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  • Studded tires on Vic for police work?

    Any agency do it? We where going to try it on a patrol car, just the back two tires, they did it years back. But the state Surplus tire people said it could be a major lawsuit because the tires with studs are only rated at highway speeds., not in excess. Go in excess get in a crash agency is liable. at high speeds, 100 mph+ the stubs push threw the tire and destroy it we where told. So we are settled on set of pursuit rated snow tire for now, better then just the normal pursuit slicks we run.
    "What the problem is?"

  • #2
    Originally posted by Red Swan View Post
    Any agency do it?
    Probably not, since studded tires are illegal in most states.
    “Truth is not what you want it to be; it is what it is, and you must bend to its power or live a lie.”

    Miyamoto Musashi

    “Life Is Hard, But It's Harder When You're Stupid”

    George V. Higgins (from The Friends of Eddie Coyle)

    Comment


    • #3
      CHP uses them in heavy snow and freeze areas. We don't use them in pursuits, however. Studded on all four tires. When I worked the mountains I loved them; especially, on the steeper grades. Good traction and minimal slippage.

      These are California's laws that apply to the use of snow tires, traction devices and studded tires. All are contained in the Vehicle Code:

      Snow-tread Tire

      558. A "snow-tread tire" is a tire which has a relatively deep and aggressive tread pattern compared with conventional passenger tread pattern.


      Added Ch. 26, Stats. 1961. Effective September 15, 1961

      Tire Traction Devices

      605. "Tire traction devices" are devices or mechanisms having a composition and design capable of improving vehicle traction, braking, and cornering ability upon snow or ice-covered surfaces. Tire traction devices shall be constructed and assembled to provide sufficient structural integrity and to prevent accidental detachment from vehicles. Tire traction devices shall, at the time of manufacture or final assembly, bear a permanent impression indicating the name, initials, or trademark of the assembling company or primary manufacturer, and the country in which the devices were manufactured or assembled in final form.


      Added Ch. 71, Stats. 1990. Effective May 1, 1990.



      Protuberances on Tires: Exceptions

      27454. ( )1 A tire on ( )2 a vehicle upon a highway shall not have on its periphery any block, stud, flange, cleat, ridge, bead, or any other protuberance of metal or wood that projects beyond the tread of the traction surface of the tire.

      This section does not apply to any of the following:

      (a) Tire traction devices of reasonable size used to prevent skidding when upon wet surfaces or when upon snow or ice.

      (b) Pneumatic tires that have embedded therein wire not to exceed 0.075 of an inch in diameter and that are constructed so ( )3 that under no conditions will the percentage of metal in contact with the roadway exceed 5 percent of the total tire area in contact with the roadway, except that during the first 1,000 miles of use or operation of the tire, the metal in contact with the roadway may exceed 5 percent of the tire area in contact with the roadway, but shall in no event exceed 20 percent of the area.

      (c) Vehicles operated upon unimproved roadways when necessary in the construction or repair of highways.

      (d) Traction engines or tractors when operated under the conditions of a permit first obtained from the Department of Transportation.

      (e) (1) Pneumatic tires containing metal-type studs of tungsten carbide or other suitable material that are ( )4 inserted or constructed so that under no ( )5 condition will the number of studs or the percentage of metal in contact with the roadway exceed 3 percent of the total tire area in contact with the roadway, between November 1 and April 30 of each year. ( )6 A vehicle may be equipped year-round with tires that have studs that retract pneumatically or mechanically when not in use, ( )7 if the ( )8 studs are retracted between May 1 and October 31 of ( )9 each year. A tire on a vehicle shall not be worn to a point at which ( )10 the ( )11studs protrude beyond the ( )12 tire tread when retracted.

      (2) ( )13 The commissioner, after consultation with the Department of Transportation, may extend the period during which the studded pneumatic tires may be used with studs deployed or inserted in ( )14 areas of the state for the protection of the public because of adverse weather conditions.

      (f) Pneumatic tires used on an authorized emergency vehicle, as defined in Section 165, containing metal-type studs of tungsten carbide or other suitable material, if the studs are ( )4 inserted or constructed so that under no conditions will the number of studs or the percentage of metal in contact with the roadway exceed 3 percent of the total tire area in contact with the roadway. Notwithstanding subdivision (e), authorized emergency vehicles are permitted the unrestricted use of studded pneumatic tires throughout the year.

