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  • #31
    Saving on PC

    I just got a new Olympus VN960PC. Perhaps someone can help me here. What is the best way to transfer the files to my PC and have them arranged via date and time incase I need to recall them at a later time? This one seems to be very different than my last.
    In law enforcement, the customer is ALWAYS wrong.

    In God we trust. Everyone else is run through NCIC.

    Sometimes there is justice. Sometimes there is just us.

    I'd rather be tried by 12 then carried by 6.


    The opinions given in my posts do not necessarily reflect the opinions, views, policies, and/or procedures of my employing agency. They are my personal opinions only.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by sflcop
      I just got a new Olympus VN960PC. Perhaps someone can help me here. What is the best way to transfer the files to my PC and have them arranged via date and time incase I need to recall them at a later time? This one seems to be very different than my last.
      I looked up the specs for your recorder on the web, and it indicates that it comes with a USB cable. When you plug the USB cable into the recorder (power on) and into the USB port on the PC, you should see a new drive listed under "My Computer." Double click on that drive icon and you should see a listing of your sound files. Copy or move those into a folder on your hard drive and they should then be available on your PC. I suggest creating a subfolder for each day of recordings, and maybe even a subfolder for each incident of any consequence. I don't know if the recorder date/time stamps each recording or not, so it might be useful to rename the files as you go if it doesn't.

      I'd also suggest periodically archiving the recordings to a CD - maybe once a month. Buy a CD album or other file and keep them in a safe place. Even if you never use them for evidence or a**-covering purposes, they'll be useful as training tools later on, or as memory-joggers if you ever decide to write a book. I think every cop thinks about writing a book at one time or another.
      Tim Dees, now writing as a plain old forum member, his superpowers lost to an encounter with gold kryptonite.

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      • #33
        Tim and DUI, thanks for your advice. I'm going to play with it now and give it a try to see if the date and time carry over.
        In law enforcement, the customer is ALWAYS wrong.

        In God we trust. Everyone else is run through NCIC.

        Sometimes there is justice. Sometimes there is just us.

        I'd rather be tried by 12 then carried by 6.


        The opinions given in my posts do not necessarily reflect the opinions, views, policies, and/or procedures of my employing agency. They are my personal opinions only.

        Comment


        • #34
          I always tell my supervisors about calls I may get complaints on.

          Supervisors believe me without question because I have told them some of the complaints I MAY get.

          I have definitely surprised supervision and myself with things I have said to the public. Thats why they believe me when I tell them about possible complaints.

          Just tell both sides of the story and be honest.

          The public just gives their side of the story and that is why they have zero credibility with supervison most of the time.

          Supervisors love to know your side of the story when the compaint comes in. That way they are prepared and there are no surprises.
          Last edited by USAcop; 08-29-2005, 07:29 PM.

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          • #35
            I am seriously thinking about picking one up. However, I am not sure of the legal guidelines for recording. I am a rookie and my dept has the voice recorders but half of them dont work. Do you have to state that you are recording or it doesn't matter. I work in FL, I have not been able to find anything in the statute book about this. Can anyone help me out? Thanks
            Last edited by Mac25; 08-30-2005, 01:33 PM.

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            • #36
              we were issued iriver mp3 players because of complaints, but have found many uses for them including under cover drug operations. they work very well and are very clear i recommend.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Mac25
                I am seriously thinking about picking one up. However, I am not sure of the legal guidelines for recording. I am a rookie and my dept has the voice recorders but half of them dont work. Do you have to state that you are recording or it doesn't matter. I work in FL, I have not been able to find anything in the statute book about this. Can anyone help me out? Thanks
                In FL people have no expectation of privacy when dealing with the police. You can record until your heart is content.
                In law enforcement, the customer is ALWAYS wrong.

                In God we trust. Everyone else is run through NCIC.

                Sometimes there is justice. Sometimes there is just us.

                I'd rather be tried by 12 then carried by 6.


                The opinions given in my posts do not necessarily reflect the opinions, views, policies, and/or procedures of my employing agency. They are my personal opinions only.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by bluep7
                  What does the case law say on this. Has it ever been deemed unconstitutional that anyone knows of.
                  You have to research your state's laws to determine this. Most, if not all states forbid anyone to record a conversation to which they are not a party. To do so is bugging or wiretapping. Some states allow you to surreptitiously record a conversation if you are a party to it. These are called "one party consent states." For instance, in those states you can attach a recorder to your telephone and record any conversation in which you are participating (but not one of a third party - such as a friend or relative that was using your phone). Then there are "two party consent states" where you can't make a recording of a phone conversation unless you get express consent from all parties being recorded. Finally, some states differentiate between electronically transmitted communications and in-person, face to face communications, so you might not be able to record a phone call, but you could an in-person conversation. And, to muddy the waters further, there are often exceptions for law enforcement.

                  So, I advise you to check with your local prosecutor's office and get the straight scoop for your jurisdiction.
                  Tim Dees, now writing as a plain old forum member, his superpowers lost to an encounter with gold kryptonite.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    I bought a $60.00 (Aust) MP3 player 128Mg with digital recording mode. Its the size of a disposable cigarette lighter and records 14 hours non stop.

                    Plugs straight into your USB drive. With an editing program you can quickly cut out all the driving around when nothing is happening and just keep a record of your apprehensions, then copy them to disc if you dont wont to leave them on your hard drive.

                    As I work one up most shifts, its a great, cheap tool.

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                    • #40
                      Digital recorders make and break careers...all depends who is holding and editing them...Cops keep the whole conversations and walk....bad guys edit and pick the parts that make them look like angels....buy one...and kiss it everyday....

                      Comment

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