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Frustrated with Juries!!

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  • That Guy
    replied
    Whatever the reason just do your job. The most important thing is that you go home at the end of the shift and your health. None of this will matter when you retire..I hope.

    Leave a comment:


  • mikeymedic
    replied
    That is why I don't stay around after the jury goes into deliberation. I tell myself that the offender got the max and leave it at that. I stuck around for a trial a few weeks ago (I was not involved in the case) to see the outcome of a fake bomb threat called into a school with 3 distinct crimes, and 3 counts per crime. The kid got nothing, all charges were dropped due to "limited language."

    If you can leave before hearing the verdict....do it.

    Leave a comment:


  • RoadKingTrooper
    replied
    Originally posted by SRT936 View Post
    All the time.

    I learned years ago to put together the best case I possibly can and hand it off to the system without looking back. I've lost cases that were slam dunks and gotten convictions on cases that I was shocked to learn we were going to trial on. Often going to the jury is a roll of the dice, for both sides.
    SRT is right! Your job is done when you filed the case, worrying about or getting upset by Plea deals and convictions will only harm YOU. It ain't worth the stress, You did your job, let it go for your own sanity

    Leave a comment:


  • LawFowl
    replied
    I've been to trial once and she got 20 days for her 2nd DWI! 6 women on the jury!

    Keep working hard and don't worry about stuff you can't control. I know it sucks.

    Leave a comment:


  • mtxpro752
    replied
    Dude if you really want to get mad, come file some cases in LA county. In particular LA metropolitan court.

    You have guys get arrested for an ADW with gang enhancement for stabbing a random person for violating gang turf, calling out their gang as they commit the crime, have gang tats all over their face and arms, yelling their gang outloud in court when they get mad at their public defender etc all to have a jury drop the gang enhancement, stating they just couldn't believe that the stabbing was to benefit the gang. Then they drop the ADW to misd battery and the gangster walks out on summary probation.

    Saw that exact scenario twice last year.

    Leave a comment:


  • jswwjw
    replied
    I have always felt (and I am in S. Mississippi as well) that they will ALWAYS spend more time in jail when I arrest them then they will ever spend after trial. Keep up the good work, keep looking forward and be safe.

    Leave a comment:


  • OneAdam12
    replied
    Originally posted by SRT936 View Post
    All the time.

    I learned years ago to put together the best case I possibly can and hand it off to the system without looking back. I've lost cases that were slam dunks and gotten convictions on cases that I was shocked to learn we were going to trial on. Often going to the jury is a roll of the dice, for both sides.
    This
    Originally posted by Dinosaur32 View Post
    WTPD, As SRT does, you do your job as best you can and then the prosecutor takes over. Remember it is the "People" not Officer WTPD prosecuting the case. If the prosecutor fails to get a conviction it is no reflection on your abilities. When you are much closer to retirement, you'll look back and realize that the jury system does work. Juries usually reach the verdict supported by the evidence.
    and this

    Leave a comment:


  • Iowa #1603
    replied
    I lost a DUI with a test of .278 at a jury trial.

    The jury didn't believe the Forensic Chemist----because he was a "state employee" rather than making big bucks with his Phd.


    That one actually got me called into the Judge's chambers------(2 days later when he saw me on another case)---------------he wanted to tell me it wasn't my fault

    Leave a comment:


  • Dinosaur32
    replied
    WTPD, As SRT does, you do your job as best you can and then the prosecutor takes over. Remember it is the "People" not Officer WTPD prosecuting the case. If the prosecutor fails to get a conviction it is no reflection on your abilities. When you are much closer to retirement, you'll look back and realize that the jury system does work. Juries usually reach the verdict supported by the evidence.

    Leave a comment:


  • SRT936
    replied
    Originally posted by WTPD3534 View Post
    Anybody else been seeing juries having unrealistic expectations and the inability to understand the law?
    All the time.

    I learned years ago to put together the best case I possibly can and hand it off to the system without looking back. I've lost cases that were slam dunks and gotten convictions on cases that I was shocked to learn we were going to trial on. Often going to the jury is a roll of the dice, for both sides.

    Leave a comment:


  • WTPD3534
    replied
    Originally posted by S&WGUY! View Post
    demotivational posters - THE JUSTICE SYSTEM
    see more Very Demotivational

    While this is sort of backwards, I believe it still applies...
    You know that very same thought was running through my head on the drive home yesterday! lol

    Even his defense attorney was shaking his head after the verdict and said to me the law is too complicated for people to understand when it comes to intent to distribute. Oh well at least the conviction gets an enhancer for the next case if the ATF doesn't end up picking it up like they are supposed to.

    Leave a comment:


  • S&WGUY!
    replied
    demotivational posters - THE JUSTICE SYSTEM
    see more Very Demotivational

    While this is sort of backwards, I believe it still applies...

    Leave a comment:


  • ryker
    replied
    Probably several members of the jury either take drugs (legal or illegal) or a direct family does. So having three types of drugs means nothing when bobs sons age 12 takes a narcotic to wake up, one to make him focus and one to calm him down plus ambien at bedtime.

    Point is drugs are more common than ever before.

    Leave a comment:


  • SCDetective
    replied
    I have come to the conclusion that the average jury has the equivalent of a 1st grade education. Each individual may be geniuses, but there is something about the deliberation room that shuts down most of their brain.

    I've had slam-dunk cases get found not guilt, and so-so cases get found guilty...juries are very unpredictable in most cases.

    Keep your head up...you did your job.

    Leave a comment:


  • Iowa #1603
    replied
    It happens....................................and it is nothing new.



    In 1975 a well known Disc Jockey in Des Moines Iowa was charged with hiring a hit man to kill his wife. The hit man was a state police detective.

    Remembering that this was 1975 video wasn't what it is today-----------------but the SP had rented two motel rooms, & video taped the entire transaction where the man counted out the money, placed it in the hands of the "hit man" and specifically told the hit man to "Kill my wife"

    I attended part of the trial as I was in LE classes at the time.......................................I saw the video. The trial was moved to a place as far away from Des Moines as possible and still be in the state.


    A "Johnny Cochran" type attorney defended the idiot. He got the wife to sit directly behind his client throughout the trial AND testify that she didn't believe that he really wanted her killed.


    The jury acquitted.

    Then next day the wife filed an uncontested divorce.

    Leave a comment:

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