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  • EVOC Training

    I don't know if other agencies are experiencing the same issues we are having, but to all my fellow EVOC instructors, how are you conveying the need to properly clear intersections during emergency response to your recruits?

    We have just implemented the EVOC101 web based training. I spend alot of time on how to properly clear intersections, yet I have officers totaling vehicles because they don't do what I have instructed them to do...it is getting really frustrating. We just had a rookie do 10K in damage to an 09 with 4K miles on it when he blew through an intersection.

    I'm pulling what little hair I have out because this is occurring so frequently, despite all the training time we devote to it. If anyone has any thoughts, or can share what your agencies do to explain that two objects can't occupy the same space at the same time, I'm all ears...HELP
    Government exists to protect us from each other. Where government has gone beyond its limits is in deciding to protect us from ourselves.

    Ronald Reagan

  • #2
    Not sure if this helps but I find most Rookies are the ones who tend to total cars from code three runs. The one reason that I do not get excited over a code three run is that I have done hundreds over the years (I work in a ghetto where we roll code three almost everyday). Have the Officers run more practice code three runs or allow them to roll C3 on more types of calls. Officers will get use to it and the andrenalin rush, and learn to take intersections slower.

    Not sure if this helps.
    Budda sat in front of a wall and when he stood up he was enlightened. I sat in front of a wall and when I stood up the wall was enlightened.


    We forge our skills in the fire of our will.

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    • #3
      At the risk of being overly simplistic, I will offer that if the rookies aren't doing what they are told it is a discipline issue, not a training issue. Don't hire your problems. That said: We teach liability in emergency driving in accordance with our Dept. policy in the classroom and re-enforce the fundamentals on the track. Additionally, the importance of how it is presented (quality of instruction) cannot be overstated.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by galeo7008 View Post
        At the risk of being overly simplistic, I will offer that if the rookies aren't doing what they are told it is a discipline issue, not a training issue. Don't hire your problems. That said: We teach liability in emergency driving in accordance with our Dept. policy in the classroom and re-enforce the fundamentals on the track. Additionally, the importance of how it is presented (quality of instruction) cannot be overstated.
        With regards to it being a disciplinary issue, I agree. Generally speaking, one good wreck usually removes the "I'm the police so I can do what I want" attitude. My goal is to remove it prior to release from the academy.

        After a major preventable crash, you are faced with suspension time as well as using your feet for your transportation for a period of time.

        I guess what i'm looking for are agencies that actually set up a practical exercise that involves clearing intersections correctly that will coincide with classroom instruction. I'm more than willing to set up something with cones, but we are not fortunate enough to have a dedicated driving facility...it's whatever expanse of asphalt that we can lay hands on prior to training.
        Government exists to protect us from each other. Where government has gone beyond its limits is in deciding to protect us from ourselves.

        Ronald Reagan

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        • #5
          Make em visit odmp.org or copy some of the stats to put in handouts. FBI LODD stats for five years broken down by cause factors might be good to show them. See if state agency with responsiblity for crash stats can give you stats on LE and FD/EMS fleet accidents.

          Mass email O.com LE news re fleet accidents everytime one is reported.

          Anything to get the big red S toned down. Too many LE injuries and death to the overconfiidence of having a company car w/ lights, siren and the authority to violate traffic laws in the course of duty. John and Jane Q are driving with their own agenda's and are'nt neccessarily aware of or even care what you're responding to if it does'nt involve them.

          As for the training, you can try and they may repond in class or on the track the way you want, but their priorities change once they get in the field. Unfortunately outside of a simulator ( I've heard of one or two ) you're not going to get that point across I fear.

          Good Luck

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          • #6
            One track on which I've trained has a pretty smashed-up police car located in the infield, by one of the turns. It's an impressive enough crash (t-bone collision, driver's side), that just about everyone who drives there, ends up asking "what happened there?"

            The instructors go on to explain what happened - in this case, Ofc running code, didn't fully clear intersection, and smacked by guy doing 40+. The driver's side is about half as wide as it should be, and the Ofc. survived, but was medically retired out with serious injuries.

            Instead of sending the unit off to the wreck heap, they towed it out to the infield and leave it there as a "conversation piece." Although this might not sink-in with all rookies, seeing an actual smacked-up car (that's not had the interior cleaned / prettied-up), may actually sink in with a few. It may come as close to "putting a face on the issue" as you can.

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            • #7
              The only problem I would have with that is the lack of a dedicated site. Finding totalled cars sure wouldn't be an issue

              I have brought in two folks to give victim impact statements, one is the wife of an officer who was off-duty and was killed by an officer who lost control in a pursuit, and another is one of our detectives whose Mother was killed in a pursuit in California several years ago. I also have put together a powerpoint about an incident we had last year in which one of officers was t-boned and almost killed by a driver fleeing from another officer. This includes a lot of photos of the patrol car, both inside and out. I'm hoping this will show them that they aren't invincible in a Crown Vic.

              I appreciate all the input. The current class graduates on December 18th. I guess time will tell if the changes I have made are beneficial.
              Government exists to protect us from each other. Where government has gone beyond its limits is in deciding to protect us from ourselves.

              Ronald Reagan

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              • #8
                You have to instill in their little pea brains, and over emphasize that it is not the speed that gets them to the call in a hurry, it is the careful manipulation of the patrol vehicle, coupled with the assistance of the emergency lights and siren, that they are able to arrive and assist.

                Speed is a killer. Overly extending their capabilities with a lack of experience will cause a traffic collision faster than anything else.

                Common sense, defensive driving and knowledge of the area are highly important.

                Does your program teach recruits how ineffective a siren is when approaching a vehicle with the windows rolled up, the air conditioner fan at full and the radio blaring? A good lesson learned!
                Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence!

                [George Washington (1732 - 1799)]

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                • #9
                  Yes, we actually do that. Some of them have short memories, though.

                  On a side note, I'd love to pick your brain about what it was like driving a 440 Polara with only a red spotlight and a wind siren...
                  Government exists to protect us from each other. Where government has gone beyond its limits is in deciding to protect us from ourselves.

                  Ronald Reagan

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                  • #10
                    Do you use have access to LEDS simulators?

                    Remind the officer's they're not helping anyone when they become the victim. Impart it's not IF the T/C will happen, its WHEN.

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