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  • #31
    Have you ever seen this ?
    http://www.metacafe.com/watch/143577/specnaz_traning/

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    • #32
      [QUOTE=bigpoppaproppy]sorry for the old thread bump, just saw it

      I train MMA, and our brazilian jiu-jitsu class is comprised majorily of cops in the county...the instructor teaches the ground fighting at the academy/QUOTE]

      Most of my "hands on" end up on the ground so I have to side with Big P.
      When your fun ends, my fun begins

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      • #33
        Just my two cents. I've been in more than a few fights out here, with a couple of them being life threatening. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu seems to work the best because, after all, most fights from my own personal experience seem to end up on the ground.

        Similarly, the elbow strikes and knee strikes from Muay Thai taught at our police academy are very effective as well for the simple fact that real fighting on the street takes place in the space of a phone booth. Thus, there are only a handful of techniques that are:

        1. Practical in this confined space; and

        2. Are Simple and Easy enough to remember under the stress of a real street fight.

        There is NOTHING pretty or flashy about street fights. They are ugly and unpredictable. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and the basic elbow strikes/knee strikes of Muay Thai have served me well.

        CAVEAT: I would never advocate rolling around on the ground with an offender for the simple fact that I carry a gun as a police officer. However, if you're going to most likely end up on the ground, which often I do, then Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu has been the answer.


        Be Safe,

        cpd007

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        • #34
          Hey I agree with the mauy Thai and JJ. That is why I did the simple Police tactics video.

          www.KibunInc.com
          Budda sat in front of a wall and when he stood up he was enlightened. I sat in front of a wall and when I stood up the wall was enlightened.


          We forge our skills in the fire of our will.

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          • #35
            JJCOP,

            My question is, how do you learn practical techniques from a video? I mean I can't practice on my wife so where does the muscle memory come in...I don't see it happening from just sitting there and watching it.
            Moooooooooooo, I'm a goat

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            • #36
              This is a subject that is near and dear to my heart.

              I think it's important that no one buy into one orthodoxy and everyone should take ownership of their own training.

              The question is not and should not be "What martial art is best"...because there is no one answer.

              In order to be a complete fighter, you should know how to punch and defend from punches...you should be prepared to throw and defend from kicks..you should know what to do in a clinch...how to dump a guy on the ground...what to do on the ground...how to escape from common holds...and if you are a cop add in some weapons retention and your own weapons...oh, and did I mention knives and blunt objects?

              There is no one magic bullet. No one course, belt, certificate or trophy that guarantees that it's owner is bulletproof.

              But after that philosophical rant I just went on...most communities have boxing and judo clubs that are extremely cheap. Do both for a year and you will be able to deal with 95% of the guys out there.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by JSD73
                JJCOP,

                My question is, how do you learn practical techniques from a video? I mean I can't practice on my wife so where does the muscle memory come in...I don't see it happening from just sitting there and watching it.
                It is true that you can not learn from just watching a video. You do have to practice. Is your wife the only person you can work out with. How about some friends. Videos are good to learn different ideas from and how the technique is correctly applied. But a video without any training is just a movie. Practice with some of the guys at work.

                Take care and be safe
                Budda sat in front of a wall and when he stood up he was enlightened. I sat in front of a wall and when I stood up the wall was enlightened.


                We forge our skills in the fire of our will.

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                • #38
                  Well as much as I'd like to practice on my wife, she'd probably kill me in my sleep. I understand what you're saying though, it's a matter of finding guys with the same dang schedule.
                  Moooooooooooo, I'm a goat

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                  • #39
                    Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu is a good art. I just came back from studying in Japan for 2 weeks in January. It is all about distance, timing and rhythm. It uses concepts of taking your opponents space to off balance them.

