That said, you try to let the "specialty" officer take care of it. If something happened on the campus, you try to let the campus police take care of it, etc. If there's an emergency or no available "specialty" officer anyone can take care of whatever it is.
              I miss you, Dave.
              http://www.odmp.org/officer/20669-of...david-s.-moore

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              • #8
                In Iowa a city officer has jurisdiction in the town that hired them. Most towns have mutual aid agreements with the counties they are in so that they can assist deputies if necessary.
                They also usually have mutual aid agreements with the other towns in the area. These agreements are used heavily.

                A deputy sheriff has jurisdiction in the county that hired them. The entire county-----including the city/town/villiages inside the county. They also have mutual aid agreements with the surrounding counties so they can assist them if/when necessissary.

                Several State agencies have statewide police powers.

                The Iowa Department of Public Safety (State Troopers, Investigators, Fire Marsha, Narcotics Investigatorsl)
                Iowa Department of Natural Resources Enforcement
                Iowa Department of Transportation Enforcement


                As far as hierarchy, there really isn't any.

                A sheriff is known as the "Chief LEO" in the county but exercises no authority over the chief of police (or any officers) of a city/town agency.

                A trooper often assists with operations of smaller agencies and when not helping out------works traffic on the state highways. A deputy normally patrols the unincorporated county areas, but they are not obligated to ignore violations they come across when driving through a city/town.
                Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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                • #9
                  Just sounds like a matter of concurrent jurisdiction. As a matter of law, one agency is not required to let another agency know about what is going on. Depending on the circumstance, it is the wise thing to do.

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                  • #10
                    PD=within city limits
                    SO=outside of city limits, but the city is in the County, so everywhere and anywhere
                    State=anywhere they want.

                    We dont take city calls and city doesnt take county calls. First thing we ask is where did the offense occur, if it occurred in the city, we refer them to contact PD.
                    "Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called Sons of God - Matthew 5:9

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                    • #11
                      At the campus PD that I am at we are primarily intended for campus enforcement (in this case the campus has its own zip code and is technically considered its own "city"). However, we are also deputized by the county, so we have county-wide authority.

                      That said, we rarely (read almost never) conduct regular business outside of the campus due the fact that we are funded and intended to patrol the campus as L-1 stated. That doesn't mean that we cant should something unusual happen... it is understood in this county that the city handles city business, the county handles county business and the campus handles campus business. There is not much intermingling aside from occasional backing up each other when help is not immediately available (typically only when something is occurring on a county/city or city/campus border).

                      Investigations on campus are a little different though, they can extend off campus but then again campus PD is only involved if the offense occurred on campus or is related to campus in some manner.

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                      • #12
                        Thanks Guys for all the answers. The answers, of course, lead me to more questions.

                        First - Last year on a "tour" of the jail, I asked the deputy when did he patrol the streets and he replied, "Never, I am a jail deputy". I took that to mean there are two classes. if you will, of deputies, the ones that work the jail/courthouses and the road deputies. Are they all one in the same, training wise, can they switch from duty to duty? I would have asked, but questions from me were discouraged. Is the jailer (an elected position) a former deputy?
                        When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left, and could say, "I used everything you gave me."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TeachMe View Post
                          Thanks Guys for all the answers. The answers, of course, lead me to more questions.

                          First - Last year on a "tour" of the jail, I asked the deputy when did he patrol the streets and he replied, "Never, I am a jail deputy". I took that to mean there are two classes. if you will, of deputies, the ones that work the jail/courthouses and the road deputies. Are they all one in the same, training wise, can they switch from duty to duty? I would have asked, but questions from me were discouraged. Is the jailer (an elected position) a former deputy?
                          Most sheriff's departments who run jails hire primarily deputies to run the jails. The road deputies are usually picked from the jail deputies. I started out life as a jailer / dispatcher.

                          Also, keep in mind a deputy serves at the whim of the sheriff. If a new sheriff is elected, you might not have a job anymore. Real comforting huh?
                          Last edited by OneAdam12; 04-14-2011, 12:54 AM.
                          Pete Malloy, "The only thing black and white about this job is the car."

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TeachMe View Post
                            I took that to mean there are two classes. if you will, of deputies, the ones that work the jail/courthouses and the road deputies. Are they all one in the same, training wise, can they switch from duty to duty?
                            As you've already seen, the answer will likely vary from area to area. Here the jail deputies are trained to be jail deputies and do not go through the full ILEA training course that "road" deputies go through. However we no longer have road deputies in our county since they merged the city police and sheriff's road patrol.
                            I miss you, Dave.
                            http://www.odmp.org/officer/20669-of...david-s.-moore

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by TeachMe View Post
                              First - Last year on a "tour" of the jail, I asked the deputy when did he patrol the streets and he replied, "Never, I am a jail deputy". I took that to mean there are two classes. if you will, of deputies, the ones that work the jail/courthouses and the road deputies. Are they all one in the same, training wise, can they switch from duty to duty? I would have asked, but questions from me were discouraged. Is the jailer (an elected position) a former deputy?
                              Varies greatly by the area of the country. In my states (Missouri and Kansas), for the most part deputies will start in the jail and move to the streets in 2-5 years. There are Sheriff offices that will hire people to work specifically in the jail, but they are somewhat rare in these parts. Just depends on how the sheriff wants to run his department.

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