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EMT, TEMS, Tactical Medics

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  • rmack
    replied
    Do some networking. Talk to your tactical team to see if they have medics. Make sure the medics are TEMS/TCCC proficient. Get them to do a training. There is already great advice. You don't need to know how to take blood pressures and transport old folks...you need to know how to make the red stuff to stop leaking, how to get air in and out.

    Leave a comment:


  • TEMPO
    replied
    Tactical EMS course

    (Hennepin County Medical Center is a non-profit government agency)

    Here is a little history of the Tactical Emergency Medical Peace Officer and what it offers. TEMPO was originally prepared for the patrol level officer who finds themselves faced with a medical emergency in the course of a law enforcement action. It has applicability to SWAT but is much more comprehensive in terms of providing information on topics that are traditionally thought to be non-SWAT oriented. We believe that offering this comprehensive approach benefits all officers and not just specialized SWAT officers. The Course currently has three options for delivery:

    TEMPO EMT / Refresher Refresher 24 hours $455
    TEMPO FR / Refresher Refresher 16 hours $298
    TEMPO Customized Course 8 Hours $125

    We base our training on current, state-of-the-art medical Life Saving Interventions (LSI’s) for Law Enforcement Officers (LEOs) faced with common and atypical tactical situations. We balance that with some standard civilian care that LEOs are required to render. A LEO taking our course can expect to be placed in a modified stress environment with light to moderate physical demands. As such, we do not recommend this Course to officers with significant health limitations or those that are on limited duty due to a physical condition. TEMPO is fast paced with little or no down time, and we train in both indoor and outdoor settings regardless of conditions (except when outdoor conditions would be dangerous).

    The general objectives for any of the Courses are:

    • LEOs will gain up to a significant increase in medical survival knowledge.

    • LEOs will know how to assess their physical capabilities and retain the needed motivation to survive deadly situations.

    • LEOs will master the LSI of tactical tourniquet use

    • LEOs will master the LSI of tactical airway management

    • LEOs will understand options associated with tactical LSI evacuation for self, partner and civilians

    • LEOs will receive instruction on medical situations that are unique to law enforcement

    • LEOs will be comfortable providing patient care under duress to themselves and others

    • LEOs will receive hands on, scenario-based instruction in an academy-style method
    Depending on the course, specific objectives will also be developed. These specific objectives would be developed based on the individual needs of the department. For instance, a rural department might need instruction on medical evacuation helicopter use and operations in their TEMPO First Responder Course because of their distance away from definitive medical facilities whereas a metro department would not. These specific objectives can be flexible and customized to what your department needs.

    We also have a world-class faculty that teaches for the TEMPO Course. Our faculty backgrounds cover the gamut from basic EMT through physician and everything in-between. Many of our faculty are cross-trained as LEOs or have been chosen because of their specific experience with military medicine, use of force practice, or tactical EMS experience. Our faculty have been chosen specifically for their ability to teach and several of them have global reputations for expertise in certain subjects that bridge the medical/law enforcement interface. These subjects include: Arrest-Related Death Issues, Management of Emotionally Disturbed Persons, Excited Delirium Syndrome, Use of Force Physiology of the Suspect and LEO, Medical Considerations Surrounding TASER Device Usage, etc.

    COST:
    As far as cost we have a sliding scale and that depends primarily on the Course of instruction chosen, the number of officers to be trained, and the training location. We can bring the course to you, or you can come to our home base of operations at the Southwest Metro Public Safety Training Facility in Edina, MN.
    Attached Files

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  • SLDPD
    replied
    I just signed up for a tact med course through my states DHS office. Maybe you can try your state and I know what's it like for a Police Department not to provide any training. Sucks when you have to get it on your own.

    Leave a comment:


  • LA DEP
    replied
    Originally posted by djs105 View Post
    Exactly what I wanted / needed to know. Thanks all!
    If you have the choice, take a TCCC class where the practical application day is NOT in a classroom setting.....it is much more realistic to do the medical skill sets in a non controlled environment....or while getting shot at with sims ect.....and then having to move your 'patients' a half mile or more!

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  • djs105
    replied
    Exactly what I wanted / needed to know. Thanks all!

    Leave a comment:


  • careerchange#2
    replied
    If you can think of an acronym, I probably have it after my name. EMT class is worthless for the type of life saving skills the average patrol officers need. Tourniquets, wound packing, chest sealing are all -10 level skills that can and should be taught in a 2-4 hour block of instruction.

    We teach it every two years to every swinging Richard and Rachel including issuing tourniquets. We've had several usages with great success. Want to put on splints and take BP's? Go EMT. Want to learn the very basics needed to save critical patients in non-permissive environments? Go TCCC. www.naemt.org and look up TCCC classes.

    Or, if your agency wants to fly me out there to train everyone I am available

    Leave a comment:


  • LA DEP
    replied
    You don't need to be an EMT to take a TCCC class.....they should be required for every patrol officer, if not every academy recruit.

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  • just joe
    replied
    If you are going to get an EMT cert you need to find a squad to run with or you will lose your skills. I don't know how it works in IL but our officers have to take written and practical skills protocol tests every year which are administered by our local hospital's EMS education folks.

    Leave a comment:


  • ERMedic
    replied
    Take an EMT Class to start. After awhile with EMS experience, then take a TEMS/TCCC class.

    Leave a comment:


  • djs105
    started a topic EMT, TEMS, Tactical Medics

    EMT, TEMS, Tactical Medics

    Is anyone a Police Officer / Paramedic (or EMT), "TEMS" Operator, etc. I have a basic knowledge of trauma first aid and self/buddy care, but I would like to learn more.

    My department is useless, so whatever I do is on my own. Can anyone recommend any classes (in the Chicagoland area) or maybe online? Or should I seek out EMT classes?

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