      Amended Sec. 22, Ch. 828, Stats. 1998. Effective January 1, 1999.
      Amended Sec. 1, Ch. 220, Stats. 2008. Effective January 1, 2009.
      The 2008 amendment added the italicized material, and at the point(s) indicated, deleted the following:

      “No”
      “any”
      “constructed”
      “so”
      “conditions”
      “The commissioner”
      “after consultation with”
      “Department”
      “Transportation, may extend the period during”
      “studded pneumatic tires may be used in any area of”
      “state for ”
      “protection of the public because of adverse weather conditions”
      “Pneumatic tires containing metal-type studs of tungsten carbide or other suitable material that are so inserted or constructed that under no conditions will the number of studs or the percentage of metal in contact with the roadway exceed 3 percent of the total tire area in contact with the roadway, between November 1 and April 30 of each year.”
      “any area ”

      Tire Traction Device

      27459. No person shall operate any motor vehicle, trailer or semitrailer upon any portion of a highway without tire traction devices when that portion of the highway is signed for the requirement of tire traction devices. In any case where a passenger vehicle or motortruck having an unladen weight of 6,000 pounds or less may be required by the Department of Transportation or local authorities to be equipped with tire traction devices, the devices shall be placed on at least two drive wheels, or the department or local authorities may provide, in the alternative, that the vehicle may be equipped with snow-tread tires on at least two drive wheels when the weather and surface conditions at the time are such that the stopping, tractive, and cornering abilities of the snow-tread tires are adequate. The snow-tread tires shall be of a type and design manufactured for use on snow as a replacement for tire chains or tire traction devices, shall be in good condition, and shall bear the marking of M-S, M/S, or other marking indicating that the tire was manufactured for use on snow, or, in the case of tires purchased before January 1, 1987, shall either bear the markings or, in the opinion of the inspecting officer, comply with the tread pattern requirements of Section 558.


      Amended Ch. 71, Stats. 1990. Effective May 1, 1990.


      Four-Wheel Drive Vehicles With Snow-Tread Tires

      27460. Any passenger vehicle or motor truck having an unladen weight of 6,500 pounds or less and operated and equipped with four-wheel drive and with snow-tread tires on all four drive wheels may be operated upon any portion of a highway without tire traction devices, notwithstanding the fact that the highway is signed for the requirement of those devices and provided that tire traction devices for at least one set of drive wheels are carried in or upon the vehicle. The snow tread tires shall meet the requirements specified in Section 27459 of this code, and such vehicle shall not, when so operated, tow another vehicle except as may be necessary to move a disabled vehicle from the roadway.

      No person shall use those tires on four-wheel drive vehicles in place of tire traction devices whenever weather and roadway conditions at the time are such that the stopping, tractive and cornering abilities of the tires are not adequate or whenever the Department of Transportation or local authorities, in their respective jurisdictions, place signs prohibiting their operation unless equipped with tire traction devices.

      Amended Ch. 71, Stats. 1990. Effective May 1, 1990.
      Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence!

      [George Washington (1732 - 1799)]

      Comment


      • #4
        BE CAREFUL - All 4 tires should be the same in modern vehicles, regardless of what you do. Only doing rear wheels with snow tires or studded tires will alter computer-assisted technologies such as ABS, traction control, rollover protection, etc.
        Why Four Winter Tires? I Thought I Would Only Need Two.

        Today's winter tires are better at providing ice and snow traction than ever before. The technology used to develop the tread designs and tread compounds has evolved beyond what you may have used previously. Every one of our tire manufacturers and 7 out of 10 vehicle manufacturers recommend four winter tires be used on rear wheel, front wheel or four wheel drive vehicles. This is because if you use two dissimilar types of tires on your vehicle, you'll have a vehicle that has a "split" personality. One end of the vehicle won't react and perform the same as the other in the dry, wet, slush and snow conditions you'll encounter before the end of winter. Especially in emergency situations, you'll find that your vehicle will probably understeer in one condition and oversteer in another. It is preferable to keep your vehicles handling as consistently as possible by "matching" all four tires. Our customers who have matched their tires tell us they're glad they made the extra investment in four winter tires (and wheels) so they can accelerate, brake, handle and better control their vehicle through winter's challenges.
        We have good luck with snow tires on the CVPI's. You will need to check the speed rating on the sidewalls... most mainstream winter tires are Q or 99mph rated. The problem with studs at higher speed is that they will literally spin out of the tire from centrifugal force.

