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Proposal to add thee motors

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  • Proposal to add thee motors

    Hello all,

    I am currently assigned to my department’s traffic unit. Yesterday one of my LTs approached me and encouraged me to write a proposal to add three motorcycles to my unit. After asking some questions [to command staff], I received positive feedback. With that said, I was hoping that someone here could provide some assistance. Can someone provide me with a template and sample policy?

    Any help or advice is welcomed and much appreciated. Thank you and stay safe!!!
    Last edited by tcode3; 12-30-2015, 07:38 PM. Reason: Typeo
    Regret for the things we did can be tempered by time; it is regret for the things we did not do that is inconsolable. - Sydney J. Harris

  • #2
    Lots of things to consider.

    Selection process for officers.
    Motor school.
    Motorcycles. (Harley Davidsons and BMW's seem to be the most popular).
    Specialized equipment. (Helmet, radios, protective clothing)
    Maintenance. (More expensive than a car when it goes to the shop).
    Pursuit policy.
    Who gets to transport if someone is arrested?
    Other weapons? (Some around here have either short barreled shotguns or short barreled rifles).

    Pretty sure I didn't cover everything, but it gives you a starting point.

    Comment


    • #3
      Firecop ,

      Thanks for the reply. I have much to consider. Luckily only 2 of us needs to go to motor school and we have a civilian transport officer M-F. Pursuit policy is already taken care of as well. As far as the selection of motorcycle, My Deputy Chief does not like HD. At our previous agency we had HD, they spent more time in the shop then on the road... So not really sure about HD. He likes the BMW. I am hoping that we will get a say in what motor to use because officer safety and comfort are very important. I have been contact with a company that will up fit Yamaha FJR and the Kawasaki Concours. I still need to call Yamaha and Kawasaki to see if that will void the 3 year warranty. I do know that both have been used overseas for sometime. We will see... Again thank for the reply.
      Regret for the things we did can be tempered by time; it is regret for the things we did not do that is inconsolable. - Sydney J. Harris

      Comment


      • #4
        Two things to consider.

        Firecop mentioned expenses. They can be off the wall. Our policy was that flats do not get repaired. Instead, the bike gets a new tire. Each of our motors seemed to average one flat a week and the repair bills that crossed my desk for a replacement tire averaged around $175 per tire and that was back in 2002. I have no idea how much more they cost today. Everything on bikes is expensive. I kept kidding with my motor sergeant that we should invest in a BMW shop when we retire.

        As strange as it sounds, the other issue has to do with safe operating weight of the motors you select and who is qualified by body weight to ride them.

        We investigated a fatal crash involving a local PD motor who center punched a vehicle that made a left turn in front of him. The officer died and I had to present the results of our investigation to the Chief of that department and the head of his traffic unit.

        What we determined was the deceased officer was grossly overweight. When you added the weight of his vest, leathers, gun belt, and police equipment, it made him even heavier. In total, he was more than 120 pounds in excess of the safe operating weight for his bike. Our investigation determined that had his weight been within safe operating parameters, he would have been able to stop the bike in time and never would have hit the other vehicle in the first place.

        This concerned us because we used the same bikes (BMWs) and never realized how low the safe operating weight was for the motor. All of our bike cops were pretty skinny, but nonetheless, we went back and weighed them with all their batman gear on and found that as thin as they were, they were within five pounds of the safe operating weight for their motors.

        So to operate the motor safely, whoever you select, when wearing all their gear, must weigh in at or under the safe operating weight for the bike you purchase.
        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

        Comment


        • #5
          L-1 thanks for the info. that is defiantly food for thought.
          Regret for the things we did can be tempered by time; it is regret for the things we did not do that is inconsolable. - Sydney J. Harris

          Comment


          • #6
            As a side note, we are using Harleys now and most of the guys hate them. One of their biggest complaints is they start to wobble once you reach 70 to 75 MPH.
            Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

            Comment


            • #7
              L-1,

              Why would the admin order a bike that has a possible safety issue? I mean a wobble at 70 to 75 MPH, on the highway you reach that all day long. Were officers able to put any input on the bike selected?

              I am hopeful that if my proposal is approved, we will have some input on which bike to use....
              Regret for the things we did can be tempered by time; it is regret for the things we did not do that is inconsolable. - Sydney J. Harris

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tcode3 View Post
                L-1,

                Why would the admin order a bike that has a possible safety issue? I mean a wobble at 70 to 75 MPH, on the highway you reach that all day long. Were officers able to put any input on the bike selected?

                I am hopeful that if my proposal is approved, we will have some input on which bike to use....
                In California state government we are cursed by something known as the Office of Procurement. If a state agency wants anything over a certain $ value, it must send specs for the item to procurement who then sends it out for low bid. The problem is, procurement allows the specs to be tampered with.

