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Stopping a Diabetic

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  • Stopping a Diabetic

    About two weeks ago on a Saturday night, I was coming home from another town, late at night. A trooper coming in the other direction flips a U-turn and starts coming my way. I am in the left lane, so I move to the right so he can go by, I figured he had somewhere to go and I wanted to get out of his way. When I changed lanes, I forgot to signal and he nails me. I pull in a parking lot and the trooper asks for my DL, I open my wallet to get it and the trooper sees the loaded capped syringe I keep in my wallet next to my check writing pen . It fits in there nicely and I don't have to worry about it rolling around in my purse.

    The trooper starts yelling at me to close my wallet, throw it out the window, he kicks it away with his foot, draws his gun and orders me out of the car. Seriously, I am about to pee my pants. I am a 43yr old school teacher with Type 1 diabetes. I carry syringes with me everywhere, but usually not my insulin since it needs to stay cold. I usually load a syringe if I am going out in case I need a shot. The trooper put on his gloves, opened my wallet, dumped the loaded syringe on the ground and asked "What the hell is that?" I told him I am a diabetic and that is my insulin. He didn't believe me. He is rolling this syringe around on the ground with his foot and all I can think is, when this is all over, I am going to really need that shot.

    The trooper picks up my syringe and tells me he thinks it looks like heroin. I tell him it's not, it is insulin and I am going to need that. I have no proof that I am diabetic, my insulin is at home. He calls another trooper and when the other trooper gets there I am searched, my car is searched, my purse is searched which turns up three other empty syringes. (I take my used needles home to clip the tips and dispose of them.) The second trooper seems to know a bit more about diabetics, and asks me what kind of insulin I take and what my last A1c score was. Only a diabetic would know what an A1c score is...lol. I think my answers convinced him that I was being truthful. The second trooper pulls the first trooper aside and they talk for a bit, before first trooper tells me to get my DL out of my wallet, wants insurance and reg information. No ticket was given, just a verbal warning to use my directionals (I had never heard that term before, so at least I learned something). I ask for my insulin back, and trooper one tells me he is going to keep it. I am shocked. Insulin is so very expensive, $185 a vile, and I go through a vile in less then two weeks, 5+ shots a day, and my lovely new insurance won't cover it because diabetes is a "pre-existing condition".

    But anyway, I digress, back to my questions. I would like to know what kind of training officers receive about diabetes? Insulin? Why did the trooper react the way he did? What did I do wrong, besides attracting his attention in the first place? Next time I get pulled over would it be a good idea to tell the officer immediately that I am diabetic and have a syringe in my wallet? I don't ever want to have a gun pulled on me again, and I hate that the trooper felt the need to do that. Thanks so much for any insight you may have.
    When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left, and could say, "I used everything you gave me."

  • #2
    I would like to know what kind of training officers receive about diabetes?

    All department have training and it varies from department to department. We are trained for diabetics and the supplies that they carry.

    Why did the trooper react the way he did?

    That is not for us to determine, I for one don't care how he reacted as I was not there and I won't armchair general another officers actions.

    When we pull you over we don't know whether your a school teacher or a school teacher that murdered a student.

    What did I do wrong, besides attracting his attention in the first place?

    You broke the law by failing to signal.

    Every time a law enforcement officer meets an individual they must assume that that individual is dangerous. The syringe full of an unknown liquid on a late Saturday night throws up red flags for police officers. By the way that syringe is a weapon.

    Next time I get pulled over would it be a good idea to tell the officer immediately that I am diabetic and have a syringe in my wallet?

    Not that any one was at fault, but my suggestion would be to acquire a medical bracelet or necklace with the proper diabetic information on it. That alone may have prevented some of these circumstances.
    Last edited by ummone; 03-10-2011, 01:50 AM.
    This is for all you parents that like to put your kids names on the back of your mini-vans.

    STOP IT! There are predators that will use that information against them!

    Comment


    • #3
      It's "vial."

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, from your telling of the story, it sounds like the trooper went a little overboard with the gun and all. But hey, maybe you did something else to arouse his suspicions and are just conveniently leaving that out.

        Being a diabetic myself, I can't wait for the opportunity to make a perp look stupid after I find syringes on em and they try to tell me they are diabetic. "What kind of insulin are you on?" "Um, um, um, I'm Diabetic" *click click*

        Here's an idea, get your DL out of your wallet BEFORE the trooper gets to your window. Problem solved.

