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My first day of retirement...

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  • My first day of retirement...

    Has been very, very nice. I woke up at 0330 and was so excited, I wasn't able to get back to sleep.

  • #2
    Welcome to Club UTB!

    People were warning me that it would be a huge adjustment, that I'd be bored, that I'd miss my work friends blah blah blah.

    They were wrong.

    I bought a Concept rowing machine as a retirement present and get at least 3,000 meters in a day. I've lost 7 pounds.

    Blood pressure has dropped from 140/90 to 120/80. My doctor is thrilled.

    Wife loves that I make dinner most nights and ease a bunch of other household burdens since she still works.

    I put in a drainage pipe for the basement sump pump. Been meaning to do that for five years. Probably would've cost a $1,000 to hire a contractor. Cost me $90 in pvc and tiles.

    Picked up a PT retirement hustle. Only four days a month, but pay is decent ($40/hour).

    Everyday is like Saturday. No rush to do anything. Can stay up as late as I want because the next day is like Sunday.

    General mood is 10X improved. No more fatigue. No more bureaucratic tedium. No more obnoxious or slug co-workers. No more dealing with the public and criminals.

    Eating better too- no more gas station food.

    Hope your retirement transition mirrors mine...



    It is not the well-fed long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and hungry-looking.

    -Julius Ceasar

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    • #3
      Congratulations! It can take a while to adjust to retirement.

      Getting up at 0330 or 0400? That just requires a brief visit to the toilet, then you can go back to sleep.

      Best regards!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Ratatatat View Post
        Welcome to Club UTB!

        People were warning me that it would be a huge adjustment, that I'd be bored, that I'd miss my work friends blah blah blah.

        They were wrong.

        I bought a Concept rowing machine as a retirement present and get at least 3,000 meters in a day. I've lost 7 pounds.

        Blood pressure has dropped from 140/90 to 120/80. My doctor is thrilled.

        Wife loves that I make dinner most nights and ease a bunch of other household burdens since she still works.

        Everyday is like Saturday. No rush to do anything. Can stay up as late as I want because the next day is like Sunday.

        General mood is 10X improved. No more fatigue. No more bureaucratic tedium. No more obnoxious or slug co-workers. No more dealing with the public and criminals.

        Eating better too- no more gas station food.

        Hope your retirement transition mirrors mine...


        Thanks, brother.

        That sounds like how this is gonna work out for me.

        I'm sure not gonna miss the office politics...

        Comment


        • #5
          Nine yrs downrange from retirement........................................

          I , too, do most of the cooking since my retirement

          The body is going to hell slowly but I am working on it by staying active. Type 2 diabetic last 4 yrs......

          I am in bed most nights by 1030 & up by 0630 or so by choice

          Originally posted by Aidokea View Post

          I'm sure not gonna miss the office politics...
          I just got deeper into office politics in the retirement gig.. The sheriff made me a member of the management team
          Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

          My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

          Comment


          • #6
            I drove away from the office and never looked in the rearview mirror. Enjoy

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BNWS View Post
              I drove away from the office and never looked in the rearview mirror. Enjoy
              I now work next door across the street from my old job..............................In 9 yrs I have been back inside the front door 3 times....TWICE I was paid by my current job to go there
              Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

              My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by BNWS View Post
                I drove away from the office and never looked in the rearview mirror. Enjoy
                Same here.

                I went home and deleted a bunch of phone numbers out of my phone that I'll never need again.

                Comment


                • #9
                  So in the end, no exit interview, and no retirement party, and I'm glad.

                  An academy classmate of mine did take me out to a really nice Mexican restaurant for dinner and numerous margaritas last night, and that was pretty special.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Aidokea View Post
                    So in the end, no exit interview, and no retirement party, and I'm glad.

                    An academy classmate of mine did take me out to a really nice Mexican restaurant for dinner and numerous margaritas last night, and that was pretty special.
                    Perfect.

                    My retirement party consisted of a dozen work friends at local bar on my last day. They wanted a speech. I said, "Be smart, be safe, and be lucky." Then I told them no one appreciates what they do everyday, except for each other.

