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Retired ID And Badge

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  • Retired ID And Badge

    I retired from a county sheriff's office at the end of 2010. I was issued an identification card that shows: "Deputy Sheriff-Retired" on it. I never carried it much because I worked for another agency post-retirement and carried those credentials instead. Anyway, I am retired again and am just curious what others do. For example, do you always carry your retired ID with you? Do you carry a badge, also? Did your agency give you a badge to keep in retirement? Does it say "Retired" on the badge? Do you only carry you badge and identification if you are carrying a sidearm? And, if you do carry a retired badge, how do you carry it? Do you do the belt clip next to your pistol, if you are carrying a weapon? Flat badge in a credential case? Neck badge? We have/had the traditional, for this area, 5 point star badge. The tab on top of the state seal states DEPUTY SHERIFF and the tab below states the county name. I also have an additional tab on top that shows my first initial, last name, and badge number. That would seem to be the most logical tab to have removed and replace it with RETIRED. Or, maybe I will get a brand new badge, but I would get a flat one, with a wallet clip. Prior to retirement from that agency, I was in civilian clothing and was required to display the badge IF the Glock was visible, or carry it so it wasn't visible. I always wore soft clothing, rarely a suit, but I liked to carry it concealed. So, a neck holder for the badge worked well for me, If I was assisting another agency, the badge came out, around the neck. And, if I was wearing one, the flap on the jacket dropped down displaying DEPUTY SHERIFF. Now that I am retired, I am sort of hard pressed to think of very many times when the credentials will be displayed. Obviously, if I am carrying, and the weapon needs to come out, that would be a time. Some would suggest carrying it with your driver's license, and pistol permit, in case you are stopped on a traffic stop. The local busses and trains allow cops, etc., to ride free, so there is that. I am also well aware that many feel that if credentials are carried, you better be carrying a weapon or you put yourself at risk. I agree with that, too. I am just curious what others, who are retired, are doing in this regard? I am anticipating that the answers will run the gamut, from one extreme, to the other, and many somewhere in between. Some probably carry 100% in retirement, some probably 0%, and others when there is a perceived need. Just like off duty, in service cops, some always carry, some never carry, and others somewhere in between.

  • #2
    I retired over 7.5 years ago as a Regular Member (Police Officer - rank was Constable) of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) after 35+ years of service, all in uniform, performing duties somewhat equivalent to a USA State or Municipal Police Service officer.

    I was issued a retiree photo ID card, mainly to show that I am authorized to wear my uniform (NOT the Service Order #1 of grey shirt and duty belt, but the Red Serge tunic for Review Order (with riding breeches and brown boots - for parades or honour guards) or Walking Out Order (straight legged trousers and dress black boots - for formal dinners). I had to turn in my badge (gold shield, with silver regimental crest, stamped and enameled with my Regimental number, which are individually and permanently assigned to us) but it was returned to me encased in an acrylic paper-weight.

    Canadian criminal and firearm laws are WAY different compared to the USA. I had to surrender my duty firearm (S&W Model 10 .38 Spl from 1975 to 1995, then a S&W 5946) and was not legally able to even handle a firearm until just recently, as I was not a hunter nor a recreational shooter. I took the Canadian Firearms Safety Course (non-restricted - common hunting / recreational long barreled firearm) so I could get my Possession Acquisition Licence (PAL) in order to be able to handle such firearms at the retail store I work at now (warehouse and retail area).

    I carry both my RCMP retiree ID card and PAL in my wallet at all times. I have no authority, need, or desire, to carry a sidearm.
    #32936 - Royal Canadian Mounted Police - 1975-10-27 / 2010-12-29
    Proud Dad of #54266 - RCMP - 2007-02-12 to date
    RCMP Veterans Association - Regina Division member
    Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada - Associate (Retired) member
    "Smile" - no!

    Comment


    • PeteBroccolo
      PeteBroccolo commented
      Editing a comment
      RCMP RM (we HAD Civilian Members, such as Telecomms Operators, Air Mechanical Engineers, Automotive Technicians, Radio Techs, Computer Techs, Forensic Lab Scientists, from 1960 to recently, but they are being re-classified as Public Service personnel) can, sort-of, count backwards from their own Regimental # to the very first member appointed in 1873.

      I say, "sort-of", because in our historically cheap manner, some idiot started to re-issue our Reg # as our members got too drunk to be allowed to stay, orfled in terror at the realization of what they got themselves into, during a little camping trip we fondly entitled the 1874 March West. Rumours are we need to add 150 to 300 (?) to be close.

  • #3
    State law requires an agency to issued a retired ID card to retirees in California.

    My department requires the surrender of you badge upon retirement, however, they then send it to the manufacturer, have a :Retired" ribbon affixed to it and give it back to you as a gift.

    Most retirees I know had a flat badge manufactured prior to retirement (and my agency will still allow you to buy one after retirement). The retired ID card is carried in the case with the flat badge. I don't know of any retiree who deliberately had a flat badge made with a "retired" ribbon on it. Usually, the only time you are going to display the badge is to get the newbie who doesn't recognize you to buzz you back into the station when you have business, to establish your lawful ability to carry a weapon, or when you are assisting another officer in a dire emergency. If it's an HR 218 issue you can verbally advise them you're retired. If you are assisting in a life or death emergency, I doubt anyone will have the time or inclination look hard at your badge to see if you are retired or active or debate whether to accept help from someone who is retired.

    I have never seen a retiree wear a badge around his neck or clipped to his belt. Doing so suggests the retiree is attempting to represent to others that he is still an active officer. Your peers are going to look at you sideways if you start doing that.

