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  • Reserve Deputy Sheriff Questions

    I understand it is different from state to state, county to county etc, but I had a few questions that are pretty general and just wanted to see how everyone else does it.

    1. Do most reserves complete a regular academy or is there training different as in they break up the subject material to fit the times when you are attending the academy?

    2. The difference is that a reserve is just that, a reserve and only works a certain amount of hours a week or a month?

    3. Reserves only get paid when working, (obviously), and some reserves work for free?

    4. Does a reserve get Cat 1 POST certified in most states?

    I ask because at one of the Sheriff’s offices that I applied for, I might have to work as a reserve for a period of time until the full time spots get approved. Thanks.

    CrossFit

    RossTraining

  • #2
    That does help, Cat 1 is the level of a police officer in the state of Nevada and a corrections officer is a Cat 3. They have a category system out here, I forgot what Cat 2 is allowed to do but you get the idea. Thanks for the information, anyone else.


    Here is our system:

    Within Nevada, Peace Officers are grouped into one of three classes, Category I, Category II, or Category III:

    Category I peace officers include traditional law enforcement officers such as deputy sheriffs, municipal police officers, gaming enforcement and the state troopers of the Nevada Highway Patrol. The Category I peace officer training is a minimum of 480 hours however most Category I academies far exceed the minimum number of hours.

    Category II peace officers are specialists and include officers such as parole, probation, and bailiffs. The Category II training varies between eight and ten weeks.

    Category III peace officers are those officers assigned solely to corrections or detention. The typical training is four weeks.[2]
    Last edited by djblank87; 08-31-2008, 09:11 AM.

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    RossTraining

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jb5722
      in NC reserve officers are the same as every other officer in terms of authority (within their jurisdiction). the requirements each agency puts on their reserves are up to that agency. reserves attend the same academy as full time officers, no distinction is made between the two.
      Thank you for the reply, I find out in October where I rank on the list that they are creating. Either way I feel it is a perfect opportunity to get POST Certified, gain experience and hopefully move into a full time spot down the road.

      Thanks again.

      CrossFit

      RossTraining

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      • #4
        Originally posted by djblank87 View Post
        I understand it is different from state to state, county to county etc, but I had a few questions that are pretty general and just wanted to see how everyone else does it.

        1. Do most reserves complete a regular academy or is there training different as in they break up the subject material to fit the times when you are attending the academy?
        No, I attended a 40 hour pre basic course from the ILEA, but I now do all the other training things that the full time employees do, just not the 16 week course.

        2. The difference is that a reserve is just that, a reserve and only works a certain amount of hours a week or a month?
        I have full police powers 24/7 from my department. I am only required to be in uniform 16 hours a month.

        3. Reserves only get paid when working, (obviously), and some reserves work for free?
        For the most part we don't get paid, other than uniforms and tools of the trade that my department bought for me.

        4. Does a reserve get Cat 1 POST certified in most states?

        I ask because at one of the Sheriff’s offices that I applied for, I might have to work as a reserve for a period of time until the full time spots get approved. Thanks.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by djblank87 View Post
          I understand it is different from state to state, county to county etc, but I had a few questions that are pretty general and just wanted to see how everyone else does it.

          1. Do most reserves complete a regular academy or is there training different as in they break up the subject material to fit the times when you are attending the academy?

          In Wisconsin, a reserve is trained and certified to the same standard as a full time officer - the same 520 hours basic training and 24 hours a year. Of course, full timers tend to get more ongoing training than the minimum.

          Obviously my skills are no where near those of a FT guy - he does it all more often than I do.


          2. The difference is that a reserve is just that, a reserve and only works a certain amount of hours a week or a month?

          Depends on the agency here. Most often you'll only find reserve deputies doing special events and things like boat patrol. In my county and one other one I know of we don't do regular patrol time, only the FT guys do that. If I'm on the road I'm a ride-along - still a deputy, but I'm never alone. Reserve programs are not terribly wide-spread here.

          3. Reserves only get paid when working, (obviously), and some reserves work for free?

          I have heard of unpaid reserves - the ones I know of in this state are paid, AFAIK.

          4. Does a reserve get Cat 1 POST certified in most states?

          All certs are the same in WI, you're either certified or you're not. (I could be wrong, don't spend a lot of time with that stuff.)

          I ask because at one of the Sheriff’s offices that I applied for, I might have to work as a reserve for a period of time until the full time spots get approved. Thanks.
          Hope that helps. Nothing wrong with Reserve time, I really enjoy my job. Of course I'll enjoy it even more when it leads to a FT slot!

          Good luck to you.
          For every one hundred men you send us,
          Ten should not even be here.
          Eighty are nothing but targets.
          Nine of them are real fighters;
          We are lucky to have them, they the battle make.
          Ah, but the one. One of them is a warrior.
          And he will bring the others back.

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          • #6
            Hoosier_Boy and Sgt. thank you for the replies and information. Hopefully I can find out more about their program soon, I have to update the BI with some new vehicle information and I will try to pick his brain some.

            CrossFit

            RossTraining

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            • #7
              in my county you have to be certified or the sheriff wont touch you reserve,part time ,fulltime whatever. most reserves just work to keep their certification up to date so when they decide to come back full time they dont have to attent the refresher course. it pretty much comes down to your sheriff
              In god i trust everyone else gets run on NCIC

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              • #8
                Originally posted by C-15 View Post
                it pretty much comes down to your sheriff
                Thanks for the info, that pretty much what I figured, it depends on the SO's you work for. Thanks again.

                CrossFit

                RossTraining

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