        If it's truly bad (i.e. feet of snow) we have marked Expedition, Explorers, and F-150 for use.
        Last edited by Resq14; 10-30-2009, 08:43 PM.
        All Gave Some - Some Gave All

        {"data-align":"none","data-size":"custom","data-tempid":"temp_14312_1475388990098_890","height":"65","title":"flower.gif","width":"72"}

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        • #5
          Come September we put studded tires on all our crown vics and expeditions...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by slamdunc View Post
            Probably not, since studded tires are illegal in most states.
            actually they are legal in most states: Tire Stud Regulations

            thanks for inputs. we also got some 4 wheel drive rides for the deep stuff, if its way to deep we got snow plows to bust trails and access to a tracked Polaris Ranger. Be surprised how much snow a vic will go to, i have pushed snow with bumper and kept going, as long as u got momentum your good. Start spinning and stop your one screwed duck.
            Last edited by Red Swan; 10-31-2009, 04:18 AM.
            "What the problem is?"

            Comment


            • #7
              They tend to tear up the roads. Just stick with the kitty litter in the trunk and don't drive like an *** when the roads are covered in ice.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Red Swan View Post
                actually they are legal in most states: Tire Stud Regulations

                thanks for inputs. we also got some 4 wheel drive rides for the deep stuff, if its way to deep we got snow plows to bust trails and access to a tracked Polaris Ranger. Be surprised how much snow a vic will go to, i have pushed snow with bumper and kept going, as long as u got momentum your good. Start spinning and stop your one screwed duck.
                That stupid website is wrong about SD. They are severely regulated by other statues and they can only be rubber and if they damage the road in anyway your going to be paying for a new strip of asphalt.

                Comment


                • #9
                  They are considered a necessity here. They make all the difference in the world. And we don't change our speed or pursuit policies at all with them.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by wirefire2 View Post
                    That stupid website is wrong about SD. They are severely regulated by other statues and they can only be rubber and if they damage the road in anyway your going to be paying for a new strip of asphalt.
                    It is correct for Iowa...............................
                    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      We used to have them for when it got deep, but we now have Impalas that get around just as good as the CVPI with studs. That and the seats moving up and down in so many ways, are the only good thing I can think to say for my Impala

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Studded tires??? we're luck if any of them can retain air!
                        Last edited by 1062PP; 11-04-2009, 05:06 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Get two issued with every car in my agency.(Arkansas) As long as they are the same size, or real close, there are no problems with ABS, traction control etc. They are not safe over 50-55 MPH, although I sometimes run up to 90 or so (straight stretches only) for short periods, and you have to really watch it in curves. Most of us mount them on a extra set of wheels, and swap them out as soon as the roads are clear. They work great! Wouldn't want to be without them! The first year of the Chargers, nobody made a studded tire in 18". Guys were issued "cable chains". They sucked! Nobody I know liked them at all. Studs are the only way to go for a rear wheel drive vehicle.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            You swap out studded tires on a per-storm basis??? First time I've heard of that being done!

                            Differing front/rear tires absolutely changes the handling of a car, and I would not recommend doing so. We don't install 4 winter tires per car just to p!$$ away money...

                            We don't get the most snow in the country, but we do get our fair share.
                            All Gave Some - Some Gave All

                            {"data-align":"none","data-size":"custom","data-tempid":"temp_14312_1475388990098_890","height":"65","title":"flower.gif","width":"72"}

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Resq14 View Post
                              You swap out studded tires on a per-storm basis??? First time I've heard of that being done!

                              Differing front/rear tires absolutely changes the handling of a car, and I would not recommend doing so. We don't install 4 winter tires per car just to p!$$ away money...

                              We don't get the most snow in the country, but we do get our fair share.
                              Sure, it only takes about 10-15 minutes, and it means you can go about anywhere. The car handles fine as long as you don't do any high speed stuff, which there is not much call for when the highways are covered in snow/ice. The roads clear up, take them back off. We have home storage with our units, a floor jack and a 4-way, and tires already mounted on wheels, and you can be ready to go in just a few minutes. We don't NOT go to calls just because the roads are bad, and we don't enough 4 wheel drives to go around. I have never failed to get to a call on the highway because my CV (with studded rear tires) couldn't make it.
                              Last edited by Mike11; 11-09-2009, 12:06 AM.

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