Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Martial Arts

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Boxing - I train upwards of 5 times a week - and it is grueling; but the conditioning and training you receive is second to none.
    Last edited by FWPD Panther; 04-27-2007, 05:06 PM.
    "A fighter never knows when it's the last bell. He doesn't want to face that." - Sugar Ray Leonard

    Comment


    • #47
      I’ve worked as a corrections officer (direct supervision/unarmed) and am now a police officer. I have studied Aikido and Hapkido for years. I have also studied Kajukenbo and Kickboxing. I strongly feel that it’s not the martial art that counts, but the martial artist.

      As we all know, in law enforcement we need to work within our agencies continuum of force. In no [email protected]#t talk that translates to “court-proofing” yourself and your dept. from civil liability. I have found Aikido and Hapkido extremely helpful. It has saved my butt more then once. The drawback to the Aiki-arts is the time one must dedicate to become an expert (years).

      I see Leo’s take a few classes, maybe a year, and think the art will work for them on the street. Unfortunately, it takes years to become truly gifted in Aikido. I recommended Aikido or Hapkido to the Officer willing to put in his/her time. If you are looking for quick results, BJJ is great and it works! I’ve cross trained in BJJ and think it is the best for quick self-defense and DT skills. I also think Judo and traditional Ju-jitsu is great too. The Pilipino arts are super for Leo’s as well. In short, cross train but stay with one art for 3-4 years before moving on.
      In God we trust, everyone else we search!

      Comment


      • #48
        Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is by far the best martial art for law enforcement. No striking, only submissions. Which is perfect for use of force.

        Comment


        • #49
          I'd would say jui-jitsui is the best ma, most fights go to the ground and using BJJ will give you control and the advantage. If you are looking for a good workout partner/s, check with the local wrestling team, great practices will help you tremendously.

          Comment


          • #50
            I wanted to expand on my previous post especially re boxing. Boxing or kickboxing or muay thai is really good not because the answer to every UOF situation is to smoke the other guy in the head.

            Boxing is great because once you are at the level where you are sparring with other guys at the local boxing club, it's pathetically easy to avoid the punches from some untrained drunk on the street. Even better if while dodging his flailing haymakers, you can land a Muay Thai leg kick with your Danners.

            Same goes for Judo. If you can toss around a judo guy...dumping an untrained guy who rushes you is nothing.

            If you can do both...you are easily able to deal with 95% of the guys out there.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by effinggoof View Post
              I wanted to expand on my previous post especially re boxing. Boxing or kickboxing or muay thai is really good not because the answer to every UOF situation is to smoke the other guy in the head.

              Boxing is great because once you are at the level where you are sparring with other guys at the local boxing club, it's pathetically easy to avoid the punches from some untrained drunk on the street. Even better if while dodging his flailing haymakers, you can land a Muay Thai leg kick with your Danners.

              Same goes for Judo. If you can toss around a judo guy...dumping an untrained guy who rushes you is nothing.

              If you can do both...you are easily able to deal with 95% of the guys out there.

              I agree with you 110%, I've been saying the same thing for years. Boxing/kickboxing/muay thai (pick one) with some strong judo or jujitsu (the japanese kind that isn't built around ground work) basics and plenty of practice and you'll have everything you need - fast, simple, easy to remember, and user friendly.

              Comment


              • #52
                ^^Thanks wc145.

                The reason that I think that Judo is better than BJJ for LEO is because BJJ traditionally has poor takedowns and concentrates more on groundwork/guard whereas judo is more takedown oriented...especially in the early part of the sport. MMA schools usually incorporate more wrestling/judo mindset re takedowns as well and if there is a good MMA school...go for it.

                Judo schools are usually cheap compared to BJJ which matters to a lot of people.

                Judo also avoids a lot of that akido/small circle ju jitsu stuff that focuses on small joint manipulation...it's not that that stuff does not work, but it's notoriously unreliable.

