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Looking for advice from Sergeants

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  • #16
    Uniform inspections is an interesting topic.

    I live in one city and work in another city. My wife's bicycle was stolen so the officer who came to take the report does not work with me. Anyways, his one pant leg is longer the other and then I realize he had hem his pants with a stapler.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Che View Post
      Obviously your POV is from an officer.

      Unless you are on a real small department, sergeants do not make staffing calls. That is the LT role and anything to do with payroll.
      We are small - only 165 sworn but actually running about 140. Our patrol shifts only run eight to 10, so the sergeant is the watch commander. Minimim staffing is set per policy, but it's the sergeant's job to make sure enough people go out on his/her shift. It's that way at a great deal of departments.
      Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

      I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

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      • #18
        I am a two time Sergeant and can add the following to the already valuable input-

        • Take a long pause before you charge in with your new stripes ablaze. You earned the rank; now earn the trust and confidence of your officers. It takes time.

        • Remember that everyone knows what you did and did not do as a slick sleeve. While you are now the ranking officer – the past is NOT that long ago. Expect to get pushback on things you enforce when you yourself were not doing it a few weeks ago.

        • Depending on the department you may well be the bearer of bad news. Get accustomed to it and own it. Don’t be the guy who delivers the stink while maligning the boss in front of the “guys”.

        • Be attuned and responsive. Work on what’s important to the guys; what they want/need may well be different than you wanted/needed as a line officer.

        • Be fair, firm and consistent. You may lose friends and gain others.

        • Some off duty adjustment may be coming- depending on the dynamics and span of things you may need to buffer yourself a bit.

        • Don’t try to reinvent the wheel. Start with what works and what meets the true needs of the troops. Once you have that down pat you can start to be innovative and creative; but use your guys to build on this and ensure you give them the credit they deserve.

        • Depending on manpower it may be better to stay back from calls and let them do their thing. Nothing derails some calls faster than rank showing up on scene- to which folks gravitate to.

        • Pick up the slack and do the dirty work without saying a word about it.

        • The honeymoon phase will end at some point.

        • If you have responsibility for timekeeping, evaluations, boards, selections, discipline, etc- get smart fast. Talk to HR and the brass about the agencies policies and vision.

        I entered into the responsibility knowing that I learned more from bad bosses than from the good. I strove to be the boss I always wanted. Sometimes that was what my team wanted- sometimes not. Some of my greatest mistakes are the genesis for the above notes. Some or none may apply to you.

        Simply put- there is not book, course or manual that can make you a “good” Sergeant (or leader for that matter), only honest openness, time and dedication will make this journey a successful lone.
        Originally posted by SSD
        It has long been the tradition on this forum and as well as professionally not to second guess or Monday morning QB the officer's who were actually on-scene and had to make the decision. That being said, I don't think that your discussion will go very far on this board.
        Originally posted by Iowa #1603
        And now you are arguing about not arguing..................

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        • #19
          My Agency does NOT conduct roll call(s). Troopers go into service directly from their driveway. Dispatch is tasked with insuring that Troopers have all pertinent information regarding BOLO's etc.

          The PCO (Dispatcher) also gives the Trooper his/her assigned area. In many instances this can consist of more than one county. This being the case, it's imperative that Supervisors trust the Officers under their supervision.

          Troopers are expected to work long hours absent direct supervision, (nights) although an "on -call" supervisor is available to assist them. Staffing at adequate levels is the responsibility of the line Supervisor, Corporal or Sergeant.

          Trust, upward and downward are at the basis of operations. Past that, I commend our OP (congratulations by the way) to the excellent advice offered by our colleagues. It doesn't get any better.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by ateamer View Post
            We are small - only 165 sworn but actually running about 140. Our patrol shifts only run eight to 10, so the sergeant is the watch commander. Minimim staffing is set per policy, but it's the sergeant's job to make sure enough people go out on his/her shift. It's that way at a great deal of departments.
            It has been a long time since I was with anyone that small and forgot how it is. Enjoy it, the grass is not always greener in the big city.

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            • #21
              we have a daily roll call here. Do something small which could end up being big. Have everyone practice "slicing the pie", doing quick peeks or stacking up and going through the fatal funnel. take turns being the bad guy and see if and when they see the cop. Do a basic equipment check not to bust guys ba!!s but to drive home the importance of them checking it. We always go over previous shifts calls, officer saftey addresses, wanted people ect.

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