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Your Dept policy on Ride-Along?

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  • Your Dept policy on Ride-Along?

    In your department how many years of experience must an officer have before they are able to take out riders?

  • #2
    Originally posted by SalemBlue
    In your department how many years of experience must an officer have before they are able to take out riders?
    As soon as FTO is finished, the officer can have a ride along. However, I wouldn't recommend it until after probation. And of course the superiors can deny or accept any offer for a ride along. One of my co-workers was denied his girlfriend riding along this week. He was ****ed. The reason stated was
    It's 106 miles to Chicago, we've got a full tank of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, it's dark, and we're wearing sunglasses....Hit it!

    Comment


    • #3
      Same as Rabbit. New deputies can have a citizen.

      The policy used to be once a year for a citizen, twice a year for a spouse.

      I have to see what's in print, because I see it has been "stretched" to twice a year for citizens. What kills me is that sgts. are allowing certain people to ride along numerous times. Some are folks who are in backgrounds with us, so I see that as a good idea. I wonder what the policy says about sgts. going around the paper process.

      But some riders are overzealous young groupies who we later arrest. I have had some real losers forced upon me by a sgt., and protesting only made me look like a crybaby. I never thought I'd have to take a citizen into my car who I didn't feel safe with. They sit there with my long guns at the whim of an electronic switch. They see how we operate. After spending painful hours listening to how they are "interested' in the Job, you find out they also have the same thoughts about current law enforcement as those web sites that complain about us. One ridiculed me for not knowing words to a song. Okay kid, I'm in my late thirties and have a full time job. What happened to citizen riders sitting there with respect?

      Whoa! Sorry for taking your simple question and ranting...

      Comment


      • #4
        put it this way,jus dont do it . i never have and never will.the wife know's enough. no need to ride unless she want's . most of the time she rejects.now far as a non-leo they can ride in behind the line"My back seat" jus like everyone else now that's a ride along hee hee
        "DROP IT" .........lights out! crook cooked!

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        • #5
          Hoo boy do I have some good ride-along stories. First of all, to answer your question...In my agency, you typically wait until you're off probation before you ask to let your significant other ride along. But the kicker is that we get a lot of civilian ride-alongs...high school interns, media, civic leaders, police wannabes, etc. and the rookies tend to get the bulk of those. Nobody wants those so the senior officers typically dodge them. I had my first ride along within 2 weeks of going solo.

          My 2 favorite ride-along stories:

          Back in my first year, I was assigned a ride-along that looked to be about 13 years old. Our policy is supposed to be 18 years old, but this kid obviously knew somebody or saw a Capt. doing something he shouldn't have been doing. This kid was dead scared from the beginning and I could see it in his eyes. About an hour into the shift, I had to run code to a local deputy calling for immediate help at a nearby skating rink. I hit the railroad tracks hard enough to almost go airborne, and my car came down so hard that sparks went everywhere and my blue lights stopped spinning. I finished my wild ride to the deputy and fortunately he was fine. When I got back into the car, I could see that the kid was almost green. I told him I was headed back to the PD to drop off paperwork and asked if he wanted to go home. All he said was, "Yes, sir". That was the quickest I've ever gotten rid of one!

          Not long after that, we had a particularly troublesome high school intern that rode with us for about 2 hours a shift during day shifts. He only rode with me one time and the first thing I noticed was that he carried a bible with him. After getting back in my car after the first call, I noticed he had changed the radio to a local gospel station. I changed it back to my rock and gave him a quick speech about touching other people's stuff (coveting thy neighbor's radio) and thought it was over. A few minutes later he started talking junk about one of my fellow officers saying that he was going to burn in hell for cursing. I drove immediately to the PD and told him to get out and sit in the lobby while I told my Capt. about the experience. Needless to say he didn't ride anymore that day and I'm pretty sure he was removed from the program.

          Any other horror stories?

          By the way, I've also had some GOOD ride-alongs, one of which has now become my fiance.

