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Any touching moments while on duty?

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  • Any touching moments while on duty?

    Yesterday I received a call of an accident at a construction site. On my arrival to the scene there were 2 victims. One was awake and alert and was being tended to by other construction workers. The second was not breathing and had no pulse. Myself,another officer,and a deputy started CPR but could not get him back. We went to the hospital and dropped them off,and I came back to the scene to get information for the report. When I got back,all these big,burly construction workers were standing off to the side,and the foreman walked up to me. He told me that his crew would like to talk to me. I walked over,and one by one with tears in their eyes,all those burly construction workers hugged me and thanked me for what I tried to do for their friend. I was very touched. To me,that is what the job is all about. I am interested in hearing any touching stories you would like to post. I am tired of only thinking,seeing,and hearing of the negative aspects of the job. I would like to hear of the good,if only for a little while.
    If you stare into the abyss long enough,sometimes it stares back.

  • #2
    I work all adult missing persons for our department. Most are back within a week or two, but some have been missing for quite a number of years or under circumstances that would suggest suicide or homicide. Over the last few years, I have been able to return a few of the ones who have been gone awhile to their loved ones (prior to me, unless there were obvious signs of foul play, they were not assigned to anyone in particular and got shuffled to the back of the filing cabinet). Even if they are returned in a body bag, the mothers especially are always appreciative that their child has come home and they can stop waiting by the phone or the door.

    There's been a few cases where a suspect's life has literally hung in the balance and we've been able to break apart a "victim's" story and let the accused go home. Although it may sound odd, making sure an innocent person is not wrongly accused is as rewarding as getting a conviction on one who deserved it.

    Kristen

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    • #3
      We had a drunk going the wrong way on the freeway head on a young couple. When we got there the husband had his wife's head in his lap sitting crosslegged on the ground. Her head was cracked open and her brain were exposed. She had her face messed up but she was struggling to breath through cut lips and massive amounts of blood. The paramedics got there and we had to pull him away, it broke all of our hearts. They didn't transport her they just waited for her to pass away. The drunk got 10 years and I got a memory that still brings tears to my eyes years later. The husband lost a beautiful wife and mother of his children.

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      • #4
        ofc129...not at all odd. Protecting the innocent is part of what we're about. None of us want an innocent person convicted.
        Paul

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        • #5
          In 13 years I've had three heavy drug users, all methamphetamine addicts, contact me after they've sobered up, gotten jobs, and gotten away from the drug lifestyle. Each one has told me I was the one of the main reasons they were succesful in sobering up.

          Of the three I know two have remained drug free for 8 years and 3 years respectively. The third is in a program right now so the jury is stil out on whether it will be long term.

          I'm not naive enough to think I saved these folks. They saved themselves. It just gives me a warm fuzzy to think they give me some credit though.
          If you see me running try to keep up!

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          • #6
            Couple of years ago, a mental patient waiting to be medically cleared at the ER simply walked out. Kinda in a catatonic, but walking state. We were told she would die if she didnt take a certain med, right away. The ER called the family, who promptly said she didnt return home, which prompted the local PD (me) to be called.

            Of course, we were given a description of an older WF in a hospital gowm, surely she would show up somewhere. After quite some time no calls were recieved and the regular patrol guys hadnt come up with anything. So I and a few others get out on foot, walking throughout our city, in the unincorporatied areas, checking old buidings etc.

            I walked for about a mile, along a canal, where I finally found her. She at first appeared dead, but we were able to determine she was breathing and had a pulse, she just wouldnt "wake up"..... The heat that day was well into the 100's and if she hadnt died of her illness (no meds) she would have simply laid there and died of exposure.

            Although no awards were given out (who cares about them anyway), her family thanked my Sergeant profusely, who of course told me. They were certain we saved her life, I dunno. Anyway,J. DIXON, it is nice to hear about the good things the job brings us.

