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  • Emotional Intelligence

    There is a topic that is near and dear to my heart, that being mental wellbeing. I am sure this comes to no surprise to anyone here, but we as law enforcement professionals, and more collectively as first responders, struggle sometimes to maintain our wellbeing. What's sometimes visible to the outside world is not so apparent to ourselves. I should know, I've spent almost seven years as a cop in Minneapolis and have experienced my own critical incident and the riots of 2020. It took the perception and observations of someone I love very much to point out that I had dramatically changed as a person, and not in a good way. It was from this moment on that I knew I had to take ownership and bring on positive change into my life. And at the same time I asked myself if I could help anyone else who may have been in the same or similar situation? I couldn't possibly be the only one going through these changes, was I?

    So in January of this year I incorporated a nonprofit to introduce a concept I believe can help us all, Emotional Intelligence. If you are not familiar with Emotional Intelligence or what's commonly abbreviated as EQ, it is our ability to perceive, control, and harness the power of our emotions. It also gives us the insight or perception into the emotions of others. EQ is also a skill set and it's one that we can master. So you may be asking yourself, why is it important? I won't pretend to scare you into thinking that bad things can and will happen if you ignore your mental wellbeing, and instead we will look at the flip side.

    Those who have high levels of EQ will often find themselves making thoughtful and purposeful decisions. Their reactions are often wired for positive responses and rarely do their emotions hijack the decision making process. We forge better and stronger bonds with others. High levels of EQ also give us the perception we have more in control of our lives, situations and problems than we often give ourself credit for. And it's that control or ownership that allows us to take care of our wellbeing, both physically and mentally.

    My nonprofit Furos.org is bringing this training to fruition this summer. Our EQ course, or experience as I like to call it, will be provided at NO COST to the agency or individual. We are relying heavily on the fundraising aspect, which is going to allow us to keep it at no cost to the end user. The course will be available to first responders only, which we know includes LE, Fire, EMS and also Dispatch. We hope to have our pilot course by July and have the finalized version to roll out by September. Wether you represent yourself or your agency and you are truly interested, please visit our website to complete our form so we can place you on the waitlist. I will leave a link to the website at the bottom of the page. Thank you all for your time and take care each other and yourselves.



    Justin Schmidt - http://www.furos.org

  • #2
    What’s the Q stand for. Usually it’s quotient. You guys can’t even figure that out..?
    Now go home and get your shine box!

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    • ArchwayD
      ArchwayD commented
      Editing a comment
      That is a fair question as I did not address that detail. You are correct in that Q stands for quotient just as it is with IQ. Although it does not feature the word quotient in EQ, the Q is used to better align the meaning and for recognition purposes.

    • CCCSD
      CCCSD commented
      Editing a comment
      If you try to sell me your product, this type of lack of attention to detail results in a hard pass.

      Garbage.

    • ArchwayD
      ArchwayD commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for your interest, I'll move on.

  • #3
    I thought we could just wash our brains out with alcohol in the back parking lot after getting off in the morning...

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    • #4
      Several years ago our agency switched its training model from FTO to PTO. One thing the PTO model relies heavily on is the concept of emotional intelligence, and it works to incorporate skills from the start that help staff (civilian and sworn alike) to improve their mental well-being.

      While I don't love all aspects of the PTO model, I feel it takes a big leap forward in terms of recognizing that policing now is much different than when other models were developed, and requires the development of different skill sets.

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      • #5
        ....................
        Last edited by Georgetime; 04-06-2021, 08:25 AM.
        Be dangerous, and unpredictable... and make a lot of noise. - John Bush, Anthrax

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