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  • Ratatatat
    replied
    Originally posted by SHU View Post
    I've thought about it and I can see myself working at Costco and not mind it. I love costco! I've also thought about going back to school and becoming an RN but I don't know if I want to deal with doctors every day. I diffenately don't want to do anything in law enforcement again.
    You're not the first person to mention becoming a RN after retirement. I have a friend who's chief of a 200 officer department, close to retirement, planning on becoming a RN when he hands in his paperwork.

    QUESTION: what's the attraction? Four more years of schooling then 40 hours a week of what? I'll tell you what: bedpans and IVs and nads hanging out of medical gowns. Plus, I've spent more than a few nights in hospitals recently (family members under care) and it seems like RNs are the PFCs of the medical world.... doctors don't seem to give them much respect, and neither do the patients. I simply don't get why anyone would want to transition to nursing after 25 years of dealing with blood and teeth on the asphalt and body fluids from only God knows where....

    Leave a comment:


  • L-1
    replied

    For many years I had a part time business buying, restoring and selling antique slot machines. (They are legal here in California) I had a three car garage as a workshop and showroom. At one point it was lined with 30 machines and looked like an old time casino.

    For someone who is mechanically inclined, the machines are not hard to fathom, were easy to restore and I got to travel the country and meet all sorts of people going to trade shows, auctions and to sell at antique shows.

    If you are handy with your hands you can find old things of any type to restore and sell. It will keep you busy, put some extra change in your pocket and feed whatever artistic need you might have.

    Of course with your Spanish speaking ability, you could serve as a volunteer at one of the service centers for illegals. (I'm going to run now before you shoot me.)

    Leave a comment:


  • scotty_appleton814
    commented on 's reply
    I LOVE THIS COMMENT. I'm soo sorry for your short commute!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • SHU
    replied
    I've thought about it and I can see myself working at Costco and not mind it. I love costco! I've also thought about going back to school and becoming an RN but I don't know if I want to deal with doctors every day. I diffenately don't want to do anything in law enforcement again.

    Leave a comment:


  • not.in.MY.town
    replied
    I still remember a high school guidance counselor telling us: "Don't make your hobby your career. If you do, what are you going to do on your time off?"

    Leave a comment:


  • orangebottle
    replied
    Regarding mixing work and hobbies:

    Before law enforcement, I worked in the outdoors industry. I regularly spoke to people that loved to hunt, fish, shoot, etc. They came up with an idea for a better mousetrap, got a little entrepreneurial, and started making a living in the industry. Most complained to me that the demands of running a successful business (sales, marketing, accounting, and more) left them with little to no time to engage in the activity that initially brought them into the industry. I once spoke to the owner of a very successful up-and-coming firearms manufacturer that hadn't been able to visit the range or go hunting in over a year.

    Same with outfitters/guides; they loved hunting or fishing so much they figured they could make a living at it. Then they found out that most of the job was nothing but customer service in the woods or on the water. If they were successful, they rarely got time to hunt or fish themselves. Some even lost the passion for the sport after enough years.

    In short, be careful when you decide to turn your avocation into your vocation. There can be a very thin zone where you get to participate in a field you find interesting without dimming the interest that brought you to it in the first place.

    Leave a comment:


  • PeteBroccolo
    replied
    I REALLY liked the Customer Shuttle / Parts Delivery driver job with the Chrysler dealer, as I kind-of like talking...to people. I was asked, and had no problem, with even picking up cut tree branches from the Dealer Principle's yard to bring back to the store to dump into the dumpster (his home was 1 block away from my home and further away from the store, so it was not a problem). The DP wanted me to re-organize the parts department (old building, needs to be replaced, which is apparently in the works), and I am kind-of into organizing stuff. Part of my duties was keeping the doorways clear of snow and ice, which, again, I did not mind doing. I was even willing to go out of town to exchange loaner vehicles with customers, or rescue clients before the tow truck arrived, and do so past the end of the business day, and had a key to lock the place up. I would certainly recommend it, as long as you do not have to work with an idiot that feels he can try to bully others; I was not cowered, but also was not going to stay and put up with it.