                    A couple of us ended the night at a strip club and made it rain dollar bills for an hour. I hadn't been to a strip club in at least ten years. I forgot how much fun it was.

                    Something I haven't missed at all: the constant complaining. Every day there was some degree of collective bitching going on. Everything from the sandpaper in the john to whatever new brilliant idea management was rolling out. Misery loves company, and complaining was one of the few areas of common ground, but it was a downer. The only thing I have to complain about now is how good life is....
                    It is not the well-fed long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and hungry-looking.

                    -Julius Ceasar

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Congrats. As I understand us newbies are entering the career field that is much different than when you started your career decades ago.
                      in the words of the great Dave Chapelle...Hs3xTbM.png

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        From your posts I assume you were a manager.

                        The first two years will be great. No more waking up in the middle of the night for a minute or two every 15 minutes, worrying about budgets, mile marks, personnel issues, ctizens complaints, pending lawsuits, politicians, union troubles, etc.

                        You will get a lot of "honey do" project finished.

                        You will clean the house and garage of all the police crap you have accumulated through your career, separate that which has true meaning to you and start selling the rest on eBay or by taking road trips to various police collector shows throughout the country. You will drag the wife with you. At first she will enjoy the travel but after a while, she will like it as much as you like going with her when she buys draperies.

                        You will take a few vacations with the wife, being cautios not to deplete your retirement fund too quickly.

                        After two years, you will have gotten caught up on most everything and start to get bored. You will sit behind the computer all day, cruising the internet, going places online, seeing and learning new things and playing games. It will become an addiction to the point that you will start to ignore your household chores and you will start to put on the pounds from lack of activity.

                        By year three, you wife will notice and become annoyed that you are constantly underfoot. She will "suggest" that you find some meaningful activity that is outside of the house. When you fail to heed her suggestions, she will learn to develop a command voice and her suggestions will become much firmer, possibly followed by threats.

                        After a divorce attorney explains explains how much of your pension you stand to lose if your wife follows through on her threats, you will comply with your wife's suggestion and find a full time job in retirement, possibly working security at a topless bar. When your wife inquires, you will tell her you are working Executive Protection for several at risk individuals, that the confidentiality agreement you signed with your protectees precludes you from saying anything further and she should be happy you are out of the house.

                        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Epilog

                          By Year five, all the guys that used to work for you will get wind of your retirement job, but they won't understand that retirement is not the bed of roses they fantasize about. Instead of stopping to chat and ask what's going on, they will let their imagination fill in the blanks as many cops do. Then, some will start bringing rookies around, park in the shadows across the street from the strip joint, point you out and tell the younger officers, "That's Aidokea. He was one of our best cops. Everybody loved him. He made it to the top of the mountain and got to see the view. I don't know what happened after he retired, but now he's been reduced to a security guard in a ti**y bar. Let that be a lesson to you. Don't let that happen to you."
                          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                          Comment


                          • Aidokea
                            Aidokea commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Lol. You should write a book, Chief.

                        • #14
                          Originally posted by L-1 View Post
                          From your posts I assume you were a manager.
                          No. Just a lowly worker bee. But I am older, and when I got back into police work, I already had a long and successful history in business management behind me, so I know a thing or two.

                          The first two years will be great. No more waking up in the middle of the night for a minute or two every 15 minutes, worrying about budgets, mile marks, personnel issues, ctizens complaints, pending lawsuits, politicians, union troubles, etc.
                          For me, it will be no more waking up in the middle of the night worrying about a particular poorly-supervised, arrogant, narcissistic, emotionally fragile, and incredibly vain Napoleon-complex Lieutenant gunning for good officers like me, using the administrative investigation process as a weapon to further his personal vendetta against any officer that he just plain doesn't like on a personal level...with no repercussions for him just randomly flinging $hit against the wall to see if he can make anything stick. All of our other Lieutenants are great. According to Lieutenant Needledick's peers, he was an incompetent bully as an officer, an incompetent bully as a Sergeant, and is now an incompetent bully as a Lieutenant. I don't know why he feels so threatened by me...maybe he saw me in the shower naked in the men's locker room.

