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Any experience with Mexican law enforcement?

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  • #31
    CCCSD, I know you've been here less than half as long as I have, but I think you'd have to admit, I'm a pretty patient man. I've been pretty patient with you crapping all over my thread, mostly because I like you, and I think just about everything you do is funny.

    If you noticed, my question was directed to those who actually have experience in Mexico, to which if you had any response at all, probably should have just been a simple "No.".

    I can ignore i.am.A.troll- he's probably just gonna do something dumb and get himself banned again anyway. But I'd appreciate it if you could give it a rest here, buddy...

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    • #32
      We've been asked to join one of the best race teams, for the 2022 Baja 1000!

      At this point, I'm not sure what our duties will be, other than crafting margaritas at the end of each day. I think we'll even be sleeping inside!

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      • #33
        Have fun, sounds like a great invite!

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        • #34
          Mexican cops are pulled from all different angles. Even if they have joined to truly be a public servant, they have to pay 'quotas' to their superiors, other government types and to narcos. The environment of Mexico just isn't conducive to effective law enforcement.

          I know many who've driven just across into border towns, have driven into the interior or have rented vehicles in resort coastal towns, and all of them have had negative stories. A US registered vehicle is a neon sign just begging for type of drama. If it isn't for the cops, then it could be narcos running a certain area controlling entry.

          So overall, I wouldn't do it myself, especially being a US LEO. For most of my career, officers of our department were all marked for death, so knowing that, Mexico doesn't exist for me as a destination.

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          • #35
            I just got back home to central Texas, from the 2022 Baja 1000.

            I took a few minutes to re-read this entire thread, and the "Chicken Little" posts are cracking me up.

            It was fine.

            I had both positive and negative experiences with law enforcement, but none of them were of any material consequence.

            I was not able to caravan with the rest of the team when I entered Mexico. And my wife was not able to make the trip, for medical reasons. After lockering my pistol with CBP in San Ysidro and crossing the border, I found that the "highway" through TJ is actually just surface streets. A pair of municipal police officers spotted a single occupant in a lone vehicle with a Texas license plate, and stopped me to shake me down. They take off their badges and name tags when they do that. He didn't speak much English, I only know a few words of Spanish, and I pretended not to know any Spanish, which made it very hard for him to communicate any proposition to me. Through a roadside game of Charades, he tried to tell me that the Baja bumpers on my truck were not legal in Baja (which is total BS). He tossed my truck and had me empty my pockets, but all of my cash was hidden. I sensed that he suspected I was an American cop (through my demeanor), and when he spotted me memorizing the license plate of his patrol vehicle, he quickly terminated the contact and let me go.

            I passed through military checkpoints countless times as I drove back and forth between Ensenada and San Felipe numerous times, and nothing ever happened, except for being told that I need to roll down ALL the windows when I approach, not just the driver's window. On race day, they pretty much just waved us through if we looked like we were participants.

            On the day that I pre-ran the course from Zoo Road down to Highway 5 about 50 miles south of San Felipe, there is no cell service down there, my team-issued hand-held VHF radio didn't work, and I didn't take a team satellite phone because I didn't know the VHF didn't work down there. When I came out off of the course onto the highway, a pair of municipal police officers stopped to check on me. I expected to get shaken down again, but they were very nice and just wanted to make sure I was okay by myself that far out. I had days and days of water, food, warm clothing, sleeping bag, flares, fire-starting stuff, plenty of gas, tools, and everyone on the team knew EXACTLY where I was going, so I was never in danger, but it was nice that they stopped to check on me.

            The Mexican Army, National Guard, Marines, and various local police agencies, all patrolled heavily. The military ones did it in technicals with side-facing bench seats for 6-8 soldiers armed with select-fire battle rifles, and tubular steel cages, often with pintle-mount belt-fed machine guns at the front, some as big as the Browning M2 .50 caliber.

            The biggest hassle was when I tried to cross the border at TJ. The street cops in yellow shirts were all trying to extort money from Americans to let them get in line to cross the border. I refused to pay, and they sent me away, directing me down a road that took about 5 miles before I could turn around and come back towards the border. It took me hours to figure it out, but I was finally able to get in line without giving up any money. They were also occasionally shaking down Americans already in line, but they didn't target me. Next time, I'll find a better place to cross the border.
            Last edited by Aidokea; 11-28-2022, 03:22 PM. Reason: Spelling

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            • clof2001
              clof2001 commented
              Editing a comment
              Glad you had a good trip. Next time try crossing back over at Otay Mesa border crossing. It's about 10 miles to the east and primarily for commercial trucks but regular autos can go through. I've heard the wait is usually 30-45 minutes.

              The only downside is I don't believe CBP has a place you can check your firearm in, so you'd still have to drive back over to the San Ysidro side. But for coming back home at least might be worth it saving a couple of hours...

            • Aidokea
              Aidokea commented
              Editing a comment
              Thanks. That sounds like a better option.

          • #36
            Originally posted by Aidokea View Post
            The biggest hassle was when I tried to cross the border at TJ. The street cops in yellow shirts were all trying to extort money from Americans to let them get in line to cross the border. I refused to pay, and they sent me away, directing me down a road that took about 5 miles before I could turn around and come back towards the border. It took me hours to figure it out, but I was finally able to get in line without giving up any money. They were also occasionally shaking down Americans already in line, but they didn't target me. Next time, I'll find a better place to cross the border.
            Genuine question: Was your refusal to pay to get in line a matter of principle for you? Pride? A personal challenge to see if you could figure out a way to avoid paying? Some other reason?

            It can't be for financial reasons since you're loaded. And whatever amount they demanded would probably be all but a drop in the bucket compared to the overall cost of this adventure. I cannot imagine it made practical sense to waste half a day waiting in line to save a few bucks.

            Out of curiosity, how much did they ask for?

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            • #37
              Take a shot of immodium and swallow an apple air tag just before you cross the border.

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              • #38
                Shoulda tinned them …

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                • #39
                  ^^^^^^^
                  Ha!

                  Fully explaining how US commissions fully trump all foreign authority, even in their home country,………

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                  • #40
                    Originally posted by NolaT View Post
                    ^^^^^^^
                    Ha!

                    Fully explaining how US commissions fully trump all foreign authority, even in their home country,………
                    Especially TEXAS LE!

                    Comment


                    • #41
                      I went to mexico in the early 90's with a bunch of young cops. Our antics attracted the attention of the policia at one point which was settled with gifts of NYPD tee shirts and hats brought along for just such an occasion.

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                      • #42
                        I've never been to Mexico, and don't intend to visit. Nothing would surprise me about the cops there, though. We were "taxed" by transit cops in Milan, Italy back in '07. All of the social justice warriors yelling ACAB here need to travel abroad and get a dose of reality.

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                        • #43
                          Thanks for the update.

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