        Comment


        • #5
          Look at it from our point of view - loaded syringe without proof of anything..... We see this all the time with all types of meds. Illegal use never has proof. We certainly cannot tell insulin from looks alone, but any diabetic I have dealt with in the roadside carries an insulated pack with an ice pack for the insulin and a test kit. Either would have helped you. Like Ummone said - a syringe, especially a loaded one in a location easily grabbed and easy for us to miss, is a weapon. Inject me with unknown stuff and you get injected with lead.

          Carry proof of your meds and condition.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by IndianaGuy
            post removed by moderator

            You are not a cop so you should not be replying in Ask A Cop

            If you were a cop you would understand why we normally don't second guess the trained LEO who was on scene at the time of the incident.
            Last edited by Ocommod1; 03-10-2011, 11:36 AM. Reason: removed quote of deleted post
            Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

            My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by IndianaGuy
              post removed by moderator

              IndianaGuy
              Were you there?
              Last edited by Ocommod1; 03-10-2011, 11:37 AM. Reason: removed quote of deleted post
              It's not the will to win that matters...everyone has that. It's the will to prepare to win that matters.
              Paul "Bear" Bryant

              Comment


              • #8
                I do not understand for the life of me why people that have medical conditions do not wear some type of identification...
                It's not the will to win that matters...everyone has that. It's the will to prepare to win that matters.
                Paul "Bear" Bryant

                Comment


                • #9
                  Irregardless of anything else, get a dang bracelet that indicates your medical condition. It could very well save your life. If you slip into a diabetic coma or have any other bad reactions due to your condition it will really give responding medics a heads up on whats wrong with you.
                  Today's Quote:

                  "The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits."
                  Albert Einstein

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    At the very least, if you are going to carry just the syringe filled with insulin, maybe carry an empty vial or something that has your prescription on it with you to show the officer and help back your claim.
                    “Every society gets the kind of criminal it deserves. What is equally true is that every community gets the kind of law enforcement it insists on.” - Robert F. Kennedy.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Plus, to be honest with you, it makes no sense to carry around a syringe loaded with insulin anyway.... the chances of it getting knocked around and the plunger getting pushed in (and therefore wasting insulin) is too great. If you were really worried about the cost of your insulin, you would leave it in the vial it comes in and keep the syringe unloaded until you need it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have a question for the OP. Why not wear a Medical ID bracelet? Can't guarantee it would have worked 100% in the situation you referenced, but I honestly feel the outcome would have been far different. Past that, I'm not prepared to second guess, critique, or Monday Morning Quarter Back the actions of another Officer. I was not there, and I don't have access to his/her version of events. The Trooper too, has a version of events, and fairness would demand I (we) hear that before making any decision as to the propriety of his actions. Since that won't happen on this forum, I will give the Trooper the benefit of any doubt relative to the encounter. In the event you feel the Officer's action were improper, you have the option of making an official complaint with his Agency.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm type II but use insulin. It's a bit of a pain, but I toss my cooler and insulin in the car whenever I leave the house. I also use pen syringes which are hard to mistake for something that can be misued. Do they make pen syringes for Type I insulin?
                          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by vfm208 View Post
                            Plus, to be honest with you, it makes no sense to carry around a syringe loaded with insulin anyway.... the chances of it getting knocked around and the plunger getting pushed in (and therefore wasting insulin) is too great. If you were really worried about the cost of your insulin, you would leave it in the vial it comes in and keep the syringe unloaded until you need it.
                            +1. There's something fishy here.

                            I'm having trouble wrapping my head around $185 a vial for insulin. Is it some kind of new experimental insulin or are you just getting robbed by your supplier? N, R, and 70/30's run between $60 and $85 a vial depending on where you buy them.

                            Further, why do you need to store your insulin in the fridge? Since you say you're going through a vial every two weeks, you are WELL within the room temperature storage guidelines for insulin. Unless of course it is some kind of new experimental insulin that must be refrigerated. But if that's the case, why would you risk you're health by carrying around a loaded syringe in a non-refrigerated manner?

                            I'm not sold on your story. Maybe its just because I'm a skeptic at heart, but something isn't adding up.
                            Originally posted by kontemplerande
                            Without Germany, you would not have won World War 2.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              how about keeping a kit in a seperate container in your purse? there are MANY that will hold the glucometer, test strips, meds etc all in one handy container. if, and i have, see/seen a rig in a wallet my first thought is 1, youre a doper, 2 youre infected with some cooties i dont want. a loaded rig in a wallet makes no sense to me...

                              I'm not sold on your story. Maybe its just because I'm a skeptic at heart, but something isn't adding up.
                              +1
                              Originally posted by crass cop
                              Just do it in front of a camera and try not to get a boner and you shoudl be fine.

                              Comment

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