    I have no problem dealing with retail customers, for the most part; I HATE seeing customers wandering around with that look on their face of, "Now, where in the H e l l are those widgets, ffs?!", and it seems that no other staff are doing something as simple as greeting them, asking them if they need help, and taking them to where the widgets are, then I go back to being a warehouse troll.

    YMMV, and I fully admit that, since I am the only constant in my post-retirement work situations, I am not really fit for human consumption, but neither am I desperate and destitute. As long as my wife is happy with what I am doing, and I finally, kind-of, do as she asks / tells me to, I am good.

    Leave a comment:


  • PeteBroccolo
    replied
    Originally posted by L-1 View Post

    That one surprised me. Most law enforcement agencies down here have conflict of interest rules that prohibit sworn personnel from holding secondary employment, paid or not, in jobs involving the serving or sales of alcoholic beverages.
    I kind-of was living past the edge doing that, so, yeah...

    Leave a comment:


  • not.in.MY.town
    replied
    Originally posted by Retired96 View Post
    I have always enjoyed working in my yard, keeping my lawns perfect,,,always planting various flowers etc...So when I retired I started doing gardening for my neighbors...I don't just mow, blow and go like most of the non English speaking gardeners in So. Calif. I take care of their yards as if it was my own...Make a nice chunk of tax free money every month, get plenty of exercise...The only down side is the long commute from my own home....Its 150 yards to the house at the end of the street.
    No "take-home" riding mower to make the commute a bit easier?

    Leave a comment:


  • not.in.MY.town
    replied
    Originally posted by Ratatatat View Post
    I recently saw a job advertisement with "WANTED: FORMER POLICE AND FIREFIGHTERS" in bold letters. Further reading revealed it was for an organ harvest service, and the job entailed driving a van to local morgues and funeral homes, picking up the recently deceased, then driving the dead to the organ donor place where surgical technicians remove parts and pieces. I reckon they figure former LE and Fire are more responsible drivers and more likely to get the cadavers there in one piece.

    Anyways, pay started at $25 an hour, which isn't too shabby, and you wouldn't have to put up with much lip from people, unlike a security officer gig that pays half that much....
    Not sure about cops and firefighters being more responsible drivers...but we certainly wouldn't be grossed out by a corpse.

    A buddy of mine works for an organ procurement company as a tissue recovery technician. A few years back I went on a "ride along" with him. 3 am he got a call that a registered organ donor had passed away...quick cup of coffee and off we went. The organ and tissue removal process is fascinating. I was amazed at all the stuff they remove for donations...not just organs, but bones, skin, veins, tendons...pretty much EVERYTHING. And then afterwards he has to reassemble the body to make it look "as good as new" before it is released to the family or funeral home. He told me that they used to get creative when replacing missing parts...ping pong balls for eyes, PVC pipe for bones...now everything they use needs to be biodegradable.

    Interesting job, but not a retirement gig I would choose...

    Leave a comment:


  • Retired96
    replied
    I have always enjoyed working in my yard, keeping my lawns perfect,,,always planting various flowers etc...So when I retired I started doing gardening for my neighbors...I don't just mow, blow and go like most of the non English speaking gardeners in So. Calif. I take care of their yards as if it was my own...Make a nice chunk of tax free money every month, get plenty of exercise...The only down side is the long commute from my own home....Its 150 yards to the house at the end of the street.

    Leave a comment:


  • Iowa #1603
    replied
    Originally posted by Jim1648 View Post



    Somehow I suspect that when conversation officers are asked by friends and relatives to go hunting and fishing, they probably want to do something else.

    Most of the CONSERVATION officers I know are avid hunters/fishermen................