                We can specify that the items we want must meet A, B, C, D, E, F & G standards. However, if procurement decides on its own that we don't need D and F, they will remove those standards from the bid without telling us. Similarly, a prospective bidder may come back and tell procurement that if they eliminate A, B & C and let them substitute X & Y, they can significantly underbid everyone. If it saves the state a considerable amount of money, procurement has been know to allow it.

                Often we don't know that the bid specs have been changed until the product has been manufactured and delivered to us in lots of hundreds or thousands (we're a big agency) and the money has been taken from our budget and paid to the vendor. Consequently, we rarely get exactly what we asked for.

                We have complained about this for years, but that's just how state government works where I am.

                We had a big problem with procurement changing the specs on $5,000 a piece walkie talkies that never worked properly on our new radio system. I am led to believe there was a mutiny after that and our agency bypassed Procurement and made a direct purchase on the next walkie talkie batch. I suspect there was a sh*t storm after that.

                If you are a small agency you should not have such problems. Our bids are based on performance standards. In other words, we say the bikes must be capable of the following: A, B, C, D, etc., and then the manufacturers decide if they can produce let's say, 1,000 motors for us over a two year period that meet those specs, at the lowest price. OTOH, if you are only going for three bikes, you have the luxury of simply deciding which make and model you are comfortable with, what you want it outfitted with and putting that out to low bid.
                Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tcode3 View Post
                  L-1,

                  Why would the admin order a bike that has a possible safety issue? I mean a wobble at 70 to 75 MPH, on the highway you reach that all day long. Were officers able to put any input on the bike selected?

                  I am hopeful that if my proposal is approved, we will have some input on which bike to use....
                  It's a long-known problem with many HD bikes going back several decades and it is a design flaw that HD refuses to address or fix, but it can be fixed, though I would imagine that many departments won't fix it because it requires replacement of HD parts and modification of the chassis outside of HD's factory and warrantied specs, which might lead to other liability issues with insurance. It has caused deaths and numerous accidents, but many agencies stick with HD because of tradition, long-term investment in HD bikes over the years, and the unmatched network of service and support through HD dealerships. Where I live, you aren't likely to ever encounter a Motorcycle officer on any road where the speed limit is over 55 and sometimes they will go out on roads where it jumps to 65, but they rarely operate on those roads because patrol cars are better suited for those roads and the duties attached to them. Most of the time, you'll see the bikes sticking to suburban roads that top out at 35-45, where it's safer for them to operate and often only when the weather is relatively mild and sunny.
                  Last edited by Waffles1981; 01-03-2016, 03:00 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Waffles1981 View Post
                    It's a long-known problem with many HD bikes going back several decades and it is a design flaw that HD refuses to address or fix, but it can be fixed, though I would imagine that many departments won't fix it because it requires replacement of HD parts and modification of the chassis outside of HD's factory and warrantied specs, which might lead to other liability issues with insurance. It has caused deaths and numerous accidents, but many agencies stick with HD because of tradition, long-term investment in HD bikes over the years, and the unmatched network of service and support through HD dealerships. Where I live, you aren't likely to ever encounter a Motorcycle officer on any road where the speed limit is over 55 and sometimes they will go out on roads where it jumps to 65, but they rarely operate on those roads because patrol cars are better suited for those roads and the duties attached to them. Most of the time, you'll see the bikes sticking to suburban roads that top out at 35-45, where it's safer for them to operate and often only when the weather is relatively mild and sunny.
                    HD used to have a program (for smaller agencies) where they would rent fully outiftted motor to departments for $1 a year

                    That got them a lot of loyalty

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I spoke to my chief yesterday, he told me that we need to look at starting a motor unit. He advised me to submit a proposal. With that said, does anybody have a template they could send me? Thanks!
                      Regret for the things we did can be tempered by time; it is regret for the things we did not do that is inconsolable. - Sydney J. Harris

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The National Institute of Justice Programs is a good place to start looking for ideas, grants, funding and samples

                        http://www.nij.gov/Pages/welcome.aspx

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks Iowa....
                          Regret for the things we did can be tempered by time; it is regret for the things we did not do that is inconsolable. - Sydney J. Harris

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Iowa #1603 View Post
                            HD used to have a program (for smaller agencies) where they would rent fully outiftted motor to departments for $1 a year

                            That got them a lot of loyalty
                            They stopped that a few years ago.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I don't know if you've moved ahead, but my 2015 Electra Glide is rock solid up to it's top end. I used the BMW for seven years and loved the bike, but you have to consider the location of the dealership. It was a deal breaker having to drive 110 miles EACH way for service. Electrical system had a lot of failures too.

                              Comment

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