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What do you expect of your supervisors?

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  • #16
    They need to remember they are now part of management. That seems to be the hardest part for a new supervisor, particularly one that works with the guys he was a cop with.
    Fairness does not mean covering up for the screwups. That's another major issue I've seen with new supervisors and sometimes with even older ones who never get it in their heads they are now management. When they cover up or fail to handle the screwups they're not being fair to those guys who are out there giving you a good days work at 110%. The good guys don't like working with the screwups as it just causes them more work. Fairness isn't covering for the screwup. Fairness is taking care of all his people but first of all to remember his loyalty to the dept.
    The worst part about being a supervisor is administering discipline. If they don't have the stomach to do it then they will never be effective supervisors. Their subordinates will see them as weak and they'll be walked over. That may not matter to some. You'll find a good percentage of new supervisors aren't there because they want to be supervisors but they just want the gold. If they can't do the unpleasant tasks then they'll never be supervisors, they'll just be the cop wearing gold.
    Last edited by ISPCAPT; 05-26-2007, 08:53 AM.
    183 FBINA

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    • #17
      1. Tell guys what you want done, not how you want it done.
      2. Give the credit for good stuff to guys under you, take the blame when they do something wrong.
      3. Don't just try to ship a problem officer to another precinct or shift, it's your job to try and make him into the officer you and the department need.
      4. Don't just tell guys when they have screwed up. Tell them when they have done something really good.
      5. Take as much of the admin BS off of them as you can.
      6. Stick up for them with the upper management when the UM comes up with some brilliant plan you know is a crock.
      7. A good *** chewing doesn't mean raising your voice or yelling, and never do any of those to a guy in front of the other guys.

      Those are just some that come to mind right away.

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      • #18
        -Lead by example.
        -Praise in public, discipline in private.
        -Don't use threats of discipline to achieve results. Offer positive reasons for doing whatever it is.
        -Your troops are human. They make mistakes, just like you have done plenty of times. How did you want to be treated by your sergeant when you botched something?
        -It's a great job, but it's a job, not our entire identity and life. Pay attention to your guys' emotional health and watch for signs that they are on the edge.
        -On that note, read "Emotional Survival" by Kevin Gilmartin ( www.emotionalsurvival.com ).
        -You are a supervisor. If you get tied up on your own stops and arrests, you are not available to do your job of supervising.
        -Your troops are not you. Don't expect them to do things your way. Allow them to have their own style - as long as it is legal, ethical and within policy.
        -Enforce policy. If a policy is flawed, unclear or just plain stupid, as a sergeant, you have more juice than the line staff to get it changed. Do so.
        -Every day at roll call, go around the room and let each officer tell about anything particularly interesting or unusual he handled the previous shift. Encourage group discussions. Everyone benefits.
        -Allow a looser roll call one day a week. For us, it's Saturdays or Sundays, since there is no civilian staff, brass, ridealongs or visitors who might walk through the room and be offended. Don't allow it to descend into sexual harassment or inappropriate racial remarks, though.
        -Champion your guys. If one of your officers does an outstanding job with a case, mention it at roll call. If you have an officer who has his eye on a detective slot, and is really earning the job, go down to the bureau and put in a good word for him.
        Last edited by ateamer; 05-26-2007, 10:09 PM. Reason: Forgot something
        Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

        I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

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        • #19
          Never, ever, discipline an officer in the presence of others, EVER. Never discourage someone from asking questions, treat as you expect to be treated. Personaly, I can't stand and will not accept discipline in the form of yelling or talking to me in a loud or angry tone of voice. I have made it clear to all that if I do something wrong, I want to be told , but in a calm, constructive manner, scream at me and the result will be less than acceptable to most rank. Its just common courtesy, no one is perfect, not even the rank.
          law dog

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          • #20
            Simple, let me know what your expectations are and hold me, everyone else, and yourself to them without exeption.

            If someone makes me aware of their expectations for me and I fail to live up to them... I can respect any reprercussions. At the same time...if anyone else including you fail to live up to that sime standard, I expect(and, I feel deserve) the same response.

            Nothing better than a sup that is WYSIWYG(what you see is what you get).
            War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself.
            John Stuart Mill (1806 - 1873)

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            • #21
              Originally posted by patroldog View Post
              Never, ever, discipline an officer in the presence of others, EVER. Never discourage someone from asking questions, treat as you expect to be treated. Personaly, I can't stand and will not accept discipline in the form of yelling or talking to me in a loud or angry tone of voice. I have made it clear to all that if I do something wrong, I want to be told , but in a calm, constructive manner, scream at me and the result will be less than acceptable to most rank. Its just common courtesy, no one is perfect, not even the rank.
              I used to tell any supervisor who was rude or yelled that if I could be polite to a criminal, I think he could be polite to me.

