Ad JS

Collapse

Leaderboard

Collapse

Leaderboard Tablet

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

10 Codes

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 10 Codes

    I always see 10-8 10-7 and all that.

    My PD, and most PD's in the northern Denver metro area, use "free speech" on the radio instead of 10 codes. When they dispacth us to a burg for example, the radio traffic is like this:

    Dispatcher: 2c71 copy a cold burglary
    Officer: 2c71 go ahead
    D: Cold burglary 6767 Monaco St. RP on scene found door open. Residence has been cleared.
    O: Copy, enroute

    There are only like 8 or 9 codes we use. Traffic stops, warrants, custody, good to go and for lunch

    2c71, code 6 means you're making a traffic stop...For example...

    Is this weird? Are we the exception to the rule or are there other agencies out there who use free speech? It seems like getting a 215 code 3 with a 433 on the 239 would get confusing...
    And lo, as I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
    I shall ask myself,
    "This is the f*cking Valley of the Shadow of Death! What the f*ck am I doing in the f*cking Valley of the Shadow of Death?!?!"

  • #2
    Re: 10 Codes

    Originally posted by SaNdMaN
    I always see 10-8 10-7 and all that.

    My PD, and most PD's in the northern Denver metro area, use "free speech" on the radio instead of 10 codes. When they dispacth us to a burg for example, the radio traffic is like this:

    Dispatcher: 2c71 copy a cold burglary
    Officer: 2c71 go ahead
    D: Cold burglary 6767 Monaco St. RP on scene found door open. Residence has been cleared.
    O: Copy, enroute
    its not.

    same call; my language.

    disptacher: 534I ("I" on the end meaning two man, second shift.)
    Us: What woman!, key the mic, "go ahead".
    dispatcher, a 459 6767 monaco st rp said that she arrived home and found the door open.
    Us: say nothing. its implied were 10-17 (enroute)

    we also say code 6. we have a ton of ten codes and code, well codes... as in 10-4 or (code) 998

    bottom line is who cares. Just b safe.
    Peace by power

    Comment


    • #3
      We pretty much did away with codes 25 years ago. Prior to that, all calls were dispatched with a code. 12-27 was a family beef, 12-23 was a burglary etc. The only ones still used are 12-34 means mental case and 55A is homicide, 55D is natural and so forth. Everything else is clear voice. They still use a code for an arrest warrant on the subject, but that part of my brain hasn't woke up yet and I don't remember what it is.
      "Life's tough, it's tougher if you're stupid." John Wayne

      Comment


      • #4
        Columbus Police Use 10 Codes
        Ohio Highway Patrol have their own version
        Ohio Sheriff's have a Code / Signal Combination

        Many small pd's use Sheriff's system since they are dispatched and backed up by Sheriff.

        I used to know all of them. I learned them all as a dispatcher in the 70's before hitting the streets.

        Comment


        • #5
          There are a lot of departments that are going to plain language dispatch. Where I work we use codes for firearm involvement, active robbery/burglary, suicidal subject, and other situations that you may not want the leisure scanner bug to pick up on. The die-hards and news people know the lingo from listening intently. I prefer plain language especially in critical incidents when your brain is otherwise engaged. I do however sometimes find myself talking with brothers in 10 and signal codes. The key is knowing what you are being told and what you are telling others...regardless of the manner it is communicated. Also know that there are variations of 10 codes, Signal codes, and assorted Codes in use by PDs across the country.
          " (T)o preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them.... " Richard Henry Lee, 1788

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by badger
            The die-hards and news people know the lingo from listening intently. I prefer plain language especially in critical incidents when your brain is otherwise engaged.
            Yeah, it's not like they are some kind of super secret. As a new cop, they handed out cards with the codes on them. I suspect any citizen that wanted one could ask for it. I think the original idea was to cut down on air time perhaps?
            "Life's tough, it's tougher if you're stupid." John Wayne

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by retdetsgt
              I think the original idea was to cut down on air time perhaps?
              I'm pretty sure that was the reason for the codes...the old-school radios needed time to warm up prior to transmitting, etc.

              I feel that the codes (with a few exceptions) should be laid to rest...plain talk is the way to go.

              Comment


              • #8
                We've got a few 10 codes still in use, along with "Code 1" etc to let us know that a subject we've got stopped is wanted. It's better to hear a dispatcher say "Your subject is Code 2", meaning a misdemeanor warrant, rather than have them say it openly and have my guy panic and take off running.

                The codes don't bother me that much. What bugs the crap out of me is when dispatch starts every transmission with "Be advised...". It just seems like a pretty redundant thing to say when you use 10 codes to minimize air time usage.

