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  • Police Juridiction

    I was recently in Alabama. I saw signs that said "Police Jurisdiction" Can anyone tell me what this means and what its all about?
    Last edited by j706; 01-15-2010, 06:26 PM.
    "Laws that forbid the carrying of arms. . . disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes. . . Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man." - Thomas Jefferson

  • #2
    Police Jurisdiction

    I don't know if Alabama is the only state that has "police jurisdictions", but it has to be one of the very few that does. Basically, the police jurisdiction is an extension of city/incorporated town limits that allows the city or town to charge taxes at a much lower rate than within the city/town itself. How far the police jurisdiction extends beyond city/town limits depends on the population of the city/town concerned. Cities/towns with a population of less than , I believe it's 10,000 have police jurisdictions that extend one mile beyond the city limits, cities in excess of that figure have police jurisdictions that extend three miles past the city limits. Many cities/towns do not allow their police or fire departments to provide services in the police jurisdiction, so you have the question of taxation, and no city services. To the best of my knowledge, this situation has not been tested in the courts. That's rather surprising, and in a way I wish it would come up. It would be interesting to see how the courts would rule.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by PhilipCal
      I don't know if Alabama is the only state that has "police jurisdictions", but it has to be one of the very few that does. Basically, the police jurisdiction is an extension of city/incorporated town limits that allows the city or town to charge taxes at a much lower rate than within the city/town itself. How far the police jurisdiction extends beyond city/town limits depends on the population of the city/town concerned. Cities/towns with a population of less than , I believe it's 10,000 have police jurisdictions that extend one mile beyond the city limits, cities in excess of that figure have police jurisdictions that extend three miles past the city limits. Many cities/towns do not allow their police or fire departments to provide services in the police jurisdiction, so you have the question of taxation, and no city services. To the best of my knowledge, this situation has not been tested in the courts. That's rather surprising, and in a way I wish it would come up. It would be interesting to see how the courts would rule.
      I do not want to sound negative towards your state, but that is assanine as all get out. So if you have a bad crash just over the boundry do you have to stop or how does that work? What about pursuits ect?
      "Laws that forbid the carrying of arms. . . disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes. . . Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man." - Thomas Jefferson

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      • #4
        Police jurisdiction

        Yah, it's a little wierd. If you have a wreck in the PJ (Police Jurisdiction) best call to make is to Department of Public Safety. In all likelihood a Trooper will work the wreck. If the concerned city/town provides services in the PJ, Trooper Post contacts them, they work the wreck.

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        • #5
          Sorry, I missed the part of your question re: pursuits. If a city officer is in fresh, as in hot pursuit, he can chase anywhere in the state. His normal jurisdiction is limited to the county the city/town is in. Agency policy may limit a municipal officer's ability to pursue, but as far as state law is concerned, it's as I've outlined it. As a practical matter, the police jurisdiction thing doesn't really get in the way of an accident being investigated, or EMT services being rendered. The City of Montgomery for instance, while it won't work an accident in the PJ, routinely sends Fire Medics to an accident occuring there. The area DPS Post knows which entities will and won't service incidents in the PJ.They will govern emergency response accordingly.

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          • #6
            OK, thanks for your imput on that. Its strange how law enforcement is different thru out the states, but yet its still the same-Did that make any sense at all? Anyway thats what I like about this web site,checking out others PD's ways ,rules ect. Very interesting to me. Thanks brother and Stay Safe.
            "Laws that forbid the carrying of arms. . . disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes. . . Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man." - Thomas Jefferson

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            • #7
              Canada does not have such restrictions. Canadian Law Enforcement Officers get their powers as Peace Officers from the Criminal Code (a Federal compendium of basic criminal violations and powers of Courts, LEO and Corrections) which is administered by the Provinces.