                Judo has a quick learning curve...much like boxing...you can become pretty good fairly quickly. That's not to say that either is simple...if becoming a great boxer was easy they would not pay guys 20 million a fight to do it.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Each martial art emphasizes different skills. As you grow and mature in any of the arts, (boxing is, by the way, a sport, not really a martial art) you will find that they all tend to teach the same things, only the emphasis is different. For example, while both judo and jujitsu emphasize throws, joint locks and grappling, they also teach strikes, blocks, and weapons. The various schools of karate also teach throws, joint locks and grappling, although emphasizing strikes, blocks and weapons.
                  The main thing that all teach is a positive mental attitude! This is the single most important thing any student can get from martial arts training.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    If I had time for only one form, needed rapid proficiency and wanted a defense against empty-hand, blade, stick and close-quarters firearms, I would choose Krav Maga, hands down. IMHO, the defensive moves are intuitive and simple, and easily "engrammed" into the psyche. The offensive moves are designed to bring the fight to a swift conclusion or will at least permit you to take cover.

                    The problem in many areas is finding a school, but it's spreading.
                    Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-02-2007, 04:07 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      I am a long time karateka, and have been a judo competitor for 4 and a half years, and fought in a few MMA tournaments.
                      I would have to say Brazaillian Jui jitsu would be excellent for the ground, if you can afford it take it!, you NEED ground skills!
                      That said, Judo's ground game, while not as refined as Brazillian jiu jitsu, is'nt too bad.
                      something to consider, Sambo, Judo, Jiu jitsu, greco-roman, freestylye, it is all Wrestling, and as such, has many universal principles( i.e. level change, penatration step, use the man not the mat, ect).
                      Muay thai is also excallent in the clinch, excallent low line destruction, pretty solid stricking base.
                      You really need to be competent in three areas in fighting, Stand up, the clinch, and ground fighting. keep this in mind in your training, and dont neglect your other tools as well( asp, firearm, ect.)

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by milwaukeecop2 View Post
                        I am a long time karateka, and have been a judo competitor for 4 and a half years, and fought in a few MMA tournaments.
                        I would have to say Brazaillian Jui jitsu would be excellent for the ground, if you can afford it take it!, you NEED ground skills!
                        That said, Judo's ground game, while not as refined as Brazillian jiu jitsu, is'nt too bad.
                        something to consider, Sambo, Judo, Jiu jitsu, greco-roman, freestylye, it is all Wrestling, and as such, has many universal principles( i.e. level change, penatration step, use the man not the mat, ect).
                        Muay thai is also excallent in the clinch, excallent low line destruction, pretty solid stricking base.
                        You really need to be competent in three areas in fighting, Stand up, the clinch, and ground fighting. keep this in mind in your training, and dont neglect your other tools as well( asp, firearm, ect.)
                        When I suggest judo or japanese jujitsu one of the reasons I do is for the throws and takedowns. I want to be able to use the ground as a weapon, I want to take my opponent down hard and immediately move to control and cuff. I don't want to go down with them and fight on the ground if I can help it, but if I'm in that situation I fight the same way as I do standing up - elbows, knees, etc. - until I can gain control and get them cuffed. I'm not interested in staying on the ground any longer than absolutely necessary so, as far as I'm concerned, finishing holds, pain compliance, chokes, etc, take too long and leave me too vulnerable.

                        Remeber, for LEOs it's not about fighting, it's about getting control and taking them into custody as quickly as possible. IMO, the idea of "advanced" martial skills as applied to practical use is to take away what you don't need or use while refining what you do rather than continuing to build a huge arsenal of techniques that you'll never use. The man that learns and works on 10 practical moves everyday will be far more adept and effective with them than one that tries to maintain scores of techniques over the same amount of training time.

