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Do you respond to medical calls?

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  • Do you respond to medical calls?

    We had a debate with our Chief today at our staff meeting. He wants us to respond to medical calls. Now, how many of you respond to those? Is it in your policy? Do you do it on your own? Now, I understand that it depends on the call..assault, etc.. But everyday run of the mill medical calls. I would like to know your opinions, policy, etc. thanks!

  • #2
    My department goes on every medical call that goes out. We're a small department in a small town. We usually get 3 to 4 medical calls a shift. Our chief loves it. Sometimes its so quiet that every officer wants to go to the call just for something to do. We always beat EMS to the location of the call. We arrive and give a patient update, tell dispatch to relay any more additional info, advise EMS which way to enter the premesis, such as campground, condo area, hotel room number. Ive noticed that people seem to have a peace of mind that a first responder has arrived, and we assure the patient that EMS will be there in any second. Its comforting to the family to know that the police are there, and that someone of authority/trained in basic first aid is there. Due to this, I get about 3-6 code 3 runs a shift.

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    • #3
      We only respond to life or death med runs. A person choking, not breathing, seizures, things of that nature. Otherwise we don't even receive a call.
      Today's Quote:

      "The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits."
      Albert Einstein

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      • #4
        Originally posted by mdrdep View Post
        We only respond to life or death med runs. A person choking, not breathing, seizures, things of that nature. Otherwise we don't even receive a call.
        The only other time is if the fire department requests deputies respond for say a forced entry or a "problem" location.
        Carpe Noctem

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        • #5
          We respond, and HAVE to write up a report about it......anykind of call for service, is a report.......fun..fun..fun..

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          • #6
            We respond if nothing else is holding. Normally we do "scene security" for the fire/ambulance crews. Also, often the locations are secured and we obtain entry for the med crew. We additionally secure the location and residence upon completing the call if the person is transported.

            I'm the one member of my department with advanced medical training, so I tend to drift to those calls more than my fellow officers. Alot of times the med crew is short-handed so if they know I'm on scene, they can roll and I assist with the patient(s).

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            • #7
              EMT certification is encouraged, paid for, and compensated with a stipend. We carry AEDs and BLS medical bags, including oxygen. We also have a close working relationship with our EMS agency. "Rendering first aid to the sick and injured" actually is in our patrol policy. We don't have any formal EMS response policy though.

              I have the luxury of going on medical calls since it's rare to have one police call holding, let alone ten (and even if there was one holding, it would probably be a barking dog complaint). Anyhow, I enjoy medical calls -- even the "general illness" runs and "lifting assistance" requests. It's one of the rare times where we have a positive, meaningful interaction with the public. I might reconsider that if I were in a more urban area where EMS is abused -- your mileage may vary on that one, depending upon your jurisdiction.

              Regardless, if you don't have AEDs in the cruisers, fight to make it happen. The life you save just might be your partner's -- or your own. Time is muscle -- every 60 seconds that pass after sudden cardiac arrest roughly translates into -10% chance of survival.
              Last edited by Resq14; 09-06-2007, 03:39 AM.
              All Gave Some - Some Gave All

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              • #8
                NO! Thank god, the answers no. Way to dangerous being around those guys,it surprises me everytime they "arive alive"
                "Laws that forbid the carrying of arms. . . disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes. . . Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man." - Thomas Jefferson

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                • #9
                  Our SOP states that if the EMS call is in specific areas of town (they are spelled out specifically in policy, but basically the projects) then we have to respond with EMS and/or fire. This is due to the number of assaults on EMS; or their trucks being robbed.
                  sigpic

                  I don't agree with your opinion, but I respect its straightforwardness in terms of wrongness.

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                  • #10
                    like mdrdep and EMVAMPYRE we do pretty much the same thing.....we only respond when ems requests us or the person is down for unknown or reasons like mdrdep said...we do not run code to a person down call though...that is what ems is for...also, if i wanted to respond to medical calls i would have been a firefighter

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                    • #11
                      We also respond to every medical call.

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                      • #12
                        My agency is also a small one, and we likewise, respond to medical calls. My agency serves a city of 2000 people, in a rural county. An ambulance is at best, 10 to 15 minutes away. Our rescue squad is attached to our volunteer fire department and their response varies from day to day, some days no one responds.

                        Many times, we arrive just to reassure the victim and to make sure there is no llife threatening events in progress. Our only responsibility then is to gather info to aid the medics in their diagnosis and to help shag equipment if needed from the ambulance.

                        We also respond to "I've fallen and I can't get up" calls, both at the local "rest home" and to private residences. It is good PR for the agency and the health care workers love the help.

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                        • #13
                          Great. Thanks for the responses. Coming from a large agency to a smaller one, we did not respond to medical, unless requested. Now, in the smaller agency, we may have to go to a majority of them. We do have a full time FD. I also understand the politics of responding to these calls. We are attempting to set a policy for what calls we do respond to...Not the " Fever and chills" calls...

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                          • #14
                            I'd say the majority, depending on the call. We're a small agency; like someone said, it's something to do. However, our county sends emergency tones for every ambulance run, even a transfer from our hospital to a bigger one in a larger city. Of course, we ignore these.
                            If trees could scream, would we be so cavalier about cutting them down? We might, if they screamed all the time, for no good reason.

                            ---Jack Handey

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                            • #15
                              Not usually, unless foul play is suspected, or if traffic support is needed. So we do respond to some. IF it's at a home, it's an officer's discretion...they page out first responders.

                              I would suspect that your Chief wants to increase the number of calls for service he answers to justify either a raise or the number of cops he has.

                              But, if there was an incident that was thought to be an accident and later turned out to be a criminal act, could be there's pressure.
                              "Say hal-lo to my leetle frahnd!"

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