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Old Font Styles on Indictments

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  • Old Font Styles on Indictments

    I was wondering if anybody here could shine some light as I'm not sure if this is the best place (maybe a lawyer forum?) but I figure law enforcement officers might know and certain departments might actually also still use.

    My main question is why are indictments (or certain reports) still printed as if it came off a old typewriter? Its not even just the font (courier font type) but letters are not cleanly horizontal placed, as if certain parts of the letters are lower then others and the 'underline' is not straight. Even the spacing and margins are largely spaced out. Perhaps certain police reports also still use this old font and style?

    I've attached a 90 page federal indictment regarding charges to the carpenter's union (from the NYTimes) announced today as an example.

    http://graphics8.nytimes.com/package...INDICTMENT.pdf

    Come to think of it, it actually looks like it was typed on a typewriter and scanned in. Either way, it looks like it could have been typed up anytime in the 20th century before computers were around IMO.

    Is it possibly to keep up that mystique with the old reports and files from days gone by where typewriters were only used (times of Sherlock Holmes, Al Capone, JFK)? For consistency? Seems to make it more objective? Maybe they have been to lazy to change the style, layout, etc?

    Even if many of you do not know, or care, it would be interesting to hear an Officer's perspective, experience on it. Maybe some here have thought of the same regarding this question.

  • #2
    sgddfgsdgsgsdgsdg
    Last edited by Nobody; 08-07-2009, 03:32 PM.

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    • #3
      My guess would be formatting. Everyone is used to seeing certain things in a certain way. If they change the font to Times Roman for example, they would then have to play with the formatting to make sure everything appears on the paper where it's always been.

      Most of the forms and such on computer are the same forms that used to be, well...forms. So when adapted to the computer, it is natural to try to make them look the same as when they were paper fill in forms.
      “Every society gets the kind of criminal it deserves. What is equally true is that every community gets the kind of law enforcement it insists on.” - Robert F. Kennedy.

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      • #4
        If memory serves me correctly, the courts mandate that documents generated by them and by counsel must be of a specific type font, size, spacing and margins. I believe the degraded quality you are seeing comes from making copies of copies and then scanning them into a computer

        I remember a matter years back where a court limited the number of pages counsel could use in filing certain motions. They even held one law firm in contempt when they reduced their type size by 1/2 point below the required standard in order to squeeze all the desired information into their motion and stay within the page limit.
        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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        • #5
          There was a major upset in the Federal system when they changed from legal sized paper to 81/2 X 11. It saved the G lots of money, as we could all buy standard cabinets, folders, etc.

          It just like some courts that still have the bailiff say:"Oyea, Oyea, draw nigh and pay heed, Federal Court for the ____ district of ____ is now in session, the Honorable Judge XXXXX presiding.

          Tradition
          "A man who has nothing which he cares about more than he does about his personal safety is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the existing of better men than himself."
          John Stuart Mill

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Sleuth View Post
            There was a major upset in the Federal system when they changed from legal sized paper to 81/2 X 11. It saved the G lots of money, as we could all buy standard cabinets, folders, etc.

            It just like some courts that still have the bailiff say:"Oyea, Oyea, draw nigh and pay heed, Federal Court for the ____ district of ____ is now in session, the Honorable Judge XXXXX presiding.

            Tradition
            Oyez (pronounced /ˈoʊjɛs/ (with an ess sound), sometimes /ˈoʊjeɪ/) is a traditional interjection said three times in succession to introduce the opening of a court of law.

            Until the 18th century, speaking English in an English court of law was not required and one could instead use Law French, a form of French that evolved after the Norman Conquest, when Anglo-Norman became the language of the upper classes in England.

            Oyez descends from the Anglo-Norman oyez, the plural imperative form of oyer, from French ouïr, "to hear"; thus oyez means "hear ye" and was used as a call for silence and attention. It would have been common in medieval England, but it was recorded up until Middle English.

            The term is still in use by the Supreme Court of the United States. At the beginning of each session, the marshal of the Court (Court Crier) announces: "Oyez! Oyez! Oyez! All persons having business before the Honorable, the Supreme Court of the United States, are admonished to draw near and give their attention, for the Court is now sitting. God save the United States and this Honorable Court!" [1]

            The phrase is also still in use in courtrooms in North Carolina, where bailiffs, at the opening of a court session, call the public to order using a pronunciation that sounds like the words "oh yes oh yes oh yes."

            The interjection is also traditionally used by town criers to attract the attention of the public to public proclamations.

            Tell me you could not have some fun with that one
            It could be that the purpose of your life is only to serve as a warning to others.

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            • #7
              The things you learn on the net!
              "A man who has nothing which he cares about more than he does about his personal safety is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the existing of better men than himself."
              John Stuart Mill

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