Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A good Officer begins with a good FTO...

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • A good Officer begins with a good FTO...

    With that said, I have a few questions.

    I currently am a CO with the hopes of becoming a Police Officer one day...My FTO training as a CO consisted of 6 weeks. 2 weeks with 3 FTO's. Each FTO was pretty good, and from the 3 I created my own style to become the officer that I am today.

    I know there is A LOT more to learn and demanded from a Police Officer as opposed to a Corrections Officer, hence the much longer FTO training. So, what are the credentials of a Police Officer FTO?

    Where I work, a Corrections Officer can become an FTO if they want. Not much has to be done to become one. Just some time under their belt's and no major disciplinary write-up's. That alone doesn't make a good FTO though...

    Does a Police Officer have to prove they are a worthy FTO in any way, shape or form to their superiors before they become one? I'm sure there are MANY great Police Officers out there that couldn't train a Student Officer if their life depended on it, and it's kind of a scary thought that one could wash during the FTO phase because the Student Officers FTO isn't a good mentor.

    What are your department policies on being an FTO?

    What are the biggest problems Student Officers seem to have during the training process?

    How many Student Officers in your department actually don't pass your departments FTO training?

    Thanks for the answers/advice!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Boins View Post
    With that said, I have a few questions.

    I currently am a CO with the hopes of becoming a Police Officer one day...My FTO training as a CO consisted of 6 weeks. 2 weeks with 3 FTO's. Each FTO was pretty good, and from the 3 I created my own style to become the officer that I am today.

    I know there is A LOT more to learn and demanded from a Police Officer as opposed to a Corrections Officer, hence the much longer FTO training. So, what are the credentials of a Police Officer FTO?

    Where I work, a Corrections Officer can become an FTO if they want. Not much has to be done to become one. Just some time under their belt's and no major disciplinary write-up's. That alone doesn't make a good FTO though...

    Does a Police Officer have to prove they are a worthy FTO in any way, shape or form to their superiors before they become one? I'm sure there are MANY great Police Officers out there that couldn't train a Student Officer if their life depended on it, and it's kind of a scary thought that one could wash during the FTO phase because the Student Officers FTO isn't a good mentor.

    What are your department policies on being an FTO?

    What are the biggest problems Student Officers seem to have during the training process?

    How many Student Officers in your department actually don't pass your departments FTO training?

    Thanks for the answers/advice!
    I can only speak for the Alabama Dept of Public Safety. My agency employs a formal FTO Program which is based on the San Jose Calif PD Model. It consists of a ten week program divided into three phases. Each day of training is documented with a report known as a DOR (Daily Observation Report) .This report is supplemented by a Weekly Observation Report submitted by the FTO Coordinator. The program is very structured, and consists of weekly and end of phase written exams. The progress of the Recruit Officer is very easy to measure, and provisions are made for remedial work when it's required. Each Recruit Officer is required to maintain a "Rook Book" which consists of all the information he/she will aquire during the program. Each FTO/FTO Co-ordinator is certified through a forty hour course.In general. a Trooper needs to have three years in the field before he/she can apply for FTO duties.This is avery general overview of the FTO Program I am personally familiar with. There are quite a few variants, and hopefully, some other Officers can offer you some perspectives.

    Comment


    • #3
      Personally I think one of the major issues I have seen in my department and some others is the fear of firing someone outweighs the fear of being sued because of the PO's incompetence... They keep the PO around even though they are clearly not cut out for the job because they have put money and training into them..... There are clear case law suits that support firing a PO for not performing as needed.... that being said you MUST document everything and do what you can to train their deficiencies out of them....
      "Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good" Romans 12:21

      Comment


      • #4
        Didn't read your post, but I disagree sometimes a good officer doesn't begin with a good FTO. Sometimes all of your FTOs are crap, you deal with them long enough to get on your own, then you hang out and learn from the good cops.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by StudChris View Post
          Didn't read your post, but I disagree sometimes a good officer doesn't begin with a good FTO. Sometimes all of your FTOs are crap, you deal with them long enough to get on your own, then you hang out and learn from the good cops.
          I'll agree with this. You do the FTO things as we all have to and then watch the officers that do a good job and learn from them. One of my best friends had a FTO that was nothing but a gas station troll. He learned nothing. Also, A good attitude and level head has alot to do with being a good cop

          Comment


          • #6
            I appreciate the comments, but does anyone have answers to my questions? Thanks

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Boins View Post
              With that said, I have a few questions.

              I know there is A LOT more to learn and demanded from a Police Officer as opposed to a Corrections Officer, hence the much longer FTO training. So, what are the credentials of a Police Officer FTO?

