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  • detective42
    replied
    Originally posted by jb5722
    ROSchwoe is right, if you have the "so far" mentality, maybe you should save yourself some time and work towards some non le position.
    It was a mistake......

    Leave a comment:


  • detective42
    replied
    Originally posted by ROSchwoe
    By "so far", do you anticipate the possibility of adding some to your record?

    No, I don't know WHY I typed that!

    Pay it no mind.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kieth M.
    replied
    Originally posted by detective42 View Post

    Candidates seeking consideration under the specialized postal experience track must within the last two years have been a U.S. Postal Service employee, contractor, or intern.[/B]

    Does this mean I would have to work in Postal Service as like a mail carrier or something along that boarder line?
    They also have a U.S. Postal Police - a uniformed division. Perhaps that two years of postal experience can be gained there.

    In 30 years of big-city west-coast police work I had not one interaction with them. I often saw them cruising in their patrol car. Upon a return to work, after days off, I learned one pair of Postal cops encountered a man w/a gun. They did not draw their weapons and ducked down behind their police car. The man w/a gun left.

    Leave a comment:


  • detective42
    replied
    Originally posted by CUFFS137 View Post
    Postal Inspectors are 1811 series (federal job code) criminal investigators which is the exact same title as special agents from the various federal agencies. Postal inspectors simply have a different working title, but they designated exacly the same as all other federal criminal investigators. They have an excellent reputation, and become involved in just about any imagineable type of case from violent street crime, to high end white collar crime. I have yet to meet a Postal Inspector who didn't love his job.

    'OIG' stands for office of inspector general. Most if not all OIG's have 1811 series criminal investigators. It is my understanding that these agents do mostly fraud, and white collar crime type investigations.
    Oh ok cool.

    When I went to the website and read the eligibility/requirements it started off good and I was understanding it then when I started to progress further down it got a tad bit confusing. This is what confused me:


    Postal Experience

    Candidates seeking consideration under the specialized postal experience track must within the last two years have been a U.S. Postal Service employee, contractor, or intern.


    Does this mean I would have to work in Postal Service as like a mail carrier or something along that boarder line?

    Leave a comment:


  • CUFFS137
    replied
    Postal Inspectors are 1811 series (federal job code) criminal investigators which is the exact same title as special agents from the various federal agencies. Postal inspectors simply have a different working title, but they designated exacly the same as all other federal criminal investigators. They have an excellent reputation, and become involved in just about any imagineable type of case from violent street crime, to high end white collar crime. I have yet to meet a Postal Inspector who didn't love his job.

    'OIG' stands for office of inspector general. Most if not all OIG's have 1811 series criminal investigators. It is my understanding that these agents do mostly fraud, and white collar crime type investigations.
    Last edited by CUFFS137; 09-09-2008, 01:13 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • detective42
    replied
    Originally posted by Retired96 View Post
    I didn't work for the Postal Inspectors, I worked major fraud cases for my Dept. LA County Sheriff.
    Oh Ok. Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • Retired96
    replied
    Originally posted by detective42 View Post
    Wow. What are you now? Are you still a Postal Inspector Agent?

    Can you please give me more information, I really want to rely on someone who is actually on this website then the Postal Inspectors website who knows what this job is like.

    So do you think they would hire me when I graduate with my Masters in Criminal Justice? (I would be about 24-26 years of age.) I'm a citizen and I so far have no felonies or misdemeanors. Do I need previous Law Enforcement experience?

    Oh, hence your name you must be retired?
    I didn't work for the Postal Inspectors, I worked major fraud cases for my Dept. LA County Sheriff.

    Leave a comment:


  • detective42
    replied
    Originally posted by Retired96 View Post
    Regarding the Postal Inspectors I was involved in a nationwide medicare/medical fraud case in 1988 that involved hundreds of millions of dollars. The Postal Inspectors handled the entire case as the US Mail was used. They were a top notch agency and were excellent investigators in white collar crime. Many people don't realize that any fraud type crime where the US Mail is used can be investigated by the Postal Inspectors.
    Wow. What are you now? Are you still a Postal Inspector Agent?

    Can you please give me more information, I really want to rely on someone who is actually on this website then the Postal Inspectors website who knows what this job is like.

    So do you think they would hire me when I graduate with my Masters in Criminal Justice? (I would be about 24-26 years of age.) I'm a citizen and I so far have no felonies or misdemeanors. Do I need previous Law Enforcement experience?

    Oh, hence your name you must be retired?

    Leave a comment:


  • Retired96
    replied
    Regarding the Postal Inspectors I was involved in a nationwide medicare/medical fraud case in 1988 that involved hundreds of millions of dollars. The Postal Inspectors handled the entire case as the US Mail was used. They were a top notch agency and were excellent investigators in white collar crime. Many people don't realize that any fraud type crime where the US Mail is used can be investigated by the Postal Inspectors.

    Leave a comment:


  • detective42
    replied
    Originally posted by CUFFS137 View Post
    Do yourself a favor, and DO NOT take a patrol cop job with your sights set on becoming a detective. From what you have noted about your educational qualifications, you have many other options.

