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  • HCSO511
    replied
    Originally posted by M-11 View Post
    I don't think my office has this problem.

    I'm not really sure though, as I am on leave and away for training a lot...

    M-11

    Lololololol!!!!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Smurfette_76
    replied
    Originally posted by skigoggles View Post
    Quit worrying about what other people are doing. You're not their supervisor.

    If others are constantly covering it is their business.

    Leave a comment:


  • 5031OKC
    replied
    One thing to keep in mind: wait until they request donated sick leave. Whenever someone on our department requests donated sick leave I do some checking into things if I'm considering donating. Why are they needing the donated leave. What has their leave usage been like in the past. If you are dealing with something legitimate (you have cancer or your newborn baby if fighting for life in an incubator) you pass the first test. HOWEVER even if you have a legit reason for needing the leave, if I check and find out you were one of those people who took off every time they had a headache or were always getting "sick" on the first and last days of their work set, don't expect any leave donation from me. I look at it this way: if you abuse your leave, don't cry when it isn't there when you really need it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jenners
    replied
    I know I'm not one...I'm too intimidated by our time sheet system to try to figure out how to take time off...

    Leave a comment:


  • skigoggles
    replied
    Quit worrying about what other people are doing. You're not their supervisor.

    Leave a comment:


  • CUFFS137
    replied
    As for the slugs who tweak the system any way they can to get out of work...They are everywhere I suppose. As for the guys who are regularly off the street doing 'other functions'...I can't comment on them as I may very well be considered that guy. I wear many hats at work...I'm on my PD's SWAT team which is a periferal duty. I'm an instructor in varios courses at the police academy for both recruits, and in service training for active officers. I'm an instructor at my PD in multiple areas.
    Because of the requirements, and obligations that come with these assignments, I am often not on the street although I am assigned to a patrol platoon. I attend many training courses as well to ensure that I am, as a trainier, knowledgable. I'm sure that there is a level of resentment against me, but the multitude of assignments that I carry out are all nessessary functions. Just because I am not on patrol, does not mean that I am not working.
    I try to make up for this by being especially pro-actice when I am on the street (which keeps my bosses happy).

    I am hoping that this is not what is meant when a few of you reference officers that are constantly off training, and not working.
    Last edited by CUFFS137; 03-22-2009, 06:16 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • M-11
    replied
    I don't think my office has this problem.

    I'm not really sure though, as I am on leave and away for training a lot...

    M-11

    Leave a comment:


  • Code4SIC
    replied
    Originally posted by powerstroked View Post
    There is this person on my shift that is never at work! When the Sgt says "There is this training that is coming down the line who wants to go?" Guess who's hand shoots up first. And when they arnt at training they are playing the well i have family coming into town, I am sick, the kids are sick, and I think my dog will get ran over during the shift so i need to stay home and cry about it cards. I really don't see how this person can have anytime left on the books but they do. They have missed so much work they are clueless at calls. Know the feeling you get on that first call when you have been off for 2 weeks? They must not know what its like to NOT have that feeling.

    I am looking for some ideas to handle this on the shift level any input?

    This is a serious morale eroding problem. Thoughtless individuals as you've described, and as I'm also sure, you have experienced, tend not to respond to peer pressure in any substantive way. As has already been covered at length in previous posts, supervisors may not have a tool with which to address this either if the malingerer is just manipulating the system in this way or there is nothing more to work with.

    I know of employees who are so well educated on playing the system they virtually never work a full week of patrol. They will "work" overtime at a jail on one - or both - of their regular days off then comp off one or more of their regular patrol work days, and always in conjunction with their regular days off. Pardon me did I say work; work is a 4 letter word for these slugs. I should say they "show up at a jail and bloat a uniform" for time-and-a-half. When department seniority factors in for who gets to put in for time-off first, "tenured slugs" can simply monopolize all of the prime, time-off slots and of course all of the weekends.

    That leaves the slug's squad working short or with an overtime body who doesn't know the area well for purposes of doing their fair share of paperwork so as far as the squad's concerned that relief person might as well not even be there. As you know, the fall-out from this is more work and less time-off availability for the one's who choose and want to do their jobs responsibly.

    Professionally, how does one handle this? You can't not cover them. You can't ignore them when they need something. But, you don't have to eat with them, have coffee with them, or listen to them whine about being micro-managed on the two days a week they actually occupy a billet a useful person might have otherwise occupied in a patrol car alongside you.

