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    I would like to know who has trained in martial arts and what styles you have trained in. I am highly considering starting Jiu Jitsu or Judo for further knowledge in survival techniques on the streets. I would also like to know encounters other officers have had with suspects and what your training helped you with either survive or give you the upper hand.

    Thanks

  • #2
    I've been doing brazillian jiu jitsu for a few months now. You'll notice a rapid improvement pretty quickly if you stay dedicated, especially if you can do private or small group lessons. A lot of the takedowns are things you can do fully kitted up, even with a rifle.

    However, I'd also suggest finding a gym that also does kickboxing/mma or the like, as there are some things in bjj that won't be applicable to you on the street, and you'll need the striking as well.

    Most importantly though is to make sure you are going to a vetted gym. If it's not endorsed by the Gracies or another large national group, I'd stay away. Many places have jumped onto the "mma" bandwagon and tout themselves as bjj or mma professionals, and they'll teach you nothing but how to get yourself hurt. Similar to the lack of vetting for most martial arts in America, you'll need to do your homework.

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    • #3
      +1 for mma/ bjj ... Judo is cool, but not always applicable. Plus how many times have you been hit in the face? Never? Once? It's very eye opening to spar and get popped in the nose. Good to know what you're going to do in a controlled environment. You don't have to compete and a good gym won't pressure you. But sparring and taking your licks is amazing for self confidence. Plus learning takedowns body positions/how to roll may save your life one day.

      +100 for going to a vetted gym. Many big cities have UFC contract fighters in them. Easiest way to find out places to go, look them up see where they go.

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      • #4
        I have studied BJJ, Krav Maga, and some other martial arts for about 5 years. It is important to find the martial art that works best for your body type and ability. I like to study different types of martial arts and find out what works best for me, taking pieces from each discipline I study.

        BJJ is a good general martial art, but as mentioned before needs to be supplemented with a some standup work. BJJ is designed as a sport, but obviously has practical application. Just don't get into the mindset of waiting for the person to tap.

        +++ for going to a reputable gym. I would argue that it doesn't have to be endorsed by the Gracies or other national organization, but definitely do your homework on the lineage of the instructor. The BJJ world is a very interesting community.
        "Respect is earned. Honesty is appreciated. Trust is gained. Loyalty is returned."

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        • #5
          I've been studying for some 20 years and counting. Started with taekwondo, judo and went unto 5 different styles of kungfu(wing chun being my favorite there). Currently I concentrate on hapkido(Korean version of japanese aiki-jijutsu and aikido...all joint locks) and filipino stick/knife fighting( specifically Modern arnis and Pekiti Tersia Kali). The filipino single stick stuff works awesome with the telescopic baton we're issued. Also I carry two tactical folding knives hidden on my person and can use my knife skills if it comes down to that. You have to look at different arts and see what they offer, and decide if its what you would like to have in your repertoire. Personally I never jumped on the mma bandwagon. The ground is the last place I want to be in with a duty belt on. I train to getting up from the ground and not staying there. I can access my edged weapons pretty quickly and put my training to good use should I every get taken down... but that's just me. There's alot of stuff out there that's very applicable to the job so keep an openmind and do alot of research to see what you are comfortable doing.
          Last edited by usmc_0352; 06-22-2014, 11:06 PM.

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          • #6
            I prefer judo. I really enjoy driving someone into the ground, which is the main point of the sport. I wrestled in both middle school and highschool (regrettabl didn't wrestle in college). I was at an mma gym for 4 years where I competed in judo, submission wrestling (bjj without the gi) and wresling. I've also trained at a boxing gym. I've thrown a few people at work, it ends the fight pretty quickly.

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            • #7
              I enjoyed Kung Fu ( Choy Li Fut) when I was able to take it. Id love to take Krav Maga.
              I yell "PIKACHU" before I tase someone.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Copper86 View Post
                I would like to know who has trained in martial arts and what styles you have trained in. I am highly considering starting Jiu Jitsu or Judo for further knowledge in survival techniques on the streets. I would also like to know encounters other officers have had with suspects and what your training helped you with either survive or give you the upper hand.

                Thanks
                I watched three seasons of "Walker, Texas Ranger." I'm legit.

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                • #9
                  "usmco352" pretty much covered it. But there's a caveatr here for any martial artist--your dept. Some dept.'s restrict what you can use to what you learn at the Academy and deep in their Operations Orders have specific verbage to that effect. It happened to a Sgt. here long ago. Some agencies will even secifically prohibit you from learning certain arts. I could see a problem with carving up or stabbing a suspect, although personally it makes sense to me. My agency specifically prohibits Krav Maga.
                  I studied Judo for years, Tae Kwan Do for about a year & found the grappling arts seemed to work best. If I had to do it over again I think Hapkido or aikido would be best for LE. I suggest you ask one of the instructors at the Academy or perhaps the Chief this question. That way if & when you break an arm or snap-kick some suspect you'll have a defense besides: "Well, my sensei taught me it!"

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                  • #10
                    I have studied a couple of martial arts over the years. The two I like most and the ones that seemed to blend well with either FBI Arrest Control or the current, required PPCT are Ed Parker's American Kenpo and Kukenbo Karate. I have never tried Jujutsu (I have seen a couple of ways to spell this, not sure what is correct) but I think it would be worth learning just because MMA is so popular right now. You never know who might be knowledgeable (enough) to wreck your day by getting an unsuspecting officer (or you) in a ground and pound situation. There is so much to chose from that would be good for either fitness or defense/offense or both that it would be hard to go wrong.
                    Last edited by Shin71; 12-08-2014, 03:35 AM.
                    Vengeance is not justice...

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