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A good reminder for vigilance due to latest terroristc attacks

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  • A good reminder for vigilance due to latest terroristc attacks

    Some of you older folks like me remember how freaking hyper vigilant we were in the days and weeks following the 911 attacks. Some of the newer fellow LEOs may have been little kids then- but this reminder is a good read for all of us, because based on the Canadian attacks this week, and the attack yesterday on the NYPD officers by the ***hole with the hatchet, we may be in for similar incidents to ramp up.



    All of us recognize that our jobs can be dangerous and we are no stranger to violence against law enforcement. However, over the past few weeks there has seemingly been an increase in attacks against law enforcement and other government officials. Among others, the recent terrorist attacks in Canada and the NYPD officers who were attacked yesterday - by a man with a hatchet - highlight the need for increased vigilance.

    These recent events worldwide serve as a reminder that we should increase our individual awareness pertaining to our and our families’ personal security, as well as encourage other law enforcement and public safety officials to do the same.

    For most of us, the biggest obstacle to our personal safety is an attitude of complacency. "It won’t happen to me" is dangerous thinking. Recent events throughout the world have changed—and not necessarily diminished--the threats you face.

    An attack against you or your family can take place at any time. However, you can influence what happens to you by assuming more responsibility for your own security. We know that the majority of violence, whether the intent is criminal or terroristic, starts with target selection and some degree of surveillance. While we might not always be aware of an offender’s selection of target, we can often detect surveillance – especially if that target is us – as long as we are aware of our surroundings.



    The purpose of surveillance is to identify the vulnerabilities of a potential target based on the security precautions that an individual takes. Detecting surveillance requires a fairly constant state of alertness and, therefore, must become a habit. A good sense of the baseline activity - what is normal and what is not in your surroundings – could be more important than any type of physical security precaution that you may take.



    People who have well-established routines make themselves much easier targets. Naturally, the surveillance of a person who has set habits and who takes few precautions is relativity simple in comparison to someone that exercises good situational awareness and takes individual protective measures for themselves and their families. For example, if you go to lunch at the same time and same place every day or if you travel the same route to work or home at the same time every day, then there is no need for an offender to follow you; instead it is much easier for them to set up ahead of you and just wait.



    Therefore you should:

    · - Vary your routes and times of travel.

    · - Be familiar with your route and have alternate routes.

    · - Check regularly for surveillance and suspicious vehicles, people, or activity along your route.

    When it is not possible to watch unobserved, offenders must come up with a reasonable explanation for being in the area. So it is a good practice to check the street in front of your home or office from a window before you go out each day and watch for anything unusual. Be alert to people disguised as public utility crews, road workers, vendors, etc., who might position themselves near your home or office.

    If you suspect that you are being watched, notify the local law enforcement for assistance. Note the identifying features of the vehicle or person(s), such as license plate numbers, color and make of the vehicle, physical descriptions of the person(s), etc. Don't wait to verify surveillance before you report it.

    Always check your vehicle inside and out before entering it. If you notice anything unusual, do not enter the vehicle.

    Limit what you share on social media; this includes photographs and information about who you are, where you are going, and/or how long you will be there, etc.

    Family members should also look for suspicious activities around the home, as well as be alert for people attempting to gain access to your residence by fraudulent means and suspicious telephone calls or other inquiries requesting personal information. Tell your family members to note descriptions and license numbers of suspicious vehicles and people. Advise them to be alert for the details.

    We also need to be aware of the physical indicators of possible violence. Sometimes it is not what a person says or does, but it is their "non-verbal" body language, that might indicate their intent. These signs may include:



    -Scanning the area. (Is the individual approaching you looking directly at you, or is he looking around to see if others are watching him?)

    -Flushed or pale face.

    -Sweating.

    -Pacing, restless, or repetitive movements.

    -Trembling or shaking.

    -Clenched jaws or fists.

    -Exaggerated or violent gestures.

    -Shallow, rapid breathing.

    -Scowling, sneering, or use of abusive language.

    -Glaring (1000 yard stare) or avoiding eye contact.

    -Violating your personal space (they get too close).



    Remember, the key to situational awareness is to stop, look, assess, and then act off that information. Stay safe.

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  • #2
    Originally posted by swat_op506 View Post
    [I]

    -Scanning the area. (Is the individual approaching you looking directly at you, or is he looking around to see if others are watching him?)

    -Flushed or pale face.

    -Sweating.

    -Pacing, restless, or repetitive movements.

    -Trembling or shaking.

    -Clenched jaws or fists.

    -Exaggerated or violent gestures.

    -Shallow, rapid breathing.

    -Scowling, sneering, or use of abusive language.

    -Glaring (1000 yard stare) or avoiding eye contact.

    -Violating your personal space (they get too close).



    Remember, the key to situational awareness is to stop, look, assess, and then act off that information. Stay safe.

    [/B][/B]
    All of those signs were present in my last Commander. How did I miss it?
    Retired

    Comment


    • #3
      You're killing me, Retired.
      I have had one or two like that as well, but additionally they had bad breath and/or B.O..
      SUPPORT COP RUN BUSINESSES!!
      SUPPORT LEO BUSINESSES!



      In 2017, the sales of my LEO related decals allowed me to donate over $350. to LE/ Military related charities... THANK YOU!!! Check them out HERE...

      Comment


      • #4
        In nearly six years in the job I have never needed to look over my shoulder all the time. The idea of tooling up off duty has never occurred to me.

        Recent events have completely changed my perspective. I don't like feeling like I'm jumping at shadows.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by swat_op506 View Post
          You're killing me, Retired.
          I have had one or two like that as well, but additionally they had bad breath and/or B.O..
          Even worse than the bad breath and B.O., the Commander was a female.
          Retired

          Comment

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