              Each agency has different requirements for becoming an FTO and several have FTO classes to send the aspiring FTO to. Time in Service, Ability to Teach, Work Ethics, etc...

              Where I work, a Corrections Officer can become an FTO if they want. Not much has to be done to become one. Just some time under their belt's and no major disciplinary write-up's. That alone doesn't make a good FTO though...

              Does a Police Officer have to prove they are a worthy FTO in any way, shape or form to their superiors before they become one?

              Again, Alot have to prove they can pass the muster to be FTO, but then again, the smaller agencies put the new guy with whoever they can. Most are chosen because of their leadership abilities, attitude, and job performance.

              What are your department policies on being an FTO?

              We don't have any in paticular I believe, just whoever the sheriff says your going to ride with, you ride with.

              What are the biggest problems Student Officers seem to have during the training process?

              Before the academy they tend to be OK, maybe a little over zealous, afterwards some are still ok and willing to learn, others know it all already.

              How many Student Officers in your department actually don't pass your departments FTO training?

              very few

              Thanks for the answers/advice!

              Comment


              • #8
                To the Original Poster. I believe I made an honest attempt to answer your question, as did my colleagues. Additionally, they posted some of their thoughts concerning FTO Programs/Officers. They get to do that. What specifically, do want to ask?

                Comment


                • #9
                  On my dept. FTO is a unit level promotion to two stripper. You have to have a minimum of 1 year past training yourself. There is then an oral interview and potential canidates are placed on a list the unit commander then makes the final decision.

                  FTO's have to complete the 40 hour FTO school. Once assigned as an FTO there is supposed to be a mentoring program but it's more paper than actuality. After being an FTO for over a year you become a Senior Field Training Officer. FTO's receive a 5% pay raise over base deputy salary. SFTO's receive an 11% raise over base deputy. We have been trying to implement a Master Field Training Officer program and it looks like those promotions will be coming soon. Masters will receive a 22% pay raise. From the sounds of it they will assist the training sergeants administer the field training program and will take on problem children for remediation or roll up procedures. MFTO canidates must take a centralized written test and oral interview and then are placed on an eligibility list.

                  I have over 5 years experience as a field training officer and almost 20 years on the dept. As my units senior FTO I get stuck with the problem children since there are no actual MFTO's yet. Since being given the hatchet position I've rolled up one trainee, placed another on remediation and really struggled to help get a few others off training succesfully. A good FTO takes pride in success not in failing trainees.

                  Some of the biggest problems I've found especially with the ones that don't make it are a failure to handle stress appropriatly and an inability to articulate their actions. One of my trainees could tell me exactly what had to be done on a high risk traffic stop. But when the rubber hit the road he couldn't funciton. Twice he started to walk up on stolen vehicles when we initiated the felony stop. Another one was asked why he searched somebody. The best answer he could come up with was, "That's what we always do sir".
                  Today's Quote:

                  "The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits."
                  Albert Einstein

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Great post mdrdep! Did these pay raises go through even with the bad economy?
                    Love the job, but hate the paperwork!

                    My favorite Field Training Program | FTO Software . Customizable for Police, Corrections, Dispatch, and EMS, but not priced to break the training budget. Annual Performance Evaluations don't have to be that hard either.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      What is with the sudden bumping of old FTO posts?

                      -V

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by vincelli View Post
                        What is with the sudden bumping of old FTO posts?

                        -V

                        Looks like a new member who has a thing for FTO.......... Also a new member trying to promote his/her software business
                        Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Iowa #1603 View Post
                          Looks like a new member who has a thing for FTO.......... Also a new member trying to promote his/her software business
                          Ah. Now I see. Hadn't even glanced at his signature line.

                          -V

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Sorry, had notifications turned off. Yes, very passionate about field training. From what I've seen it is one of the most important yet under appreciated roles at a PD.

                            I'm trying to make an FTO's life easier through software... at least documentation wise. Been looking at posts to try to learn about issues others are facing. Any thoughts? once we get a demo video done I'll post it and try and get more feedback.
                            Love the job, but hate the paperwork!

                            My favorite Field Training Program | FTO Software . Customizable for Police, Corrections, Dispatch, and EMS, but not priced to break the training budget. Annual Performance Evaluations don't have to be that hard either.

                            Comment

                            MR300x250 Tablet

                            Collapse

                            What's Going On

                            Collapse

                            There are currently 5785 users online. 253 members and 5532 guests.

                            Most users ever online was 19,482 at 11:44 AM on 09-29-2011.

                            Welcome Ad

                            Collapse
                            Working...
                            X