              Most LEO/PO are appointed pursuant to Provincial law and Municipal Police Services are established pursuant to laws of the Province in which they are located Therefore, a member of a Municipal PS appointed as an LEO/PO has authority thorughout the Province in which they work to enforce the Criminal Code and most Provincial Statutes (liquor, hunting/fishing, traffic). As well, Municipal laws empower those Municipal PS LEO/PO to enforce that municipalities by-laws (noise, animal control, traffic).

              Provincial Wildlife/Conservation Officers, Commercial Transport Enforcement Officers and Tobacco/Fuel Tax Enforcement Officers are appointed pursuant to Provincial laws, and are generally restricted by Agency policy to enforcement of Provincial laws that they are most concerned with, as well as liquor and/or traffic laws, but have some limited Criminal Code and Federal Statute enforcement authority.

              Immigration Officers and Customs Officers are appointed pursuant to Federal law as LEO/PO and have authority thoughout Canada to enforce the Criminal Code and various Federal Statutues, but do not have authority to enforce Provincial Statutes or Municipal By-Laws.

              Regular Members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, however, are appointed as LEO/PO pursuant to the RCMP Act, granting us authority throughout Canada to enforce the Criminal Code and various Federal Statutes. However, pursuant to laws in all Provinces other than Ontario and Quebec, RCMP RM are further appointed by contract between those Provinces and the Federal Government as the Provincial (sort-of like State) Police for those Provinces, so have authority to enforce most of the Provincial Statutes. Further, certain Municipalities have entered into a contract with the Provincial and Federal Governments for RCMP RM to provide Municipal policing services.

              It sounds like we can get into some urinary discharge displays between Federal, Provincial and Municipal Law Enforcement Agencies up here, and there can be at times like elsewhere, but generally we all play nicely in the sandbox!
              #32936 - Royal Canadian Mounted Police - 1975-10-27 / 2010-12-29
              Proud Dad of #54266 - RCMP - 2007-02-12 to date
              RCMP Veterans Association - Regina Division member
              Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada - Associate (Retired) member
              "Smile" - no!

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              • #8
                here city police have jurisdiction 1.5 miles past there city limits. State Highway Patrol and Sheriffs Department have jurisdiction in the city and county. But generally city's handle there own calls, unless they call for backup, like on a bad accident or felony type call.

                but in my country all city officers are deputized, so they respond to calls in county, like accident assists what not. They just don't make arrests, they detain and turn it over to the county.

                County has jurisdiction 300 yards into bordering county.

                Bordering Country it stops at border, haha.. my county borders Canada. Believe it or not have responded to emergency calls that are in Canada..
                "What the problem is?"

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                • #9
                  It's similar in NC as well. We have jurisdiction within 1 mile of the city limits. We enforce laws out there, but if someone there calls 911 it just doesn't go to us. We do help on occasion with bad crashes, etc. out there though.

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                  • #10
                    Texas:

                    Statewide jurisdiction for all offenses except those under the Transportation Code

                    Constable and Sheriff Deputies, City Marshals, school cops, etc. have jurisdiction with the Transportation Code anywhere in their county. City officers have jurisdiction county-wide in any county where their municipality is located (Example, my town in only in one county, but I can work traffic (by law) anywhere in it. Dallas is in Dallas, Rockwall, and Denton counties, so, technically, a DPD officer could work traffic anywhere in those three counties)
                    sigpic
                    Let your watchword be duty, and know no other talisman of success than labor. Let honor be your guiding star in your dealing with your superiors, with your fellows, with all. Be as true to a trust reposed as the needle to the pole. Stand by the right even to the sacrifice of life itself, and learn that death is preferable to dishonor. ~ Gov. Richard Coke, October 4, 1876

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                    • #11
                      In CA we have 24-hour peace officer powers anywhere in the state. My city sits on the border of two counties. We regularly go between the two....we also occasionally assist on calls that occur near our city, but are in unincorporated county.
                      Other officer: Oh that's right, I forgot, you're God's gift to police work.
                      Me: At least someone recognizes it.

                      Turns out basic police work isn't so hard, you just have to leave the station.

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