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  • Fallen Officer Rituals

    We lost an on-duty officer this week in NYC. He was shot to death by a perp.

    When that perp was arraigned, he was brought into court in the dead officer's handcuffs, and had to walk a wall of a hundreds of officers who lined the walls of the court, and into a court room packed to capacity with officers and the fallen officer's family.

    All NYPD officers(and some other agencies like mine) wear a mourning band across their shields and purple and black bunting is hung on the fallen officer's precinct house. And of course, flags are flown at half staff.

    What rituals does your department do to mourn a fallen officer?
    “Every society gets the kind of criminal it deserves. What is equally true is that every community gets the kind of law enforcement it insists on.” - Robert F. Kennedy.

  • #2
    Lower a flag/mourning bands of course. Along with a plaque near the headquarters or area it happened. We also named a building after one who died.
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    • #3
      Never heard of the handcuffs thing, we do all the other standard things mentioned above - plus we have Memorial highways for some of the deputies/officers down as well as a county Law Enforcement Memorial
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      Any and all statements made by this account represent my sole opinion and do not reflect an official opinion, belief, or policy of any department or agency to which I am employed by. Further, I am in no way authorized to speak on behalf of any department or agency.

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      • #4
        My Force, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, has a Cenotaph at The RCMP Training Academy at Depot Division, in Regina, Saskatchewan (where ALL Regular Member successful applicants receive their 24 weeks of Basic Cadet Training) that has engraved upon its several faces the names of EVERY RCMP member that has died while on duty since 1873. Many of the streets, lanes, buildings and other facilities at our Academy are named for our members that have died in the line of duty, with the street name signs including the date and location of death.

        Most, if not all, of our Divisions (most Divisions are the Province that Division is located in, while Ontario is split up into 3) have their own Cenotaph or Place Of Remembrance for the RCMP members that died while serving in that particular Division.

        The RCMP has several Regimental Cemeteries across Canada, including 2 in Saskatchewan, where our members, whether they died on duty, or not, may be buried for no cost. The RCMP will cover some, if not all, of the costs of internment, providing either a Regimental Headstone / Plaque with our Regimental (badge) Number, or will help defray the cost of a regular stone / marker if it includes information about our service. A Regimental Funeral, usually for line-of-duty death, will often involve a horse, without rider, with our high-brown boots backwards in the stirrups, in the procession, with our stetson, gloves and boots displayed before the casket or urn.

        Each Regular Member of the RCMP is issued the Red Serge, stetson, boots, breeches and Sam Browne equipment in training, and provided gratis with replacement gear as required, and upon retirement in good standing are allowed to retain such kit and clothing, with the expectation that we will wear same with pride to another member's funeral or at state and formal occasions befitting such honour.
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        • #5
          Originally posted by PeteBroccolo View Post
          My Force, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, has a Cenotaph at The RCMP Training Academy at Depot Division, in Regina, Saskatchewan (where ALL Regular Member successful applicants receive their 24 weeks of Basic Cadet Training) that has engraved upon its several faces the names of EVERY RCMP member that has died while on duty since 1873. Many of the streets, lanes, buildings and other facilities at our Academy are named for our members that have died in the line of duty, with the street name signs including the date and location of death.

          Most, if not all, of our Divisions (most Divisions are the Province that Division is located in, while Ontario is split up into 3) have their own Cenotaph or Place Of Remembrance for the RCMP members that died while serving in that particular Division.

          The RCMP has several Regimental Cemeteries across Canada, including 2 in Saskatchewan, where our members, whether they died on duty, or not, may be buried for no cost. The RCMP will cover some, if not all, of the costs of internment, providing either a Regimental Headstone / Plaque with our Regimental (badge) Number, or will help defray the cost of a regular stone / marker if it includes information about our service. A Regimental Funeral, usually for line-of-duty death, will often involve a horse, without rider, with our high-brown boots backwards in the stirrups, in the procession, with our stetson, gloves and boots displayed before the casket or urn.

          Each Regular Member of the RCMP is issued the Red Serge, stetson, boots, breeches and Sam Browne equipment in training, and provided gratis with replacement gear as required, and upon retirement in good standing are allowed to retain such kit and clothing, with the expectation that we will wear same with pride to another member's funeral or at state and formal occasions befitting such honour.
          The RCMP is a class act. All the way. If the United States ever had a national Policing entity, I would hope that it was half as good as the RCMP.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NYCDep View Post
            We lost an on-duty officer this week in NYC. He was shot to death by a perp.

            When that perp was arraigned, he was brought into court in the dead officer's handcuffs, and had to walk a wall of a hundreds of officers who lined the walls of the court, and into a court room packed to capacity with officers and the fallen officer's family.

            All NYPD officers(and some other agencies like mine) wear a mourning band across their shields and purple and black bunting is hung on the fallen officer's precinct house. And of course, flags are flown at half staff.

