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  • Cell Phones

    Here in NYS we have the cell phone law, no driving without a hands free device. What do you all think is more dangerous to the motoring public, talking on the phone while driving or pulling to the side of a four lane, limited access highway to take/make your call? It seems that 90 percent of the cars off onto the shoulder are not disabled vehicles but people on the phone. The way I see it, the entire time spent parked on the shoulder is inviting the rear end crash by a drunk or oblivious driver and then take into account trying to merge back into traffic when done. Just thought I would see what you guys think

  • #2
    We don't have that law across the board...they've got it limited to drivers under 18 I think (new law that started recently). I can't say that driving and talking has increased the # of wrecks because I really don't know...seems to me that the way y'all do it might not be all the much better, though.
    sigpic

    I don't agree with your opinion, but I respect its straightforwardness in terms of wrongness.

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    • #3
      Yeah, seriously, cause how many officers are killed while stopped on the side of the highway...and thats WITH strobes and flashers to warn other motorists.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by NY Troop View Post
        It seems that 90 percent of the cars off onto the shoulder are not disabled vehicles but people on the phone.
        How does one tell the difference between someone calling for a tow truck and someone having a more casual conversation?

        The case against driving while talking on the phone was made, so to speak, in the laboratory rather than in the field. There is no post-collision blood test for telephone use. Associating cell phone use with a particular collision would have to be based on self-reporting or cell phone usage records. Self-reporting, particularly against one’s self-interest, isn’t reliable. Checking cell phone usage records, even assuming someone noted the exact time of the collision, isn’t practical. We may observe an increase in collisions as more people use cell phones, but correlation isn’t causation.
        We can, however, put people in a driving simulator and measure their performance while they’re jabbering on the phone. When it deteriorates to a degree seen in drunks performing similar tests, it’s reasonable to say talking on the phone and driving don’t mix.

        I don't think we'll see much benefit from requiring the use of hands-free phones. The problem isn't driving one-handed, it's paying more attention to conversation than to driving.

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        • #5
          seventy 2002

          When you work on the expressway and part of your daily chores are to check on disabled vehilcles it becomes very clear the motorist is making or taking a personal call when you walk up and converse with them.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NY Troop View Post
            When you work on the expressway and part of your daily chores are to check on disabled vehilcles it becomes very clear the motorist is making or taking a personal call when you walk up and converse with them.

            Thanks for the clarification.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by NY Troop View Post
              When you work on the expressway and part of your daily chores are to check on disabled vehilcles it becomes very clear the motorist is making or taking a personal call when you walk up and converse with them.

              Thanks for the clarification.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Seventy2002 View Post
                I don't think we'll see much benefit from requiring the use of hands-free phones. The problem isn't driving one-handed, it's paying more attention to conversation than to driving.
                The best-known study I am aware of came out of a Utah university, although I can't remember which one. It concluded that the hazard of talking on a cell phone while driving was roughly equivalent to that of driving with a 0.10% BAC. The study made specific reference to the fact that it didn't matter whether or not a hands free device was in use. The distraction factor is the same.
                Tim Dees, now writing as a plain old forum member, his superpowers lost to an encounter with gold kryptonite.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by NY Troop View Post
                  Here in NYS we have the cell phone law, no driving without a hands free device. What do you all think is more dangerous to the motoring public, talking on the phone while driving or pulling to the side of a four lane, limited access highway to take/make your call? It seems that 90 percent of the cars off onto the shoulder are not disabled vehicles but people on the phone. The way I see it, the entire time spent parked on the shoulder is inviting the rear end crash by a drunk or oblivious driver and then take into account trying to merge back into traffic when done. Just thought I would see what you guys think

                  Im also in the WNY area and also have seen this type of thing. Although I dont work on a thruway Ive seen it where people are sitting in the roadway with their 4 ways on just because they are on the cell phone. "I didnt want to talk on the phone and drive, sir". Well just lets block the road so nobody can drive...that solves the problem!!! Also..do yourself a favor..dont talk and drive and make eye contact with me with the phone to your ear. Total disregard for the law=automatic ticket. I agree with the stats Tim Dees posted pertaining to cell pone use and drinking and driving. From what Ive seen it is true.
                  And the road becomes my bride.

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                  • #10
                    I wish we could get a law like that here in the Carolinas. I've seen some pretty stupid acts done by distracted motorists. The ones that crack me up are the ones when you approach the drivers side door and the driver does not have the manners enough to hang up while doing business with you. I noticed that at alot of deli counters now there is a sign "Please hang up cell phone prior to placing order". I think cell phones are over-rated and over-used.
                    I am a Native American of non-Indian decent.

                    Cleaning the pool, one gene at a time.

                    I'm on a 30 day diet. So far I've lost 15 days!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tim Dees View Post
                      The best-known study I am aware of came out of a Utah university, although I can't remember which one. It concluded that the hazard of talking on a cell phone while driving was roughly equivalent to that of driving with a 0.10% BAC. The study made specific reference to the fact that it didn't matter whether or not a hands free device was in use. The distraction factor is the same.
                      Follow up: It was the University of Utah, the BAC level was 0.08%, not 0.10%, and more information on it can be found here.
                      Tim Dees, now writing as a plain old forum member, his superpowers lost to an encounter with gold kryptonite.

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                      • #12
                        How about texting and driving? It really takes your attention away from your driving.

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                        • #13
                          Sgt here has handsfree phone and radio.
                          Not illegal here, but good idea.
                          We scream for fear of suffering silence. - Savage Garden

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by NY Troop View Post
                            Here in NYS we have the cell phone law, no driving without a hands free device. What do you all think is more dangerous to the motoring public, talking on the phone while driving or pulling to the side of a four lane, limited access highway to take/make your call? It seems that 90 percent of the cars off onto the shoulder are not disabled vehicles but people on the phone. The way I see it, the entire time spent parked on the shoulder is inviting the rear end crash by a drunk or oblivious driver and then take into account trying to merge back into traffic when done. Just thought I would see what you guys think
                            agreed. there should be a stipulation that you must pull off an exit ramp to make or receive a call. technically the shoulder is for "emergency stopping only" and a cell phone call is not an emergency. there's probably a section that covers it in the VTL, obviously you wouldn't go writing everyone but it would be good if someone gave you crap when you were checking on them.
                            -Sean

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by NY Troop View Post
                              Here in NYS we have the cell phone law, no driving without a hands free device. What do you all think is more dangerous to the motoring public, talking on the phone while driving or pulling to the side of a four lane, limited access highway to take/make your call? It seems that 90 percent of the cars off onto the shoulder are not disabled vehicles but people on the phone. The way I see it, the entire time spent parked on the shoulder is inviting the rear end crash by a drunk or oblivious driver and then take into account trying to merge back into traffic when done. Just thought I would see what you guys think

                              You don't have any regulations or laws against non-emergency stopping on freeways?

                              It's always interesting to me that people think that every phone call coming in has to become their immediate, number one priority. That's what voice mail is for in my opinion. There was a day, not too long ago, when no one had cell phones. Now every communication is a priority, no matter how insignificant.

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