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  • wyofirebirdbaby
    replied
    Well I feel better knowing that breaking down doors is fun and not a real bother. My main concern is for the lone officer who always shows up at the 9-1-1 calls before emergency people get there! And I realize trauma was not the right word to use. Bother would have been better but if it's not a real big deal then maybe I should let them have a little fun,huh? LOL! My home insurance would cover the doors!

    Leave a comment:


  • SRT936
    replied
    Originally posted by RaucousSilence View Post
    Around here, no one has latex gloves anymore. Actually, I haven't seen a latex glove out in the field in several years. Nitrile is the rule of the road, and has been for several years. The only latex gloves I've seen in that time are sterile ones in the ER and at training classes.
    +1. I haven't seen a latex glove in probably 10 years.


    Originally posted by Iowa #1603 View Post
    Not necessarily............................

    More likely they will have a woody because they got to take a door down.........
    There is nothing cops and fire fighters love more than booting a door.

    Leave a comment:


  • Iowa #1603
    replied
    Originally posted by ateamer View Post
    Trauma? No fireman is going to have trauma because they had to break a door down. It'll be out of their mind by the time they get back to the station.
    Not necessarily............................

    More likely they will have a woody because they got to take a door down.........

    Leave a comment:


  • RaucousSilence
    replied
    Originally posted by wyofirebirdbaby View Post
    ...one of them is latex gloves and it's a severe reaction when contact is made and that's on the back of the bracelet but if bracelet isn't seen the gloves have already made contact with my skin....
    Around here, no one has latex gloves anymore. Actually, I haven't seen a latex glove out in the field in several years. Nitrile is the rule of the road, and has been for several years. The only latex gloves I've seen in that time are sterile ones in the ER and at training classes.

    Leave a comment:


  • oneoldcop
    replied
    Could always have it tattooed on your forehead...

    Leave a comment:


  • cgravines
    replied
    Yea, nobody is gonna be traumatized because that had to break down your door. More likely they will think it was fun. When I was in door breaching class, it was a ball.

    Leave a comment:


  • deputy x 2
    replied
    ^^^

    Legalized vandalism!

    Ever see them peel open a roof with that hook?

    If it makes you feel better Wyofirebirdbaby.....they will fix the door...all you have to do is put in a claim.

    Leave a comment:


  • ateamer
    replied
    Trauma? No fireman is going to have trauma because they had to break a door down. It'll be out of their mind by the time they get back to the station.

    Leave a comment:


  • wyofirebirdbaby
    replied
    Originally posted by Zeitgeist View Post
    +1
    In a medical emergency, I promise, paramedics and firefighters will get in.
    I have no doubt about that as they're trained to do so but I really hate to cause them all that trauma and chaos when I can fairly easily see to it that I'm responsible enough about my illness and situation to have an emergency situation covered! Kind of like knowing all your exits and what to do should your smoke alarms' shrieking awaken you at 3:30 a.m.! LE and the EMTs will have enough on their hands to do without my causing more problems due to pure ignorance and lack of caring about what others have to do to "help" me get to the ER!

    My depending 100% on them coming to my aid in just minutes deserves that much effort on my part also! (There's also a little bit of selfishness on my part in this deal as I want to live,not die and the time it takes to break down 3 doors could make that difference and it'd only be my fault if it happened!)

    Leave a comment:


  • wyofirebirdbaby
    replied
    Originally posted by deputy x 2 View Post
    Medical bracelets- good idea. A generic one is the best as EMT's aren't going to look behind every piece of fancy looking bracelet. EMT's do a quick check and are "trained" to spot them.

    Use a Sharpie or label maker on the back of your DL. FD and EMT have to fill out pre hospital reports so they will be looking for your ID.

    A lock box is the best...however moving it periodically is a bad idea. Dispatch can input your access code in the computer for reference. That is how they do it for apartment gates and doors.

    Life Alert is a good sense of security....at least they can speak for you.

    But really in a dire situation..one they are just going to break down your door. FD has "special" keys! And two..allergic reaction to latex gloves is secondary to your primary illness...which can be deadly if not attended to.
    What an excellent idea on the sharpie and my DL! In my wallet they'll see my DL before they will the medical card. (Going to get a new wallet,too.)

    If dispatch has the code then no need to move box.

    Yes,I believe Life Alert is something I need. I get dizzy a lot and tend to fall more often than I'm comfortable with. (Last time one of my stupid cats ran off with my glasses when I fell! It was funny later!)

    I not only want to stay independent and safe as long as possible but I don't want to bother LE and EMTs needlessly or more than absolutely necessary! I never was a boy scout (LOL!) but the motto "Be prepared" is a pretty good one for everybody.

    Yes,a big healthy dose of Benadryl administered quickly with the allergic reaction to latex works very well while it takes a little more to get me breathing normal again.

    You too, had excellent ideas and I will use them also. Thank you,deputy x 2!

    Leave a comment:


  • Zeitgeist
    replied
    Originally posted by deputy x 2 View Post
    Medical bracelets- good idea. A generic one is the best as EMT's aren't going to look behind every piece of fancy looking bracelet. EMT's do a quick check and are "trained" to spot them.

