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I really stumbled tonight

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  • I really stumbled tonight

    Domestic dispute call and I was first on scene. I could see people outside and heard people yelling in the house as soon as I got there.

    Husband is drunk as always, but not much of a problem, but can be from past dealings.

    Two other deputies are with family and husband starts yelling at soon to be ex-wife. I escort him towards the side of the house to tell him to calm down and get him away from the wife.

    As we are walking in the dark, my foot hits a hole and down I go. The other Deputy thought the guy pushed me down and is over me yelling at the guy to hit the ground in no time flat.

    It was a first, I just had a really sick feeling pulling myself off the ground.

    I hate to admit it, but it kind of got to me. I know its not a big deal, but still was a sick feeling.

  • #2
    At least you had a good back up man. Don't feel bad, tonight I slipped down a flight of wet stairs for a burglar alarm.
    Last edited by reils49; 09-15-2009, 12:58 AM.
    I make my living on Irish welfare.

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    • #3
      It happens, I'd rather fall in front of a drunk than a sober person... at least they won't remember it in the morning.

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      • #4
        Always have that flashlight on you.

        If the suspect was cuffed, you're probably lucky you were the one who fell.

        M-11
        “All men dream...... But not equally..
        Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find it is vanity;
        but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men,
        for they act their dreams with open eyes to make it possible.....”

        TE Lawrence

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        • #5
          The lack of situational awareness and "tunnel vision" occurs to some degree even in situations with lesser degrees of stress (you don't need to be in a pursuit or shooting). 20+ years ago a sergeant I worked with was on a "routine" surveillance on some narco sales activity in a park. He was jogging from one position to another (to get a better view) in a dark alley, when he fell about 8-9 feet into an uncovered utility access hole. He cracked a couple ribs and injured his back, but returned to work in a few weeks. I went to his retirement party a couple of nights ago and he told me he still has pain associated with that injury.

          These kinds of situations are very common in this line of work and far more cops are disabled/retired because of misplaced steps than attacks by offenders or high speed crashes.
          "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

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          • #6
            We had a barricaded subject with a hostage one night out in the boonies. Us along with county and some troopers were on scene. SWAT was not called out but luckily some of our patrol SWAT guys and county SWAT guys were there and decided to make entry. My sergeant pulls out his AR and starts advancing and falls right in a huge puddle maybe two feet deep and he goes down to all fours. We couldnt stop playing back the dashcam on that one!

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            • #7
              As others have said, it happens with this job.

              I think the odds are stacked against us that we will end up on light duty at some point in our career. I'd like to think that should I ever get injured on the job, I would be saving a life, etc. But the reality is it will probably be from a slip on the ice, a tumble down some stairs...or like you, tripping in a hole. I've done all of these so far but luckily it was only my pride that was hurt...Chances are it will happen again at some point in the next 20 years.

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              • #8
                Hell, wouldn't be the first time, won't be the last. Your safe, one in custody and your partner had your back. Does not get much better than that.

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                • #9
                  It Could Have Been Worse

                  One night two of my guys were passing through South Central Los Angeles when they came across a guy who was emptying an entire dump truck full of garbage in the middle of an isolated street. They turned on their overheads and approached him, only to have the suspect take off on foot through a vacant lot. When my officers went after him, one of them stepped in a gopher hole, fell and dislocated his shoulder, writhing on the ground in pain.

                  An LAPD helicopter happened by as my officers were pulling up. Their attention was caught by the red and blur lights of the patrol car. They had no idea what prompted our contact with the suspect. They simply saw the foot pursuit, saw my officer go down and writhe on the ground in pain, and broadcast an officer down call.

                  By the time I arrived, LAPD had emptied out all of two divisions and set up a three block perimeter. There were so many black and whites surrounding the area I had to drive around the perimeter twice before I could even find my officers. When I got there I was contacted by an LAPD Lenient who told me they taken three K9s of their leashes, released them into the neighborhood to go after the bad guy and just wanted to confirm that my officer had been injured at the hands of the suspect and that we wanted him for assault with a deadly weapon on a peace officer. When I told him my officer tripped in a gopher hole and the only thing we wanted the suspect for was littering, the LAPD Lieutenant went into a panic and started screaming into his radio, "Call the dogs back, call the dogs back!" Apparently the helicopter observer had assumed my officer was injured at the hands of the suspect and because we were on two different radio systems and unable to communicate and clarify things. matters spiraled downhill from there.

