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Any CIT Officers here ???

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  • Any CIT Officers here ???

    Just curious if there were any CIT officers here. Over the winter I had gone through the training and got "pinned". Just curious if there are any other Officers out there that are and if you have any good stories to share ... thanks and be safe

  • #2
    I'm one. But CIT officer or not, we all deal with the same whackos, so I don't really have any good stories that you haven't already heard. The sky is the limit when it comes to hallucinations and delusions.

    The way it works here is whatever officers are available/closest will respond to the call, assess the situation, and then call for a CIT officer if they think one is needed. As the CIT, my job is primarily to decide whether or not to take this person to a psychiatric facility for an Emergency Detention (formerly called a police officer emergency commitment).

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    • #3
      Yup, and it's the best LE training I've received in my career.

      War story: The very next shift after graduating CIT I was sent to a family disturbance involving four schizophrenic people off their meds. Cover was over 30 minutes away (yes, I work in a city, but we are undermanned). "Great," I told myself, "I'm going to be the guy who shoots a family of four." But before my cover officer arrived, I had the situation completely resolved without any use of force.

      Although my use of force was in the normal range for my geographic area and shift, it went down by 75% after graduating CIT. The numbers don't lie.
      MAC

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      • #4
        I went to CIT in 2009 (Urbana) and have utilized it dozens of times, sometimes even with sane people. IMHO, this the next best thing to Hostage Negotiator training. Eating lunch with EDPs was a learning experience. We had some really good role-players; they really made us put on our critical thinking caps.

        “Truth is not what you want it to be; it is what it is, and you must bend to its power or live a lie.”

        Miyamoto Musashi

        “Life Is Hard, But It's Harder When You're Stupid”

        George V. Higgins (from The Friends of Eddie Coyle)

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        • #5
          Question to the guys outside of TX: Do you guys do any sort of "Emergency Commitments"? Or maybe they have a different name in your state.

          That's one of the main jobs for the CITs at my dept. By law, any peace officer in Texas can do an Emergency Detention. But at my dept and many others a CIT officer is required.

          As far as war stories, we have this one guy that's my nemesis. I've only been able to talk him down one time. The other 2 times it's gone to a fight. I think the problem is he's severely EDP and self-medicates with meth. He's not a huge guy, but he lifts weights a lot and he will come at you like a spidermonkey. Also most of the time he is naked by the time we get called. I honestly think we'd have better results calling animal control rather than a CIT.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by allen_gamble View Post
            Question to the guys outside of TX: Do you guys do any sort of "Emergency Commitments"? Or maybe they have a different name in your state.
            We are authorized, but generally have the on-call mental health counselor (Public Health Dept.) do this. I have done three (of about fifty) myself.

            “Truth is not what you want it to be; it is what it is, and you must bend to its power or live a lie.”

            Miyamoto Musashi

            “Life Is Hard, But It's Harder When You're Stupid”

            George V. Higgins (from The Friends of Eddie Coyle)

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            • #7
              What does CIT stand for?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BNWS View Post
                What does CIT stand for?
                Crisis Intervention Team

                “Truth is not what you want it to be; it is what it is, and you must bend to its power or live a lie.”

                Miyamoto Musashi

                “Life Is Hard, But It's Harder When You're Stupid”

                George V. Higgins (from The Friends of Eddie Coyle)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by allen_gamble View Post
                  Question to the guys outside of TX: Do you guys do any sort of "Emergency Commitments"? Or maybe they have a different name in your state.

                  That's one of the main jobs for the CITs at my dept. By law, any peace officer in Texas can do an Emergency Detention. But at my dept and many others a CIT officer is required.
                  It's fairly common here in NC (in my AO, at least). If I feel like a person presents an immediate threat to their own or other's safety(ie; a suicide threat in my presence, someone doing something inherently dangerous due to halucinations, etc) and a family member/spouse isn't available to do an involuntary commitment, I can swear it out from a magistrate myself.

                  However, a family member/spouse is able to get them for a more broad scope of reasons. (substance abuse, pattern of behavior, etc.)

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                  • #10
                    Lots of emotionally disturbed people in NYC. Every cop gets training in the academy on how to handle them. When I was on patrol I got calls for these every day as my sector covered a mental health out patint clinic, a homeless drop in shelter and 5 or 6 subway stops where the mentally ill tend to congregate. When a call comes over for an edp the assigned sector responds, the Sgt is required to respond and an ESU team starts rolling to the job. ESU has a bunch of non lethal devices on there truck. It was a very common job for us. YThose calls sucked because you ended up sitting in the Psych ward for the rest of the shift waiting for the doc to evaluate them.

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                    • #11
                      I'm an instructor for the course In My county.
                      Being a good street cop is like coming to work in a wet suit and peeing in your pants. It's a nice warm feeling, but you're the only one who knows anything has happened.

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                      • #12
                        Im a retired WV deputy. Here involuntary commitments are handled by the sheriff's department.

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                        • #13
                          I am and was one of only three at my first department, but now that I'm in a metro area, there are a ton more. The county PD even has a unit that is staffed full time with CIT officer and a psych nurse (with MD's sometimes volunteering to ride). They are a county wide car and respond to any PCT, plus do follow ups.
                          Originally posted by Ceridwen
                          Just one would be stingy of me, I'd have to get two. For the children.

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                          • #14
                            We all went through a week of CIT training during the academy, and then I went through an additional class after being on the street for 2 years to get the CIT certification.

                            A few weeks before the class, I went to a call where the guy insisted that people were sneaking into his attic, moving his security cameras, etc. It was all part of some conspiracy involving his ex wife. The guy was getting pretty desperate, and I got a bad feeling about it. However, he didn't say anything that led me to believe he posed an immediate danger. It was just a gut feeling.

                            I wrote a pretty lengthy report and forwarded it to our CIT unit, and my supervisor even called the unit's office and left a message with the case number.

                            3 days later the guy walked up to a stranger in the parking garage of a hospital and shot him to death pointblank in the chest. He suspected the victim of being part of the conspiracy. I guess that's how it goes. Sometimes they slip through the cracks.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by allen_gamble View Post
                              Question to the guys outside of TX: Do you guys do any sort of "Emergency Commitments"? Or maybe they have a different name in your state.

                              That's one of the main jobs for the CITs at my dept. By law, any peace officer in Texas can do an Emergency Detention. But at my dept and many others a CIT officer is required.
                              .
                              I think for the last 7 years or so, every memeber of every recruit class at my Dept. has been CIT trained, so pretty much everyone on the dept. is a CIT officer. In my state, the "emergency commitment" Is called Involuntary hospitalization. Anything an ofc. feels someone is a danger to themselves or others if they are left on theiir own we can involuntary that person and take them to the psych ward at the hospital for evaluation.
                              "Its not what you know, its what you can prove."-Training Day

                              "Game on, bitches. Whoop whoop, flash the lights, pull it over."

                              Comment

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