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              • #22
                When I got promoted I went out to celebrate with my buddy who was a retired Sgt. He gave me a few words of wisdom that I try to follow.
                -Lead by example; If your not willing to do it don't ask someone else to.
                -Smile and smile alot; a happy supervisor makes happy people.
                -Pay for their coffee or soft drinks or beer everyso often.
                -Be firm but fair.
                -Try to never yell at your people- you'll never get them back.
                -When the sh*t hits the fan- be there for them as their friend or their boss not both
                -Listen to them
                -Ask their opinion about things
                -Be honest with them.

                Most important
                -When they're right- back them completely no matter what it costs- right is right.
                -There'll be a time when you have to decide what side you're on- rank and file or administration- make the decision a good one because there is no going back.
                "When I held that gun in my hand, I felt a surge of power ... like God must feel when he's holding a gun. " Homer Simpson

                sigpic

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                • #23
                  Act like this job is important and really matters to you. No matter how jaded you are don't ever let the guys under you believe you are burnt out. A good Sgt. is an officers coach and biggest fan. Dont ever get tired of hearing your guys tell you about their latest bust. If your doing your job right the guys should be excited about telling you what they just did.

                  I like the idea of debriefing, whenever pratical, at the end of shift. You dont need to yell at an underperformer, just let the guy sit there next to the other guys on your squad and say he didnt do squat today while they are telling you about the arrests they made and the cites they wrote. No comment needed from you.

                  Another example of showing things matter is at the start of shift put out the court date for the day. You dont have to say "go write some tickets damn it!" The mere fact that you went to the trouble of looking up the court date sends the message loud and clear.

                  Done ever look for things to criticize. This is the number one mistake I think most Sgts. do. You cant talk to the Sgt. without them listening solely for the opportunity to point out your mistakes. Very soon your officers will stop talking to you. I am not saying dont discipline or point out mistakes, I am saying dont look for them. If someone makes a mistake you dont need to look for it, to see it. If you know what you are doing it will jump out at you without looking for it.
                  Originally posted by FJDave
                  GM, you have just set the bar that much higher for the rest of us in our witty, sarcastic responses. I yield to you! Good job, kind Sir!

                  District B13
                  "We are not cops nor Feds." yet he still poses as an officer Hmmmm


                  Grant us grace, fearlessly, to contend against evil and to make no peace with oppression.--WWII memorial

                  "I have loved justice and hated iniquity, therefore I die in exile."

                  Pope Gregory V II

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                  • #24
                    Jeez, guys, maybe I can just sit these next two weeks out....you're doing the best job of teaching, thanks for all the input. I'm going to print these out and share them with the class.
                    Last edited by Kieth M.; 05-28-2007, 03:17 AM.
                    "You're never fully dressed without a smile."

                    Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

                    Three things I know for sure: (1) No bad deed goes unrewarded, (2) No good deed goes unpunished, and (3) It is entirely possible to push the most devoted, loyal and caring person beyond the point where they no longer give a 5h!t.

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                    • #25
                      I guess it's just me---I expect a new supervisor to punk me in the *****, try to make his rep off of me, forget where he came from & not give a s#$%t about what's right or wrong--only what's in it for him.........

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                      • #26
                        Thanks, everyone who contributed.

                        They liked all you had to say...I think a couple of them are actually going to join us here at O.com!
                        "You're never fully dressed without a smile."

                        Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

                        Three things I know for sure: (1) No bad deed goes unrewarded, (2) No good deed goes unpunished, and (3) It is entirely possible to push the most devoted, loyal and caring person beyond the point where they no longer give a 5h!t.

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                        • #27
                          Bad supervision is hereditary (i hope thats how you spell it), so remind them that if their supervisor did not treat them with respect, that they need to break the chain and show people why they should turn to their supervisor and not run from them no matter what the rank.

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                          • #28
                            From an old time sergeant, long since dead-

                            "Sometimes ya gotta feed some cop a s**t sandwich. It's just the way it is. But ya don't have to act like you're enjoying doing it."
                            "The only means we possess to thank them is to try to be as good an American as they were. We might fall well short of their standard, but there is honor in the effort."

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