                          There will also be no more waking up in the middle of the night worrying about our Sergeants, just about all of whom are truly excellent human beings AND truly excellent line-level supervisors, coming to me unable to look me in the eye, apologizing to me for the fabricated bull$hit administrative investigations that Lt. Needledick has forced them to conduct against me. At least one of them was in tears, repeatedly telling me that "this is all his bull$hit", referring to Lt. Needledick's agenda.

                          And finally, no more waking up in the middle of the night worrying about whether my union representatives were going to be successful in making me whole through the grievance process, getting me back to where I should have been in the first place, if it were not for Lt. Needledick taking pot-shots at my career. Fortunately, we have had a 100% success rate. The only formal discipline that I have, was something that I did not grieve, because it was legit and was 100% my fault. My union rep just sent me a copy of a letter from the Mayor regarding the only outstanding issue that we're dealing with, ordering the chief to pay me back the days I was owed, removing all references to the offenses alleged against me by Lt. Needledick, and giving me back all the other associated things that go along with those types of actions.

                          You will get a lot of "honey do" project finished.
                          That's okay. I have an extensive vocational background in auto repair, and I learned a lot of home repair stuff from owning my own home for 20 years.

                          You will clean the house and garage of all the police crap you have accumulated through your career, separate that which has true meaning to you...
                          That happened on my last day. 150 pounds of crap gone.

                          You will take a few vacations with the wife, being cautios not to deplete your retirement fund too quickly.
                          We took our big vacations BEFORE I retired, when I was still making good money, and while we are still both young enough to be able to travel easily.

                          After two years, you will have gotten caught up on most everything and start to get bored. You will sit behind the computer all day, cruising the internet, going places online, seeing and learning new things and playing games. It will become an addiction to the point that you will start to ignore your household chores and you will start to put on the pounds from lack of activity.
                          We will see...

                          By year three, you wife will notice and become annoyed that you are constantly underfoot. She will "suggest" that you find some meaningful activity that is outside of the house. When you fail to heed her suggestions, she will learn to develop a command voice and her suggestions will become much firmer, possibly followed by threats.

                          After a divorce attorney explains explains how much of your pension you stand to lose if your wife follows through on her threats, you will comply with your wife's suggestion and find a full time job in retirement, possibly working security at a topless bar. When your wife inquires, you will tell her you are working Executive Protection for several at risk individuals, that the confidentiality agreement you signed with your protectees precludes you from saying anything further and she should be happy you are out of the house.
                          I don't see that happening. My wife has just had her fifth (and hopefully final) cancer surgery, after being diagnosed late last year at the age of 41. I'm feeling pretty guilty about all the nights she had to sleep alone, and we are both looking forward to spending the maximum amount of time together that God chooses to grant us.

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            I had to laugh at an old girlfriend's retirement predicament. Although we are no longer together, we are still fairly close and keep in touch.

                            She retired about eight years ago, met a civilian retiree and the two of them hit it off. They both sold their respective houses, moved to another state where the cost of living is much lower and quality of life is much higher, pooled their cash and bought a house together.

                            I went on a road trip last year and stopped to visit them. They had been in their new house for two years. When she invited me in, she whispered, "Don't freak out." The house was new, about 5,000 square feet and very clean. However, the entire house was filled with boxes, carefully stacked over six feet high so as to create a maze with aisles you could walk through. She explained they all belonged to her boyfriend and when they left California, the movers needed over 1,000 boxes to pack his belongings. Those boxes have sat where they are now for two years, waiting to be unpacked and put away. She stated her boyfriend wakes up, get on the computer and stays there all day until bedtime, refusing to unpack. I suggested several "inducements" to get him to unpack, but apparently the don't work with him.

                            Every time someone says they are retiring, I think of my friend.
                            Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                            Comment


                            • Aidokea
                              Aidokea commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Damn......

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