                    2nd idea train in anything. Just train. Pick something, learn it and apply it.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by JSD73
                      Well as much as I'd like to practice on my wife, she'd probably kill me in my sleep. I understand what you're saying though, it's a matter of finding guys with the same dang schedule.
                      I agree. Everytime we put together a little training at the station, shift change comes along and I work with a bunch of different guys.
                      Budda sat in front of a wall and when he stood up he was enlightened. I sat in front of a wall and when I stood up the wall was enlightened.


                      We forge our skills in the fire of our will.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        I love boxing. I box regularly at our station. It's the best training out there in terms of improving your cardio. However, I know more officers who have broke their hands and ended up in the emergency room than any other type of injury. Many of my partners have broke their hands, including yours truly just over a year ago.

                        I understand that certain people may blame us officers and say that if we used proper technique, proper breathing, proper footwork, etc., then maybe we wouldn't have broke our hands. The problem with this line of thought is that maybe the above proper technique works in the gym or the tournament, but all that proper technique goes completely out the window on the street. On the street, when someone is trying to truly hurt you, and/or kill you, or disarm you, proper breathing/footwork is totally useless. There's no time to think about proper technique- you're just fighting to save your hide. Period.
                        Street fights are ugly and unpredictable, and very dangerous. Only techniques that are simple and easy to learn and apply under combat stress are practical on the street. There's no dancing around with proper footwork or proper breathing. I've always ended up in close quarters in the clinch in the first 1 or 2 seconds, and then usually onto the ground we go. Not because I want to, but that's where I, and many other CPD officers end up- on the ground.

                        If one looks at boxing from this perspective, then it's easy to understand why many officers break their hands on the street. The same proper technique I enjoy in the gym station, has no practicality on the street. When your heart rate races way up high, and the tunnel vision and auditory exclusion kick in, proper technique goes bye-bye.

                        This is why I pretty much stick with the Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and the basic elbow and knee strikes derived from Muay Thai. After all, most of my street encounters end up on the ground anyway. Furthermore, most fights take place in the space of a phone booth. What works in the space of a phone booth ? Elbow and knee strikes, eye gouges, and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

                        Like I said, I love boxing, and I do it often; but, I hate seeing officers break their hands because the boxing that we all enjoy is not how it all goes down on the street.

                        Everybody Be Safe,

                        cpd007

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                        • #42
                          SPEAR

                          Krav Maga

                          Brazilian Ju-Jitsu

                          Any other real MMA training where you combine fighting at all ranges, kicking, punching, stand up grappling, and ground fighting.

                          There are some advantages to knowing the throws from Judo.

                          There is also some value in learing how to hit and take a hit, so sparring MMA, boxing, kickboxing, etc, should be included in any training program. But skip any sport sparring where the fight is interrupted each time someone scores a point.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by cpd007
                            I love boxing. I box regularly at our station. It's the best training out there in terms of improving your cardio. However, I know more officers who have broke their hands and ended up in the emergency room than any other type of injury. Many of my partners have broke their hands, including yours truly just over a year ago.
                            This should be a clue to everyone out there. In my years of boxing I saw several broken hands. In fact a break of the fith metacarpal (pinkie finger) is commonly referred to as a "boxer's fracture." If a boxer with taped hands and 14 or 16 ounce gloves on, still breaks their hand on someone's head, then closed fist strikes to the head on the street with nothing protecting your hands other than possibly a set of search gloves is a bad idea.

                            I boxed for several years, and now I work hard to train to break the habit of striking the head with a closed fist.
                            Last edited by SA13; 04-14-2007, 07:41 PM. Reason: correction of a spelling error

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                            • #44
                              I completely agree with SA13. You couldn't be more right, brother. Punching the human skull with bare hands is a bad idea. I, and many others, have learned this the hard way. I also completely agree with you about the SPEAR, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, and Krav Maga. Very good post on your part.

                              Be Safe,

                              cpd007

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                This thread has been gutted. Orginal thread was something like 8 pages. What gives.
                                "Anyone is capable of anything"

                                "I did absolutely nothing, and it was everything I thought it could be".

                                -Peter Gibbons
                                Office Space

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