                  We never got the suspect, but we did take his dump truck as a trophy.
                  Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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                  • #10
                    One of our best young officers stepped off a curb at the wrong angle during a foot pursuit. He broke his ankle, it failed to heal properly and lead to chronic back problems. He had about three years on the department at the time and the city forced him to retire within two years of the injury. He took it very, very badly, that his career was lost trying to catch some underage kid who'd been drinking a beer.
                    "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

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                    • #11
                      My partner fell through some stairs while checking a basement. He only fell a few feet and was mostly ok(twisted ankle). He said the worst part was those seconds after he fell that he was completely unaware of his immediate surroundings and the fact that anyone could have jumped him.

                      The nature of our business is that we know the worst case scenario and always have to prepare for it. When we get knocked out of our zone, that thought always jumps at us.
                      “Every society gets the kind of criminal it deserves. What is equally true is that every community gets the kind of law enforcement it insists on.” - Robert F. Kennedy.

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                      • #12
                        I chased a jump from a stolen car and run one night on third shift. The kid ran up a fire escape to the third landing. It was pitch black up there in the shadows and I was trying to maintain light discipline with my flashlight because the landings and stair treads were that open mesh steel grate stuff. I got about two steps from the top landing and stepped into an open hole where the tread was supposed to be! HOLY $&*%!! I wiggled up and found a 15 yr old squatted in the corner. If he'd been armed, or really wanted to get away, he could've had me. I had the shivers later thinking about all the possible outcomes of that one.
                        "...Because some men aren't looking for anything logical, like money. They can't be bought, bullied, reasoned or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn."

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                        • #13
                          Clearing a house by myself I stepped into the attic, lost my footing and fell halfway through the ceiling above the kitchen. I still have pain in my right side at times, especially when wearing my vest.

                          Parents called us on their dope headed son that they were finally tired of after 20 some odd years and said he had warrrants with a local municipality. Knowing he would run we approached the trailer with minimal lighting used.
                          Everything was fine when we got to the trailer, which had no steps...we heaved ourselves in...cleared it...didn't find anyone and I followed the other officer out. Jumped down ...started to walk and in the pitch black, misjudged where the stone was and slipped off it, landing on my face ... I swear to God I heard the turd we were looking for laugh at me...hell, I laughed at me...the officer who had my back was genuinely concerned..me, I was more concerned I fell in a spider web...I don't like bugs...especially spiders and roaches.

                          It happens to everyone
                          Moooooooooooo, I'm a goat

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                          • #14
                            The dangers of working in rural areas come from many things. One night we were working a drug warrant and one of the narcs, who always dressed to the 9s in a suit, decided that he was going to take the back side of a house we were running the paper on. He hops the fence and runs to the back of the house house. There are certain things that you have to be careful about in rural back yards. One are large dogs, the other is septic tanks. Sometimes they come in pairs. As the dog was starting to chase him, he runs for the safety of the house right as he got close he hit the lid to the septic tank and down he went into the crap. He wanted to shoot us and the crook, who were all laughing our collective butts off. The sad part was that the dog was a lap dog with a lot of bark, but he only wanted to lick you to death after he caught you. Needless to say the dog wouldn't even lick him then. He never took the back side of a house again.
                            Ut humiliter opinor

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ddurkof View Post
                              The dangers of working in rural areas come from many things. One night we were working a drug warrant and one of the narcs, who always dressed to the 9s in a suit, decided that he was going to take the back side of a house we were running the paper on. He hops the fence and runs to the back of the house house. There are certain things that you have to be careful about in rural back yards. One are large dogs, the other is septic tanks. Sometimes they come in pairs. As the dog was starting to chase him, he runs for the safety of the house right as he got close he hit the lid to the septic tank and down he went into the crap. He wanted to shoot us and the crook, who were all laughing our collective butts off. The sad part was that the dog was a lap dog with a lot of bark, but he only wanted to lick you to death after he caught you. Needless to say the dog wouldn't even lick him then. He never took the back side of a house again.
                              Gents take this lesson to heart:

                              He who takes the back door, shall be covered in poop.
                              I make my living on Irish welfare.

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