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            • #7
              Yeah guys,there is not enough good news in this job to go around. I don't care about awards or recognition. My warm fuzzy comes when a person that you helped walks up and simply says thank you. I went to a domestic almost 2 years ago. Husband and wife were arguing about something stupid. I was able to sit down with them and help them hash things out,and they still have a good marriage today. While I was there,their 4 y/o daughter sat down and colored me a duck in her coloring book. She gave it to me to thank me for making things right in her family. I still have that duck. Every once in a while,when I get down about the job,I will pull it out just to look at it. It reminds me of who and what I am fighting for.
              If you stare into the abyss long enough,sometimes it stares back.

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              • #8
                The paramedics got there and we had to pull him away, it broke all of our hearts. They didn't transport her they just waited for her to pass away.
                Do me a favor....If I'm still breathing and my heart is still beating, and the EMS people don't want to take me to the hospital, unless there is someone at the scene with "MD" after their name, take me yourself and then look the other way if I recover and beat the **** out of the guy who thought I didn't have a chance.....I've seen and read of too many instances of people "coming back from the dead" to trust a fireman with making the decision to "pull the plug" when I'm still breathing.....

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                • #9
                  Had to do CPR on a 6 week old that didn't make it. Absolutley horrible and then I had to view the autopsy. I only had a couple years on and luckily no kids. The mom later sent me a card which I thought was pretty nice. Then the results came back they found heroin in the baby's system. Wanted to feed her card to her. I still thank about that baby everytime I hold my girls and it's been 6 years.

                  I really spend a lot of time with kids now when they are involved in a call. Usually the only ones I check on later and it's neat to see that they remember me weeks later. My partner usually makes a big impression on them to. A big goofy golden retriever drug dog can really take the scare away. Sometimes he does the same for me.

                  I'm glad I chose this field but there are some images that I will never get out of my head, good and bad.
                  admit nothing, deny everything, and demand proof!

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                  • #10
                    Was asked to stop by the jail about 2 years ago to speak with a mother and her son. As I arrived they looked as normal as any other family and thus we sat and started talking. The son (11 yrs. old) informed me that he had been considering suicide. He had even grab a knife that day and treatened to harm himself in front of his mother. he also said that he had at one point loaded his fathers shotgun but could not go through with it. After talking for some time and learning that his father was extremely abusive, I learned alot about why he was so down on life. I took the young boy off to a room by myself and we had a candid discussion about life and about how much I wanted him to succeed. I was later joined by my shift Lt. who added a few words of wisdom. We both told the boy that if he ever had an issue with his father that was not resolved in a civil manner to give us a call (gave him our dept. card and home numbers). To this day the boy has never had to call (mom got rid of the father and moved) and thank God he decided that taking his own life was not the path to take. When it was time for the young boy to leave the Jail conference room, he gave us both a long hug, said thank you and promised us that he would do something good with his life. There are times in your career when you just can't help but get a tear in your eye (the Lt. too).

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                    • #11
                      No touching moments yet, get cursed at alot though...
                      You have the right to remain silent....So SHUT THE #%*@ up!

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                      • #12
                        TOUCHING MOMENT? HEARTBREAKING MORE LIKE IT.

                        I'm a dispatcher that works for a very large department.
                        I'm a 'control operator' which for smaller departments with only one dispatcher means that I only recieve police radio transmissions. We have dispatchers that take 911 calls and we take care of the rest.
                        I've worked a particular sector for many many years and have had to deal with many officers that have fallen in the line of duty. It's always heartbreaking-certainly when you know them on a personal level and worked side by side with someone previously that made the jump from Dispatcher to LEO, which happens more often then not.
                        But SUICIDE-