    Originally posted by Jim1648 View Post

    Amateur radio is something I got into years ago
    73's
    KC0LGB

    Leave a comment:


  • L-1
    replied
    Originally posted by PeteBroccolo View Post

    20+ years, I began working, on contract, as a bar tender at our Church hall (can be rented by anyone, for any event, but if they have a liquor permit they MUST hire our bar tenders, whom are paid via the rental contract), plus 4 years ago took over as Bar Staff Co-Ordinator. I recently gave up the Co-Ordinator position, and have not worked many events, due to my current employment.
    That one surprised me. Most law enforcement agencies down here have conflict of interest rules that prohibit sworn personnel from holding secondary employment, paid or not, in jobs involving the serving or sales of alcoholic beverages.


    Leave a comment:


  • Jim1648
    replied
    Originally posted by Ratatatat View Post

    -If you like to shoot as a hobby, the last place you'll want to go on your day off is a gun shop/range....
    Read that last sentence again. That is true of pretty much other hobbies, too. For example, I did water patrol full time only one summer. I learned a lot. It was fun, but when family and/or friends suggested going to a lake or river o my time off, it really didn't do anything for me.

    Similarly, a bunch of years ago I decided that I wanted to work the Minnesota State Fair as a cop. It did it just that one year, but I never returned. Similarly, other cops warned me, "Once you work out there, you won't want to go there again." I do still like going, but if I continued to work it, I am sure I would have lost interest in attending off-duty.

    Somehow I suspect that when conversation officers are asked by friends and relatives to go hunting and fishing, they probably want to do something else.

    Another hobby of mine is horses. I am pretty sure if I worked with horses 40 plus hours a week, I would not want to be around horses when I am off-duty.

    ATVing is another hobby. I am sure I could find work related to ATVs, but I don't want to ruin my enjoyment of that hobby.

    Amateur radio is something I got into years ago. I have been asked to do volunteer public service events involving amateur radio. One of the things that they do some places is direct traffic. I pretty much got that out of my system when I was getting paid to do it.

    Oh, and with regard to the firearms hobby, my wife has gotten interested and mentioned just tonight, at dinner, that I ought to come shoot with her. I have tried explaining to her that I pretty much got that out of my system years ago, too. Maybe I will come around eventually, but for now, I am sort of enjoying a break from being at the range.

    Oh, my wife;s job is being a school bus driver. She pretty much doesn't want to drive anything when she doesn't have to. Given the opportunity, she would much rather I drove and then she could tell me how to do it, what turn I should have taken, etc.!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ratatatat
    replied
    RE: retail work at a Cabela's or gun shop. I'd put this at the bottom of my list....

    -The pay is lousy ($12-$14 an hour).

    -So is the employee discount.

    -Ever been to a Cabela's or Bass Pro Shop, especially during the holidays? It's nuts busy, where you stand on your feet for 8 hours straight and engage with countless customers all day. Exhausting work, both physically and mentally.

    -Ever wait on customers? They're a demanding lot with seemingly endless requests, like "can you show me three more versions of a Glock 9mm handgun" and "I'd like to add accessories to this AR. What are my options?" And you have to be nice and patient with all the stupidity, or else management will hear about it.

    -Here's my concern about gun shops. There are a few by me, and while I am not a frequent patron, I do occasionally stop in. And it seems like there's often people looking and buying that are a bit skeevy. Dudes with "III%" tattooed on their necks. Dudes who look like they're destined for future incarceration. Dudes who look like they kill cats for fun and giggles. I'm just saying it would probably go against my grain to engage with them and equip them, knowing what I know.

    -The other thing about gun shops: the ones by me with indoor ranges all have one thing in common: in the fairly recent past, they have all been used to facilitate suicides, where people have rented guns and moments later, killed themselves. Now a couple of ranges have tried to implement procedures to address the issue (like requiring parties of two people in order to rent a firearm), but the bottom line is no one can read someone else's mind and if they are intent on causing themselves harm, they will do so.

    -If you like to shoot as a hobby, the last place you'll want to go on your day off is a gun shop/range....

    Leave a comment:

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