            What rituals does your department do to mourn a fallen officer?
            Out here in LA, the DAs office would have a stroke if you even thought of doing that.....they have even sent out countywide JDIC messages specifically requesting that we limit the presence of the uniformed LEOs in the courtroom doing any court precedings.

            There is still a strong presence there, but we have to be very careful of how it is viewed by the court itself.....it can cause major issues down the road.
            The posts on this forum by this poster are of his personal opinion, and his personal opinion alone

            "Politicians are like diapers. They need to be changed often and for the same reason"

            "We fight not for glory; nor for wealth; nor honor, but only and alone we fight for freedom, which no good man surrenders but with his life"

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            • #7
              When a California peace officer dies in the line of duty, an Executive Order of the Governor requires that the state flag be flown at half mast over the State Capitol Building. That flag, along with a certificate recognizing the officer's service is presented to the next of kin at the funeral by the California Highway Patrol, or to a representative of his department for presentation by them to the next of kin at a later time.

              In addition statewide, most California officers wear a mourning band on their badge until midnight on the date of the officer's funeral.
              Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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              • #8
                Packing a courtroom is a common occurence in NYC. Any trial that involves NYPD officers as either victims or defendants will draw large numbers of off-duty officers. The judges expect that and know not to make a big deal.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dinosaur32 View Post
                  Packing a courtroom is a common occurence in NYC. Any trial that involves NYPD officers as either victims or defendants will draw large numbers of off-duty officers. The judges expect that and know not to make a big deal.
                  Wish it worked that way out here.....most judges would tell us to get out of the court room unless we were there on official business....IE: had a subpeona for that case.....

                  It is seen as predjudicing (yes...that is misspelled....spell checker is out) the jury here.......they will allow a small number of LEOs in the courtroom, and the family members of course....
                  The posts on this forum by this poster are of his personal opinion, and his personal opinion alone

                  "Politicians are like diapers. They need to be changed often and for the same reason"

                  "We fight not for glory; nor for wealth; nor honor, but only and alone we fight for freedom, which no good man surrenders but with his life"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dinosaur32 View Post
                    . The judges expect that and know not to make a big deal.
                    The judges just plain wouldn't allow it to happen in Iowa.

                    Much the same reasoning that LA DEP is talking about.

                    Off duty officers in civilian clothes MIGHT be allowed but not a packed court of uniforms.................



                    The perp walk isn't used in the Midwest either





                    In the last 6 months here in Iowa we lost 3 officers.................The deputy that was killed in a stand off had a funeral that was phenomenal. ...............nearly 1000 officers. The body was escorted EVERYWHERE by a fully outfitted honor guard 24/7 from the time of death to burial. Pretty much every department in the state that had an honor guard participated at one point or another. Mourning badge covers were wore statewide until after the funeral. His killer was shot/killed by the responding Tactical Team



                    A state trooper was killed in motor vehicle crash.......................The cause is still unknown. Once again his funeral was attended by cops from all over...............mourning covers on the badges statewide until after the funeral.


                    My small department lost an officer to suicide...................we had over 100 officers attend the funeral from all over the state...................Honor Guard at the visitation and funeral. The mourning cover was worn pretty much state wide until the funeral.................the two departments that the officer worked for retained the mourning covers for 30 days.
                    Last edited by Iowa #1603; 12-15-2011, 10:34 AM.
                    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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                    • #11
                      I find a nice quiet place somewhere and pray that the POS dies a slow, horrible, painful death. Then I fantasize about it.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by LA DEP View Post
                        Out here in LA, the DAs office would have a stroke if you even thought of doing that.....they have even sent out countywide JDIC messages specifically requesting that we limit the presence of the uniformed LEOs in the courtroom doing any court precedings.

                        There is still a strong presence there, but we have to be very careful of how it is viewed by the court itself.....it can cause major issues down the road.
                        That is not the case at all in NY. There's pretty much a gauntlet of officers lined up for the family and perp all the way from the doors into court and into the court room.

                        “Every society gets the kind of criminal it deserves. What is equally true is that every community gets the kind of law enforcement it insists on.” - Robert F. Kennedy.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by NYCDep
                          There's pretty much a gauntlet of officers lined up for the family and perp all the way from the doors into court and into the court room.
                          Impressive... I like it.
                          All Gave Some - Some Gave All

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                          • #14
                            Given the state of the justice system, it is probably a good idea for all those cops to remember the bad guys face.

                            He'll probably be back on the streets in a couple years, and will be just as dangerous as before.

                            M-11
                            “All men dream...... But not equally..
                            Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find it is vanity;
                            but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men,
                            for they act their dreams with open eyes to make it possible.....”

                            TE Lawrence

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                            • #15
                              We have roads named after our fallen. I really like the handcuff idea...
                              Last edited by Dep D; 12-16-2011, 08:42 AM.
                              Be safe pulling back into the thread...
                              http://infidelswithhonor.com/

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