          Gibbmusic
          Okay, just how big were those two beers sir?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Gibbmusic
            Back in my first year, I was assigned a ride-along that looked to be about 13 years old. Our policy is supposed to be 18 years old, but this kid obviously knew somebody or saw a Capt. doing something he shouldn't have been doing. This kid was dead scared from the beginning and I could see it in his eyes. About an hour into the shift, I had to run code to a local deputy calling for immediate help at a nearby skating rink. I hit the railroad tracks hard enough to almost go airborne, and my car came down so hard that sparks went everywhere and my blue lights stopped spinning. I finished my wild ride to the deputy and fortunately he was fine. When I got back into the car, I could see that the kid was almost green. I told him I was headed back to the PD to drop off paperwork and asked if he wanted to go home. All he said was, "Yes, sir". That was the quickest I've ever gotten rid of one!
            That is one of the best ride along stories I've ever heard. It's especially funny to me because I went on my first ride along when I was 14 and it was extremely busy. My first ride along happened to fall on cinco de mayo (Which was also a Saturday that year) and we have a very large Mexican population where I live. Now don't ask me why any agency would let a 14 year old ride along but I was able to do it no problem. So, since we heard the perspective of the cop, lets hear the perspective from the 14 year old kid
            It's 106 miles to Chicago, we've got a full tank of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, it's dark, and we're wearing sunglasses....Hit it!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by RabbitMPD
              Why oh why would a department let a 14 year old go on a ride?
              I guess when you think about it...some explorers could be that young. Still seems very young though, especially on a night they KNOW will be busy.

              Comment


              • #8
                Have to be off probation. We have 6 month academy, then 12 monthes of probation (which includes 4-6 month FTO program).

                Rider has to be 18 yoa, and our policy prohibits officers with civilian ride alongs from being directly involved in vehicle pursuit.
                "A fanatic is one who won't change his mind, and won't change the subject." -Winston Churchill

                "I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts." -Will Rogers

                "To desire to save these wolves in society may arise from benevolence, but it must be the benevolence of a child or a fool" -Henry Fielding

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                • #9
                  Our agency requires that the person requesting the ride-a-long is either a L.E.O./military police AND that the officer driving is past his/her probation period. Some exceptions are made for the person riding NOT being a L.E.O., such as a city council member, reporter, etc., but 99% of the time it's a L.E.O. from another state/country.
                  If it wasn't for STUPID PEOPLE I'd be unemployed.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Our dept policy is the officer has to be 6 months past his/her hire date and the rider be 16+.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      In Oregon for OSP, you have to be a Trooper for 2 years before you can have riders. The first 18 months (probation) your a recruit so after 3 years 6 months you can take riders.
                      The road to success is not straight
                      There is a curve called Failure, a Loop called Confusion, speed bumps
                      called Friends, red lights called Enemies, caution lights called
                      Family. You will have flats called Jobs. But, if you have a spare called
                      Determination, an engine called Perseverance, insurance called Faith, a
                      driver called Jesus, you will make it to a Place called Success! May
                      God continue to bless you

                      www.osptrooper.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Dept Policy on Ride Along

                        Alabama DPS requires Trooper to have completed FTO Program before being allowed to have ride alongs. The Department really doesn't push ride alongs. Sworn Officers from other agencies are allowed to ride with Troopers, and often do, as do Trooper Reserves.Citizen ride alongs are pretty much on a case by case basis. As a supervisor, I never required an Officer to take a ride along with him.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A 6 pack of mountain dew and pop tarts gets a ride along here.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Out here in L.A., officers aren't allowed to have ride alongs. Only a supervisor can take out a ride along. Plus, the ride along has to sign a waiver in case anything happens. That is because the ride along goes everywhere the supervisor goes.

                            Whenever I have a ride along, I always try to make sure they see everything, just as we do (excluding maybe inside a homicide scene). I've been in a few pursuits with ride alongs. Boy did they almost crap their pants!

                            If any of you ever come out to L.A. for vacation, let me know and I'll bring you out with me!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Riders

                              No time limits for officers to have riders. No riders with reserve officers.
                              All riders have to sign a noterized waiver and SOPs state that riders must be"put out" in case of a pursuit.
                              "Laws that forbid the carrying of arms. . . disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes. . . Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man." - Thomas Jefferson

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