                Comment


                • #9
                  What used to send me through the roof was when the dispatcher said "You'll have to advise on cover (our word for backup). No one is available." If no one is available, who the hell will I be advising! I gotta couple of letters in my file for responding not too diplomatically to that one.

                  Another time, a dispatcher sent me on a robbery at a motel. I asked if it was in progress and she said she didn't know. I'd have to find out when I got there. I took the call, but afterwards, I went 10-7 to radio. I walked up to her console, pulled the plug on her headset and explained to her to never f@@@@@g send me or anyone else to a robbery on that kind of information!

                  Normally, I got along okay with dispatchers, but everynow and then I'd have some bonehead who thought this was some kind of video game or something....

                  The only real code left is Code Zero. That means an officer is either down or about to get his butt kicked badly.
                  "Life's tough, it's tougher if you're stupid." John Wayne

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    heres a website with different 10 codes /signals etc.... just choose your whatever state you want in the box

                    http://www.bearcat1.com/radio.htm

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: 10 Codes

                      Originally posted by SaNdMaN


                      Is this weird? Are we the exception to the rule or are there other agencies out there who use free speech? It seems like getting a 215 code 3 with a 433 on the 239 would get confusing...
                      Years ago I was hiding on top of a parking structure writing reports and I started hearing cars and the dispatcher using these weird codes. I listened for a while and somebody said something that made me realize I was picking up Denver PD in Oregon! I musta gotten into some time warp thing or the atmospheric conditions got just right. It lasted for about 2 or 3 minutes and then faded.
                      "Life's tough, it's tougher if you're stupid." John Wayne

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My department uses ten-codes but most of us just use plain english. I do like the idea of using clearance codes to clear a call rather than go through this long summary over the radio of what happened. Some guys just love the sound of their own voice over the net.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          On my department we use 10 codes and plain language.

                          The problem is some of the dispatchers

                          for example:

                          O: Trinidad SD7 10-75 (traffic stop)
                          D: SD7 10-75

                          O: I'll be out with CO LP# 123ABC at Hwy 350 mm 354
                          D: Copy out with CO LP# 123ABC Hwy 350 mm 354

                          O: Trinidad SD-7 need a clearence on 2 parties.
                          D: Copy SD-7, You need a 10-27, 10-29 on 2 parties. Go ahead

                          You guys can see where this is going right.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Gooch
                            My department uses ten-codes but most of us just use plain english. I do like the idea of using clearance codes to clear a call rather than go through this long summary over the radio of what happened. Some guys just love the sound of their own voice over the net.
                            No kidding.... I once suggested at a roll call that certain officers be issued two mikes, one to use and one to play with..

                            Yeah, we clear with a code. R-1 is a report will be written, R-2 followup report, W-6 peace restored, W-1 is handled, no report written etc. Says a lot of air time and no one really cares how what you did at the call except maybe the dispatcher.
                            "Life's tough, it's tougher if you're stupid." John Wayne

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              We have a fairly elaborate 10 code system, but the ones most used are:
                              10-1: can't copy;
                              10-4;
                              10-6: busy, will call you back;
                              10-7: out of contact, with details of location and/or how to contact;
                              10-8: back on duty;
                              10-17: en route to (whatever);
                              10-27: check with the driver's licence authority on DL status;
                              10-28: as above, but for licence plate status;
                              10-29: CPIC (and NCIC/State CIC) checks for Persons (Warrants, Probation, release conditions, and criminal record (CR)) and/or Vehicles (Stolen, associated to Wanted subjects, as well as previous checks on same within the last 120 hours and registration info);
                              10-30: use caution, due to CR re V (violence), E (escape), F (firearms);
                              10-33: I NEED HELP **NOW**;
                              10-35: off duty, as well as on-call and next-on-duty info;
                              10-62: unauthorized listeners present, watch what you say;
                              10-68: either require a breath analysis tech, or will be busy being one;
                              10-75: available on cell;
                              10-76: available on portable;
                              10-77: at home;
                              10-98: stopping for a meal;
                              10-99: stopping for a break.

                              Plus a whole string of CR codes for types of previous convictions.

                              A lot of it will be brief plain-talk as far as details.

                              I prefer doing most of my status-keeping and detail-providing via my mobile work station
                              #32936 - Royal Canadian Mounted Police - 1975-10-27 / 2010-12-29
                              Proud Dad of #54266 - RCMP - 2007-02-12 to date
                              RCMP Veterans Association - Regina Division member
                              Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada - Associate (Retired) member
                              "Smile" - no!

                              Comment

                              What's Going On

                              Collapse

                              There are currently 6347 users online. 261 members and 6086 guests.

                              Most users ever online was 19,482 at 11:44 AM on 09-29-2011.

                              Welcome Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X