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Most Efficient Police Dog?

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  • Most Efficient Police Dog?

    I understand that K-9's have different functions, but which dog is best suited for the job when it comes to; Narcotics/Vice, Search & Rescue, Tracking people, Bombs, and I guess just general detering of crime.

    The reason I ask is because I see more and more Belgian Malinios on the street vs the German Shephard but I also know that Labradors and Blood Hounds are used as well. What other catagories might I be missing and what else is a deciding factor for which dog is best for a department?

    Any and all input appreciated.

  • #2
    That's like asking a room full of us which cruiser we like better!!

    We each have our own opinion on things..

    In my humble opinion, you see more mal's on the street, etc, etc, because their easier to find with the right drives for the above.

    It doesn't mean that the Belgian Mal is a better dog than a German Shepherd..

    I've seen great dogs from both breeds, I myself have had 2 mals and a german shepherd and like mal's.

    I would however pick the dog that has the best drives, personality, etc, etc, regardless of breed..
    "If you find yourself in a fair fight, your tactics suck"

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    • #3
      So drive and personality being equal, is one better than the other as far as sense of smell or agility? I figured it might be a very broad question. I'd like to be a K-9 officer if the department offered it, but until then I torture myself wondering all of these different questions.

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      • #4
        There is no "perfect breed"

        The US Dept of Agriculture uses Beagles ---------------------yep BEAGLES to sniff for illegal food stuffs

        The GSD /Mal argument basically is a personal choice of the handler or the department.

        Bloodhounds and LABS are normally used for police scent work....................but others work also

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        • #5
          I would have never thought of Beagles. Thanks for everyones input.

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          • #6
            One of the best K9's I ever saw was a Giant Schnauzer. As others have said, there is no perfect type of dog. It really comes down to the handler and the training. Malinois are great dogs, so are shepards. I've seen labs, rotts, dobermans, bloodhounds, boxers, and akitas.
            Originally posted by kontemplerande
            Without Germany, you would not have won World War 2.

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            • #7
              One of our best Explosive Detectors is a pitt bull, its about drive.

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              • #8
                SRT, I have only seen 2 Giant Schnauzer's work in my life and brother let me tell you they were superb!!! I would have taken either one of them in a heartbeat!!!

                I really couldn't believe the hype the 2 handlers were talking, but they backed it up and more!! I will tell you, the first hit I seen on a sleeve, my jaw had to be picked up..

                Both of them were the most social animals on the planet as well, but when it was time to work, they weren't playing..

                I think when you find one that is capable of dual purpose police work, it's going to be a great dog.. They are so far and few between though..

                Like I've said, im a mal guy, but breed isn't the thing that matters!!

                It's all about drives plain and simple!!!
                "If you find yourself in a fair fight, your tactics suck"

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                • #9
                  Generally Shepherds and Mal's are the best rounded for all these attributes. Good noses, enough toughness for a fight, and easy to work with. These dogs are also smart and work hard for their handler. There are lots of good breeds of dogs but for the money these two have the most well rounded of all qualities. Someone using beagles and labs are simply wanting detection work. Beagles and labs rarely if ever make a good bite dog and are liked for their people friendliness.

                  Labs, bloodhounds, etc. have great noses but generally dont have the size, with the exception of the lab, to be effective bite dogs. Labs are generally not very mean and if they will bite wont have the hang on through a beating fight drive the mals and shepherds will have. If I wanted a school dog to be around kids and sniff lockers and cars Id take a lab. For patrol work give me a shepherd or a mal any day.

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                  • #10
                    I agree with the others-there is no one breed that is THE most efficient.
                    Now you have to realiz that unlike civilan K9s LE dogs aside from the obvious traits need to be easily guidable so as to transition from pet to working dog quickly. We all have our favorites & generally GSDs & Mals are the dominating breeds but I've seen Dobes used (still), Giant Schnauzer, Boxer, Rottweiller and even mutts used in the patrol function. Years ago there was a PD that had an Akita, the French tried using Dogue de Bordeaux and the British used Airedales during WWI & II. Truth be told, the Bouvier de Flanders was the first civilan LE dog & yes, you can find some of them used, still. Unfortunatly many of these breeds have had their skills for LE bred out of them so they're hard to find in working circles, but occassionally you'll see them. Keep in mind too, that there are breeds you'll never see in the U.S. that some places use.

