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How do Details work?

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  • How do Details work?

    How do Details/extra Security work? Is it like overtime?

  • #2
    For my department, as long as its for the department, yes. You may flex your time and come in at a different time than normal, but if you run over the normal 8.5 hours the rest will be OT.

    Security details as far as for a private entity, no. That's part-time work and pays whatever you negotiate with your private employer. The department will not compensate you for anything you do while working for a private entity, including making arrests, etc.
    I miss you, Dave.
    http://www.odmp.org/officer/20669-of...david-s.-moore

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    • #3
      We have a set detail rate that's paid for details- e.g. for directing traffic for utility companies, security/traffic for football games, etc. For some people, it's higher than their overtime rate- for others, it's less.
      summer - winter - work

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      • #4
        Originally posted by CruiserClass View Post
        For my department, as long as its for the department, yes. You may flex your time and come in at a different time than normal, but if you run over the normal 8.5 hours the rest will be OT.

        Security details as far as for a private entity, no. That's part-time work and pays whatever you negotiate with your private employer. The department will not compensate you for anything you do while working for a private entity, including making arrests, etc.
        Good response.

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        • #5
          One of the Lts schedules us for the 5 details we have in the city (if we want to be scheduled). We can switch around or give up details as much as we want. We submit a payment invoice to the company ($25 an hour) and eventually they pay us.

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          • #6
            The agency I worked for offered OT details (such as ATV Beach Patrol, foot beat, patrol in problem areas, etc...) regularly for any officers that wanted to sign up for them. Many officers would work 10 or 20 hrs OT a week, some more. These assignments were all paid OT or available as comp. time off (officer's choice). None provided less than 4 hours as a minimum, at time and a half regular pay.

            Our city had a lot of movie/TV location shoots and those companies all had to "hire" the officers needed through the city along with the permit process. The officers were allowed to sign up for the OT, receiving an 8 hour minimum (no matter how short the production was) and a $50.00 bonus, to off-set the difference between their pay and supervisors (who also worked these details). Since the officers were all on-duty and received their pay from the city, any injuries were considered IOD. All pay was based on their regular salary, adjusted for things like educational incentive, longevity, etc...
            "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

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            • #7
              Originally posted by pulicords View Post
              The agency I worked for offered OT details (such as ATV Beach Patrol, foot beat, patrol in problem areas, etc...) regularly for any officers that wanted to sign up for them. Many officers would work 10 or 20 hrs OT a week, some more. These assignments were all paid OT or available as comp. time off (officer's choice). None provided less than 4 hours as a minimum, at time and a half regular pay.

              Our city had a lot of movie/TV location shoots and those companies all had to "hire" the officers needed through the city along with the permit process. The officers were allowed to sign up for the OT, receiving an 8 hour minimum (no matter how short the production was) and a $50.00 bonus, to off-set the difference between their pay and supervisors (who also worked these details). Since the officers were all on-duty and received their pay from the city, any injuries were considered IOD. All pay was based on their regular salary, adjusted for things like educational incentive, longevity, etc...
              So it is a basically a type of overtime?

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              • #8
                Ours is pretty much the same as Pulli said
                Today's Quote:

                "The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits."
                Albert Einstein

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                • #9
                  We refer to a call for service as a "detail".

                  Okay, seriously, my agency has been in a staffing crisis for several years. There are mandatory overtime shifts pretty much every day. It works out to about once a month for everyone. There are OT whores who will take shifts for others, so it's usually pretty to give the shifts away. There are also lots of shifts in court security.

                  As far as outside work, the only detail is at the county fairgrounds. Any special event at night (usually weddings and quinceaneras) has to have a minimum of two deputies hired on overtime. The county fair board of directors required it after too many fights and useless private guards.
                  Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

                  I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

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