                        I did not know him. I knew the voice on the radio-that was all. I wish I had known him. I wish I had been able to save him. He came into dispatch 2 days prior to his death to give another dispatcher a jump on her car. I realized he was one of my cars after he left radio and I then sent a message to his laptop jokingly asking why he didn't bother to come and say hi to his control operator. He replied that with his hideous features that he wouldn't have dared (he had surgery from cancer) I typed back what I thought was an uplifting message. He responded with something like "compliments like that will buy you breakfast". I don't even know what I typed back. All I know is 2 days later he didn't show up for roll call and as his co-workers walked out to their cars, they found him in his police car-Dead from a bullet to his head. He left a note although I don't know what it said.
                        The point of this post is that out of all the officers that I have talked to about this they have no sympathy for this man.
                        As a matter of fact, he was made fun of before his death for makeshift gear, such as cutting off the bottom of a flashlight tube to place his mace in on his duty belt,to scars from surgery, etc. It is just so heartbreaking to me that he felt it necessary to go to roll call parking lot and shoot himself. Knowing that he should have been in roll call and that his co-workers would come out and find him. Yes, I know the meaning of why he did it the way he did, but, it still breaks my heart that there was no one he felt he could talk to. I barely even knew this man and yet I feel a deep ache in my heart for him.
                        The department didn't even wait a month before they assigned his unit number to a rookie officer.
                        Before you slam another officer, before you make fun of them, before you start a rumor-Just remember that they may have many more problems you're not aware of. I have had to deal with many deaths and for some reason this one has bothered me the most of all. I'll always wonder if I could have said something different. I'll always wonder if he hadn't been made fun of so much if it would have happened. I'll just forever wonder about him. He had a son that was 11 years old. Of course, Suicides are never listed on the page of fallen officers. They're a disgrace to the department. They're a 'coward' in the department's eyes. This officer has a son that looked up to him as a hero, which he was, but no one ever saw it.

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                        • #13
                          One time, our station took in an injured deer that was struck by a car. We nursed him back to health and taught him to play backgammon. Then one day, he got sick and was diagnosed with TB. It's a big problem with deer around here. I had to take him out back and shoot him. Worst thing I ever had to do.....Well...second worst....The WORST was when we took this dog in.....raised him from a puppy....We called him "Old Red". Not because he was red in color, but just because we thought it was a cool name for a dog. Well, it came to pass that the sheep farmer who lived next to the station started finding his sheep dead out in the pasture. They was mangled up real bad, they was. We were sure it was the wolves that were tearing up his sheep, but he was sure it was Old Red. I had to take Old Red out back and shoot him. THAT was the worst thing I ever had to do on this job....No, wait....there was one more that was worse....We had a leadership problem in the department. The chief wasn't around, and we just didn't know what to do...One day, a cowboy happened into town. He was wise, and manly too. His name was "Blaine". He taught us all the things we needed to know, and was the chief-figure that we didn't have. Then, one day, after he had taught us many things, and instilled in us a sense of character....Well....I know, you're gonna think that I had to take him out back and shoot him...but I didn't. He just got on his horse and rode out of town...And we stood in front of the station and yelled "Blaine!!!!! Blaiiiiiiiiiiine!! Come back Blainnnneee!!!"
                          Last edited by ; 11-11-2003, 04:58 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Frank Booth
                            Do me a favor....If I'm still breathing and my heart is still beating, and the EMS people don't want to take me to the hospital, unless there is someone at the scene with "MD" after their name, take me yourself and then look the other way if I recover and beat the **** out of the guy who thought I didn't have a chance.....I've seen and read of too many instances of people "coming back from the dead" to trust a fireman with making the decision to "pull the plug" when I'm still breathing.....
                            Unfortunately, I have seen this. In one case a mutual aid ambulance arrived before our Paramedics at a highway wreck. The EMT's said that one of the victims, a young female was dead. Our paramedics showed up and one of them checked her anyway and found a pulse. She was treated, transported and survived even though lesser EMT's had already thrown a sheet over her head.
                            The People's Republic of Massachusetts

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                            • #15
                              The worst one was when I took a little boy to grand jury. He was about 8 and had been severely beaten and abused by a stepdad. The little guy had a bruise on his back that was a perfect imprint of a running shoe sole.

                              Anyway, we were quite a bit early and I walked around downtown with him and went into a store. I bought him a little cheap Star Wars toy, about 4 bucks to play with. We went to the grand jury waiting room and he was playing with the toy. He looked up at me and said, "I wish you were my dad." I about lost it right there. That kid was so appreciative of a 4 dollar toy and I thought about all the stuff my kids had and how little he did.
                              "Life's tough, it's tougher if you're stupid." John Wayne

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