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                    • #11
                      Iowa,

                      Yep. Beagles. Years ago, coming back from SA, I had some jerky in my bag. USDA doggie hit right away and made a beeline for my gear. Then it got side tracked by the hippie fool with the fresh fruit HE was bringing back from SA. So I just kinda moved slooowly away...hehehe. (phew). Smuggler One. Hippie ZED.
                      Free Deke O'Mally!!!

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                      • #12
                        My canine was a passive response Golden Retriever from U.S. Customs. He was a donated to Customs from an organization called Paws with a Cause to Customs because he flunked out of their training program. (He was kennel aggressive). He had a sister that was also donated to Customs as a currency dog. My canine was trained as a single purpose narcotics dog. He worked for 9 years and retired at 11. He is still kicking at 13 enjoying his retired life. I really don't think its the breed as much as the dog and the drive. Training plays a big part in it too. Keeping it fun for you and your dog are very important. My Instructor at Custom's always said "if the dog figures out that he wasn't playing and is working you are in trouble". My dog hasn't worked in over 2 years but I think if I took him out today looking for dope he would still be all over it. (Maybe a little slower).

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                        • #13
                          +1 on "depends on the individual dog".

                          For the intended purpose of the team:
                          Proper: genetics+socialization+imprinting+training+handlin g= Successful Team.

                          Each of these variables plays a role...often a higher quotient of one factor can help balance out a lower quotient of another.
                          http://www.facebook.com/workingdogsnh
                          www.vandesterke.com

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Tim Connell NH View Post
                            +1 on "depends on the individual dog".

                            For the intended purpose of the team:
                            Proper: genetics+socialization+imprinting+training+handlin g= Successful Team.

                            Each of these variables plays a role...often a higher quotient of one factor can help balance out a lower quotient of another.
                            Had this conversation the other day with someone who is not a handler. I am in the process of testing a green dog right now for my new dual purpose. My first dog was a 95lb GSD. The dog I am testing now, another GSD, is about 70lbs soaking wet, and is done growing. I got the comments, "wow he is small" and how he isn't intimidating like my old dog.

                            I have to admit I was skeptical when I first saw him, until I tested him. The best way I can describe him is a Mal in a Shepherd's body. He has crazy prey and hunt drive, and seems like an instinctive tracker. He does not look like he would hit hard, but he is so fast, he hits with a lot of force.

                            I wasn't set on getting a Shepherd or a Mal, I wanted the best available. When it comes down to it size/breed really wasn't a factor, it comes down to what the dog's genetic make up is. He either has it or he doesn't. You have to know what you are looking for when testing dogs.

                            I was used to having a titled dog, but going green is definitely a new and challenging experience!
                            "In valor there is hope"

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by borninblue View Post
                              Had this conversation the other day with someone who is not a handler. I am in the process of testing a green dog right now for my new dual purpose. My first dog was a 95lb GSD. The dog I am testing now, another GSD, is about 70lbs soaking wet, and is done growing. I got the comments, "wow he is small" and how he isn't intimidating like my old dog.

                              I have to admit I was skeptical when I first saw him, until I tested him. The best way I can describe him is a Mal in a Shepherd's body. He has crazy prey and hunt drive, and seems like an instinctive tracker. He does not look like he would hit hard, but he is so fast, he hits with a lot of force.

                              I wasn't set on getting a Shepherd or a Mal, I wanted the best available. When it comes down to it size/breed really wasn't a factor, it comes down to what the dog's genetic make up is. He either has it or he doesn't. You have to know what you are looking for when testing dogs.

                              I was used to having a titled dog, but going green is definitely a new and challenging experience!
                              So true. The old saying "It's not the size of the dog, but the size of the fight in the dog" (or however that goes) is true in some cases.
                              I have had GSD's and now have both Mals and GSD's. Each have their advantages and disadvantages, but the last variable is the handler. Which dog is best suited to a particular handler, training style and ability for the task at hand? Sometimes if a high intensity dog is paired with a handler that can't work the dog to it's full potential, it's kind of like the proverbial "Monkey driving a racecar" syndrome.

                              It will be great for you to work him from the green stage, then you know all of his experiences, good and bad, and really know your dog's behaviors. Sometimes with a pretrained or titled dog, you never know the type or quality of the training, so it's sometimes a crap shoot. I've seen "titled" dogs that had probably never seen anything but a kennel and a flat grassy trial field. Sport dogs and police dogs are two different spectrums...not that some titled dogs don't evolve into great real world dogs...but it's all about the environmental exposure, in my opinion it's a huge factor lending to their stability.
                              http://www.facebook.com/workingdogsnh
                              www.vandesterke.com

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