I asked the group, “All right, who is up next?” There were no takers – just whiners. “I’m tired, someone else go…” “Tim and I are talking about something important, we’ll go next time…” and “I have to finish this text message…” These were all common responses from the cadets at a police academy I had just begun training for. I was so aggravated that I was planning each of their demises in my head, and it wasn’t a pretty picture.

I was helping another instructor with the second day of Traffic Stops & Approaches, and I was shocked how unenthusiastic the cadets were. What was normally an interesting and interactive part of police training had now become a time of complacency that could result in later tragedy. The problem was in the way the training was being conducted by the instructor, who had decades of law enforcement experience, but was limited as an educator of cops. Ray knew how to perform a safe and effective traffic stop but not how to transfer his wisdom to cadets. A problem that every educator and trainer has faced at some point...

Full article at

phalanxle.com/2013/02/19/strength-comes-from-the-huddle-even-in-police-training/

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