    ,
    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

    Comment


    • #4
      We get the option of either our keeping our ID wallet/badge (we call them a 'freddy') with RETIRED stamped on the leather or having it mounted in a display case alongside your rank epaulettes, sleeve patch, photos and certificates. There are some conditions such as ethical service and a certain amount of time served.

      Once we retire we cease to be members of the force and lose our legal exemptions to carry weapons. Our firearms don't belong to us, they belong to the force and we're not allowed to carry them off duty even when we're still employed. Similar to what PeteBroccolo said about Canada, there's no real need to carry firearms off duty in Australia.

      Comment


      • #5
        Most retirees around here that have a "Retired " badge carry it in a credential case along with their RETIRED ID..

        If you are carrying .............you are carrying CONCEALED so you don't want the badge clipped to your belt or around your neck.

        As L-1 stated .................if you need to assist an on duty officer you are going to be verbal with them & can "prove" your status when things quiet down.

        I do agree if you are carrying a badge .................carry the weapon.
        Last edited by Iowa #1603; 07-03-2018, 07:29 AM.
        Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

        Comment


        • #6
          The NYPD has you turn in your shield. It is reused and issued to a new member. Many retirees have a duplicate made for retirement. The guns are yours to keep provided you get a license. Everyone always carries their retired I.D. Carrying the gun and shield varies based on what you're doing or where you're going on any given day.

          Comment


          • #7
            Just to clarify the discussion here; when you say, "sidearm", we ARE talking about that thing that I had on my duty belt that I used as an elbow-rest / hat-hanger, yes? I heard rumours it could do something noisy if you pulled the little thingy.
            #32936 - Royal Canadian Mounted Police - 1975-10-27 / 2010-12-29
            Proud Dad of #54266 - RCMP - 2007-02-12 to date
            RCMP Veterans Association - Regina Division member
            Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada - Associate (Retired) member
            "Smile" - no!

            Comment


            • #8
              Originally posted by PeteBroccolo View Post
              ..when you say, "sidearm", we ARE talking about that thing that I had on my duty belt that I used as an elbow-rest / hat-hanger, yes?...
              I am actually inclined to say "pistol", but then I realize there a very small minority of people around here that carried a revolver. (Young guys/gals, Google "revolver".) While I haven't seen it personally, I have heard that there are still a couple of coppers around this area carrying a revolver on duty! Perhaps handgun would have been a better choice of words for me!

              Comment


              • PeteBroccolo
                PeteBroccolo commented
                Editing a comment
                My post was more a commentary on my, thankfully, not having had to use my weapon.

            • #9
              Last time I looked, I believe revolvers are a form of pistol.

              Comment


              • #10
                When I retire, I will carry my retirement ID for LEOSA purposes and my flat wallet badge in the same set up I have carried for years. I will more than likely carry most of the time....it's such a habit after years of doing it.
                Last edited by Kraut0783; 07-03-2018, 11:11 AM.

                Comment


                • #11
                  Retired from LASD, Dept. gave me a flat wallet badge that has my rank (Sgt) and says retired...Same badge number as when I was working. Have a photo ID that authorizes concealed carry.. Had to buy Deputy and Sgt. badges that are mounted in a clear case.

                  I always carry a concealed weapon so I always have my badge and ID on my person.

                  When I retired the dept. allowed you to purchase your duty weapon (Beretta 92fs) and 3 15 round mags for 300.00..
                  Retired LASD

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Originally posted by Retired96 View Post

                    When I retired the dept. allowed you to purchase your duty weapon (Beretta 92fs) and 3 15 round mags for 300.00..
                    Virginia law, retiree can purchase his duty weapon for $1.00. Usually the Chief buys it for you.

                    We are issued retiree creds and badge. Creds are lifetime VA concealed weapons permit. LEOSA card is separate.

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      My father worked with a Police Department and before he retired he was also a sworn Sheriff's Deputy. This was because his cases took him around the state out of his main jurisdiction. He also needed the Deputy status for some school security details he worked when he was retired from the PD. Basically the Deputy creds stay at home in the safe and he carries a Retired Police Officer badge in a wallet that was issued to him. He always carries concealed and always has his wallet and retired badge. That being said, it is a George Costanza wallet. (I can't deal with fat badge wallets. I use a badge belt clip and conceal it off duty.) He also maintains his LEOSA and qualifies regularly as required to keep that up to date. Most agencies in my state issue a retired badge and ID cards and have various procedures for you to keep your service weapon.
                      Far and away the best prize life has to offer is working hard at work worth doing.”

                      Theodore Roosevelt

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        Originally posted by PeteBroccolo View Post

                        Canadian criminal and firearm laws are WAY different compared to the USA. I had to surrender my duty firearm (S&W Model 10 .38 Spl from 1975 to 1995, then a S&W 5946) and was not legally able to even handle a firearm until just recently... I have no authority, need, or desire, to carry a sidearm.
                        That's because Canada is the epitome of politeness. One never needs to shoot a Canadian.

                        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                        Comment


                        • PeteBroccolo
                          PeteBroccolo commented
                          Editing a comment
                          There ARE times, my friend, that we HAVE been known to NOT be sorry!

                      • #15
                        My former agency will issue a "Retired" photo ID card if the retiree asks for one. If the retiree wants to qualify to carry a firearm under LEOSA, the "Retired" ID will list the qualified firearms on the reverse side. My Association will have a retired replica badge made for the retiree.

                        The agency allowed me to buy the Glock 22 I carried when I left, but I had to buy it through their firearms supplier and pay their price ($350.00+fees). I say 'allowed' because back when we transitioned from revolvers to the Glocks, I wanted to buy my S&W .38 but was denied.

                        I also wanted to buy the Taser when I retired, but they wouldnt let me have it.
                        You can trust just about every officer you work with to risk their life to save yours, but don't ever leave your lunch in the breakroom refrigerator.

                        Comment

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