Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tactical Team Training

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Tactical Team Training

    For all the members of tactical teams:


    I am looking for ideas for monthly training. We currently train apx 8-12 hours monthly either 1 day or broken up in to two day sessions.

    I am in the process of mixing it up a little, trying to add some new training to the sessions and am looking for ideas of what other teams are doing.

    Any help would be appreciated.
    Sometimes when you want the devil, you have to go to hell to get him.

    In a fight, we do not rise to the level of our expectations. We fall to the level of our training.

  • #2
    Stay with parishable skills.

    We train 12 hours per month, two 6 hours sessions. 1 of the sessions is boring old building clearing and search, dynamic and stealth. the other is usually weapons, range and another skill deemed necessary by the team boss.

    If your not clearing buildings lots of folks forget how or more likely get lazy with it. we also train in rescue work with the armored vehicle. other agencies call on us for the use of our big truck, they get the truck team as well. no reason to get there and scew it up or look stupid and get someone killed.
    It takes a Wolf.......

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, that was our problem, we are doing the building searches etc...I was looking for some new ideas to keep things interesting. You are very right however in the fact that officers become lazy when performing the searches.

      How about scenarios? Does anyone train with scenarios, if so, which ones and how do you do it?
      Sometimes when you want the devil, you have to go to hell to get him.

      In a fight, we do not rise to the level of our expectations. We fall to the level of our training.

      Comment


      • #4
        throw some senarios into the blding search.

        cant be lazy with the bread and butter. tac cops die when they get lazy.
        It takes a Wolf.......

        Comment


        • #5
          do some active shooter scenarios and officer down drills. if you have access to simunition guns its about as realistic as it gets.

          Comment


          • #6
            Shoot house/tire house with live/frangible/sims will help break the routine.

            Comment


            • #7
              Do scenarios like a barricaded suspect in the woods. Our tactical team did training on tracking people in the woods, which actually, to my suprise, worked really well. We've trained in rappelling. Do hostage situations on a bus or in a car. Sometimes we would get to training and they would suprise us by having a scenario set up for us to respond to. You would be suprised how well that will prepare you for the real thing. You'll learn quick that you need to bring snacks and water to your call-outs cause you don't know how long it's gonna last. Sometimes we would get a stack of priority warrants and go serve them. It's good training and you actually get to accomplish something. We've gone out and done raids with narcotics on training days. I think we really do a good job of mixing it up. They never tell us what we'll be doing so you always have to come prepared for anything, just like on a call-out. Hope this will give you some ideas.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by MJLinPA
                do some active shooter scenarios and officer down drills. if you have access to simunition guns its about as realistic as it gets.
                You can't beat sim guns. We get vollunteers that aren't police officers to come in and play the bad guys. It always seems like they want to get into a shootout at first, then the more times they get shot, the more compliant they get.

                Also, have you noticed that some cases of the sim ammo are alot hotter than others? The last case we used would make you bleed when you got shot through BDU shirts/pants at about 25 feet. That stuff was hot! I actually liked it alot better because it seemed more realistic to me.

                Comment


                • #9
                  i have been in an n.t.o.a. swat class all week and tomorrow is sims day. i hope that we dont have any hot rounds flying around because those things hurt bad enough as is. i guess not as much as a bullet though and after all the object is not to get hit. definately a great training tool that everyone should be able to practice with.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    "You can't beat sim guns. We get vollunteers that aren't police officers to come in and play the bad guys. It always seems like they want to get into a shootout at first, then the more times they get shot, the more compliant they get."

                    This brings up a good point. Whay type of waivers do you have your volunteers sign? And, on those same lines while using volunteers, does your team ever deploy NF/DDs while a volunteer is in the area?
                    Sometimes when you want the devil, you have to go to hell to get him.

                    In a fight, we do not rise to the level of our expectations. We fall to the level of our training.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The team gets 2 days a month for training.

                      We normally do building searches but switch from dynamic to slow and deliberate. Occasionally we do bus assaults and are working on airplane assaults. We try to get range time once a month.

                      During the building searches we may just use an empty building and work on movement or we can throw "bad guys" in for us to find.

                      Since we added sims about a year ago it has made training much better.
                      A Veteran is someone who at one point in their life wrote a blank check made payable to The United States of America, for an amount up to, and including their life. That is honor, and there are way too many people in this country today, who no longer understand that fact!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Maybe it was already mentioned, but how about high risk vehicle stops / vehicle assaults. Use sim if you're allowed. HRVS are probably one of the most unpredictable and dynamic situations.
                        "Support Our Troops"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by law607
                          "You can't beat sim guns. We get vollunteers that aren't police officers to come in and play the bad guys. It always seems like they want to get into a shootout at first, then the more times they get shot, the more compliant they get."

                          This brings up a good point. Whay type of waivers do you have your volunteers sign? And, on those same lines while using volunteers, does your team ever deploy NF/DDs while a volunteer is in the area?
                          Our volunteers consist of other coppers who work in uniform and are trying to get into our unit. We use training DD's, they sound like fire crackers.
                          "Support Our Troops"

                          Comment

                          MR300x250 Tablet

                          Collapse

                          What's Going On

                          Collapse

                          There are currently 4394 users online. 270 members and 4124 guests.

                          Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                          Welcome Ad

                          Collapse
                          Working...
                          X