    Use a Sharpie or label maker on the back of your DL. FD and EMT have to fill out pre hospital reports so they will be looking for your ID.

    But really in a dire situation..one they are just going to break down your door. FD has "special" keys! And two..allergic reaction to latex gloves is secondary to your primary illness...which can be deadly if not attended to.
    +1
    In a medical emergency, I promise, paramedics and firefighters will get in.

    Leave a comment:


  • deputy x 2
    replied
    Medical bracelets- good idea. A generic one is the best as EMT's aren't going to look behind every piece of fancy looking bracelet. EMT's do a quick check and are "trained" to spot them.

    Use a Sharpie or label maker on the back of your DL. FD and EMT have to fill out pre hospital reports so they will be looking for your ID.

    A lock box is the best...however moving it periodically is a bad idea. Dispatch can input your access code in the computer for reference. That is how they do it for apartment gates and doors.

    Life Alert is a good sense of security....at least they can speak for you.

    But really in a dire situation..one they are just going to break down your door. FD has "special" keys! And two..allergic reaction to latex gloves is secondary to your primary illness...which can be deadly if not attended to.

    Leave a comment:


  • wyofirebirdbaby
    replied
    Originally posted by Nikk View Post
    http://www.vitalid.ca/store/Scripts/...p?idProduct=16

    One quick search I found this non-metal medic alert bracelet. I'm sure there are more stylish plastic ones!
    Now see,when I googled them and looked at numerous sites I never saw that one! And I paid more for this one! I'm going to order one of those and when I feel like being "girly" I'll wear this one! Oh yeah,I'm NOT allergic to surgical steel!

    Thank you so much,Nikk! You've helped me immensely! I'm eternally grateful!

    Leave a comment:


  • Nikk
    replied
    Originally posted by wyofirebirdbaby View Post
    I'll bet they have that same service here with our dispatchers and I'll go Monday in person and talk to the one on duty. Even if I'm unable to speak I'll bet I could still text as long as we're all knowed up on how to text 9-1-1! Keys could even be stashed outside and moved every few days as a single location may be easier to text than a sequence of numbers. From experience I tend to freak out a little when I'm unable to breathe and a sequence of numbers may be too much for me to remember when in panic mode "In BBQ" may be easier.
    My combo (where my spare key is kept) is actually letters, not numbers, and the combo spells a word. When I give it to someone I say "the combo is BIRD" and when they see it, they figure out what I meant! (that's not really it, , of course! lol) If it's a number keypad you can usually set the code to be your birth date, wedding date, etc. - numbers you'd always remember. I've used my race car number, repeated twice! It seems in the heat of the moment that would be easier to remember than where you last stashed your secret key! But again - my key lock box was not obtained by me for the same purpose as yours, so your local responders having the code would be more suited to your situation.
    Last edited by Nikk; 03-20-2011, 10:07 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • wyofirebirdbaby
    replied
    Originally posted by cgravines View Post
    Lock problem- I'd suggest possibly getting one of those punch key boxes that Realtors use or something more fancy and a coded entry on your garage or something of the like. My county dispatch has premise information with contact numbers and sometimes key code entry to premises.

    Latex gloves- I'd say short of everybody in the area knowing you, you're gonna come in contact with the gloves unless the standard gloves your first responders use are non latex. We take serious the phrase, "Scene safe, gloves on" before we give any treatment to anybody.

    Medical Alert- short of knowing exactly what you're allergic to, I can't offer specific advice. I have a watch with a nylon strap that completely surrounds my wrist. In place of the time piece you could have a dog tag style alert with your information. I'm not sure if they make this but a quick google search for medical alert offered me tons of options so I'm sure you could talk to someone that could offer you assistance somewhere. Similar to our premise information for buildings, we have alerts for people in our dispatch information. If you are the one calling 911 before you are completely incapacitated, when they put your name in the system your information history will come up. They'll also offer medical history to us as we are enroute.
    See,I knew that answers would come and be good ones as long as they didn't come from me! Punch key boxes are one good suggestion.

    The one ambulance ride I've ever had didn't involve my medical condition so I was able to immediately inform EMTs of latex allergy and they had non-latex gloves handy and available but that may not always be the case.

    I'm allergic to gold,silver,brass,copper and some forms of aluminum. I'm able to wear rings on my fingers and earrings as long as they don't touch my neck in any way! Odd,huh? Leather,nylon,plastic and cloth are all fine. I've never been able to wear a bracelet or watch in my life time and missed what all the other girls and women could wear so much that I finally had a wrist band tattooed on my left wrist!

    I'll bet they have that same service here with our dispatchers and I'll go Monday in person and talk to the one on duty. Even if I'm unable to speak I'll bet I could still text as long as we're all knowed up on how to text 9-1-1! Keys could even be stashed outside and moved every few days as a single location may be easier to text than a sequence of numbers. From experience I tend to freak out a little when I'm unable to breathe and a sequence of numbers may be too much for me to remember when in panic mode "In BBQ" may be easier.

    I believe I will check with our hospital first about the medic alert option best fitted for my situation and then to dispatch.

    Thank you so VERY much for the suggestions! Not ones I'd thought of! I truly feel much better now!

    Leave a comment:

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