                        I say training to move fast, hit hard, and keep everything as basic and simple as possible is the formula for success - ground 'em, pound 'em, cuff 'em and stuff 'em.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by WC145 View Post
                          When I suggest judo or japanese jujitsu one of the reasons I do is for the throws and takedowns. I want to be able to use the ground as a weapon, I want to take my opponent down hard and immediately move to control and cuff. I don't want to go down with them and fight on the ground if I can help it, but if I'm in that situation I fight the same way as I do standing up - elbows, knees, etc. - until I can gain control and get them cuffed. I'm not interested in staying on the ground any longer than absolutely necessary so, as far as I'm concerned, finishing holds, pain compliance, chokes, etc, take too long and leave me too vulnerable.

                          Remeber, for LEOs it's not about fighting, it's about getting control and taking them into custody as quickly as possible. IMO, the idea of "advanced" martial skills as applied to practical use is to take away what you don't need or use while refining what you do rather than continuing to build a huge arsenal of techniques that you'll never use. The man that learns and works on 10 practical moves everyday will be far more adept and effective with them than one that tries to maintain scores of techniques over the same amount of training time.

                          I say training to move fast, hit hard, and keep everything as basic and simple as possible is the formula for success - ground 'em, pound 'em, cuff 'em and stuff 'em.
                          If you dont learn ground, you will get in a bad situation, BJJ isnt about JUST submission holds, it is about gaining control and maintaining control. We are not talking about "pulling guard" with a resister.
                          You have to train with live resisting training partners, you have to have a stand up plan, a clinch plan, and a ground game plan, that you know will work,because you have applied it resonably well against someone thats trying to make you fail.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Street Cop defense and Offense

                            Originally posted by JsHarmon7 View Post
                            What are some opinions on the most applicable martial art to study for law enforcement. I currently am taking classes in Okinawan Shorin-Kenpo...
                            Aikido is very important to maintain control of subjects who resist you when you have to place them into custody and that's what we train with in Va in the academy, atleast that's what we trained in for two weeks hands on fighting. However to be honest my years of playing Linebacker and Noseguard in Football from Peewee's to College has benefited me more than any Martial Art. Lifting Weights is important also to reduce injury and add strength. The number one body part you need to be strong as a street cop though is your hands and your grip specifically.
                            "Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. The MARINES don't have that problem." ....Ronald Reagan

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              i would have to say...that no matter what classes you take..the big key is NEVER give them a chance to grab you first.its like caveman days.I KNOW you aint gonna touch my steak.instinct.pure and natural and within you

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Most any point I would make has been covered. There is no room in police work for 'defensive tactics'. Police officers are not defensive...An arrest, taking physical control of another person, is OFFENSIVE. If I am assaulted, I have a duty to not only win, but then to effect an arrest on the assaulter. It has been my experience that all combative arrests take place in the grappling range, and usually on the ground. You may very well be attacked by a subject throwing hay makers at you, but you will eventually have to arrest him/her. You could trade punches and kicks, but a one punch knock out is a TRULY rare thing. Most of you probably know that the longer you are in striking range, the greater your chances are of catching a lucky shot. Striking for police purposes is low percentage at best. If you know that you will have to close with a combative resister eventually, why not just do it sooner rather than later, and minimize your chances of taking shots. Stay out of range until you are ready to grapple. With this philosophy in mind officers should train in any styles that have an emphasis on winning in the clinch range. Most of the styles I would recomend (judo, BJJ, wrestling, sambo Thai boxing) have been mentioned. Finding a trainer that truly emphasizes the uniqueness of police needs is a rare thing. My experience is in BJJ, although I would trade that off in a heartbeat for a handfull of reliable training partners, a matted room, and a handfull of the better physical tactics instructional dvds. I have kibun. I like it, I'd like to learn some of the ISR Matrix stuff.
                                Last edited by CUFFS137; 08-10-2007, 08:53 PM. Reason: content

                                Comment

                                MR300x250 Tablet

                                Collapse

                                What's Going On

                                Collapse

                                There are currently 8984 users online. 415 members and 8569 guests.

                                Most users ever online was 19,482 at 12:44 PM on 09-29-2011.

                                Welcome Ad

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X