    If you go into patrolwork looking for the detective spot, you may likely be disappointed.
    First off, you will be the rookie, the bottom of the list, a no namer who has to learn the vast ins and outs of patrol before even considering looking at detective. You'll have alot of guys in front of you. Guys who come on the job focused on making detective often come off as resentful at being a patrol cop after a while. This does not make them very popular, and in turn may hurt their chances.
    Also, in policework, very little emphasis is put on higher education. I'm am surrounded by guys with nothing more that H.S. diplomas, and others with bachelor degrees. I honestly couldn't tell you who has what. No offense, but it has been my experience that higher education always doesn't translate well on the street.
    You run the risk of becoming married to the money. Agency transfers ofetn mean pay cuts. Some high up may decide that your degree makes you look good for advancement in rank which in ALOT of agencies, GREATLY limits your opportunity to become involved in investigations.
    Then there is the politics. You may be an ace street cop with a masters degree, but how will you handle it when a lesser qualified officer with the right connection makes detective, and you don't. Te police world is FULL of patrol officers who wish that they were detectives (and detectives who shouldn't be detectives).

    Join a fed agency. Besides the tons of alphabet agencies, there are OIG special agent positions in every entity of federal gov't. If you do your homework you may find that the Postal Inspectors have one of the broadest federal 'detective' jobs out there.
    There are state level investigative agencies run out of the A.G's offices, and county prosecutors/ D.A. offices most often have investigative units. All of these agencies have entry level investigator positions, and advancement within the investigative ranks.

    If you want to work strictly in criminal investigations, and have those education credentials, just go into a criminal investigative position. Don't put yourself in a position where it is up to someone else whether or not you get the detective spot.
    Wow, thanks.

    BUT I've been asking a lot of questions about different Federal Agencies and nobody ever brought up Postal Inspectors.

    I went to their website (http://postalinspectors.uspis.gov) and I pretty much like the atmosphere so to speak, so all I really need to do is get a MASTERS degree in Criminal Justice and maybe learn a second or third language. But I'm a bit confused on what they are? Are they ''Special Agents?'' are they ''Field Agents?''

    Can you please tell me what OIG mean? & I'm also going to look into the Criminal Investigations occupation.

    Leave a comment:


  • LA DEP
    replied
    Originally posted by ROSchwoe
    No, I didn't miss you're point. I agree with your point. I was just trying to clarify that while the FBI is generally thought of for their investigative "expertise" (), they do have a unit called FBI Police (and thus there are police officer positions within FBI). I wouldn't go so far, myself, to say they aren't really cops (they're federal LEOs who are limited in their duties by their agency, not the authority given to them by training or statute), but overall, I agree that they do more security work (from what I know about them) than traditional uniformed police work.
    copied on the patch!

    Leave a comment:


  • CUFFS137
    replied
    Do yourself a favor, and DO NOT take a patrol cop job with your sights set on becoming a detective. From what you have noted about your educational qualifications, you have many other options.

    If you go into patrolwork looking for the detective spot, you may likely be disappointed.
    First off, you will be the rookie, the bottom of the list, a no namer who has to learn the vast ins and outs of patrol before even considering looking at detective. You'll have alot of guys in front of you. Guys who come on the job focused on making detective often come off as resentful at being a patrol cop after a while. This does not make them very popular, and in turn may hurt their chances.
    Also, in policework, very little emphasis is put on higher education. I'm am surrounded by guys with nothing more that H.S. diplomas, and others with bachelor degrees. I honestly couldn't tell you who has what. No offense, but it has been my experience that higher education always doesn't translate well on the street.
    You run the risk of becoming married to the money. Agency transfers ofetn mean pay cuts. Some high up may decide that your degree makes you look good for advancement in rank which in ALOT of agencies, GREATLY limits your opportunity to become involved in investigations.
    Then there is the politics. You may be an ace street cop with a masters degree, but how will you handle it when a lesser qualified officer with the right connection makes detective, and you don't. Te police world is FULL of patrol officers who wish that they were detectives (and detectives who shouldn't be detectives).

    Join a fed agency. Besides the tons of alphabet agencies, there are OIG special agent positions in every entity of federal gov't. If you do your homework you may find that the Postal Inspectors have one of the broadest federal 'detective' jobs out there.
    There are state level investigative agencies run out of the A.G's offices, and county prosecutors/ D.A. offices most often have investigative units. All of these agencies have entry level investigator positions, and advancement within the investigative ranks.

    If you want to work strictly in criminal investigations, and have those education credentials, just go into a criminal investigative position. Don't put yourself in a position where it is up to someone else whether or not you get the detective spot.
    Last edited by CUFFS137; 09-07-2008, 02:33 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bearcat357
    replied
    Originally posted by LA DEP View Post
    copy.....I would have sworn on a stack of Bibles that the USMS guys started off in the Federal Courthouses or in transporting prisoners ect (like we start in custody/court services).......
    They do have folks that are Deputy US Marshals that work the Courts in DC.....and that job is freaking death.....

    But at the court houses out there, they still use contract guards for the security....

    Originally posted by LA DEP View Post
    I will now go have a shot of JW Gold as my penance
    I will finish my beer....and have the sweet 21 year old that I am gazing at pour me another one.....

    Leave a comment:


  • LA DEP
    replied
    Originally posted by Bearcat357 View Post
    Was just trying to clarify......

    A lot of the US Federal Court Houses Guards will have USMS emblams and stuff like that on their uniforms and badges.....and USMS runs their show....so...
    copy.....I would have sworn on a stack of Bibles that the USMS guys started off in the Federal Courthouses or in transporting prisoners ect (like we start in custody/court services).......

    I will now go have a shot of JW Gold as my penance

    Leave a comment:


  • Bearcat357
    replied
    Originally posted by LA DEP View Post
    Thats probably where I have seen them....the couple of times I have been in Federal Court (dont ask) all I remember seeing were the USMS guys.......
    Was just trying to clarify......

    A lot of the US Federal Court Houses Guards will have USMS emblams and stuff like that on their uniforms and badges.....and USMS runs their show....so...

    Leave a comment:

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