    These people tend not to be productive and are invariably less than "standard employees." As to the slug's inappropriate acts or omissions in other matters of the job, the slug's got "nothing comin'" as far as expecting and enjoying "silence" from their peers. Since the slug's always taken advantage of his peers, as far as I'm concerned, you wouldn't be "ratting out" a fellow officer by letting someone who is in a position to investigate know where and when to be to "discover" the slug's misconduct as their supervisor.

    As I'm sure you know, supervisors can't take action against these folks for the stuff you mentioned, if it's just the slugs playing the system and operating just inside guidelines; but, if the squad members let the sergeant know "what else" is happening or "not happening" that should and shouldn't be happening, in areas outside these, (and with slugs there are always areas "outside these"), a good sergeant can and will do something about those things they learn or find are out of policy. Good luck with that...

    Leave a comment:


  • Ten10
    replied
    Geez...sounds familiar

    We have a person whom we've had the same issues with. Same deal, can't do anything about it. I need to stop talking about it, I'm going to work in an hour and my vein is already popping out of my forehead.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chiller
    replied
    Our Dept.


    Friday
    Monday
    Leave
    Act


    FMLA

    Leave a comment:


  • creolecop
    replied
    Originally posted by powerstroked View Post
    I am looking for some ideas to handle this on the shift level any input?
    Powerstroked, I feel your pain. Your right to be frustrated after seeing it over and over. I gather from your post though that your not a supervisor. If you see it and it's that obvious than the people that it matters to see it also. I would recommend just going to work and working like he's not even on the PD. If he's gone all the time you guys can't miss him when he doesn't show up. I wouldn't make a big deal about it because it doesn't really concern you. I know you guys have to pick up his slack when he's not there but other than maybe mentioning it one time to get it off your chest to the SGT I would drive on and just write him off as a terd and continue to do my job.

    Leave a comment:


  • FJDave
    replied
    Originally posted by SgtCHP View Post
    Not a new problem. It happens in every agency. Personally, I used to overlook their requests for specialized training, extra duty, etc. When they were left out of the loop, most came around. Evaluations were always fun when they were dinged for excessive use of sick leave. I used to maintain a list of averages for my troops and would use that as a yardstick for evaluations.

    I recall one troop who called in sick every other week on a regular basis. When shown the pattern he was establishing, he changed and became aware that others were taking notice. He requested a transfer and was gone within six months.

    It is one of the greatest difficulties for supervision and administration to cope with and it is a hardship on the troops that have to double up on beat assignments or workshifts to cover the missing. There are no firm answers to deal with the selfish without violating their employee rights.
    This is the way I deal with it. Look for patterns (calling in on a day in conjunction with RDOs, every Sunday, etc), deny day off or training requests with good cause, and the big one is mentioning it in the yearly eval. The eval is a permanent part of their record, so they don't want that in there.

    Leave a comment:


  • SgtCHP
    replied
    Not a new problem. It happens in every agency. Personally, I used to overlook their requests for specialized training, extra duty, etc. When they were left out of the loop, most came around. Evaluations were always fun when they were dinged for excessive use of sick leave. I used to maintain a list of averages for my troops and would use that as a yardstick for evaluations.

    I recall one troop who called in sick every other week on a regular basis. When shown the pattern he was establishing, he changed and became aware that others were taking notice. He requested a transfer and was gone within six months.

    It is one of the greatest difficulties for supervision and administration to cope with and it is a hardship on the troops that have to double up on beat assignments or workshifts to cover the missing. There are no firm answers to deal with the selfish without violating their employee rights.

    Leave a comment:


  • BPD_126
    replied
    We're having a huge problem with people calling in sick on either their mondays or fridays to extend their weekend. My grandma died on Feb. 28th, my wedding day, and her funeral was on the next thursday. I took thurs/friday off as a family sick day. I then had 1 1/2 week vacation to honeymoon (cruise). I've taken 1 sick day the last 2 1/2 years. My Cpt. walked by and complained to a Sgt., "Oh how convenient he's taking off both days before his honeymoon...." Sgt. replies, "Yeah, his grandma died." Cpt. didn't even feel bad for making the comment, just went, "Geez" and walked off.

    Look in the schedule book and you can consistently see people taking "S" days on their mondays and fridays but I'M the problem?!?!? Figure that one out.

    Leave a comment:


  • katseiye
    replied
    Originally posted by powerstroked View Post
    There is this person on my shift that is never at work! When the Sgt says "There is this training that is coming down the line who wants to go?" Guess who's hand shoots up first. And when they arnt at training they are playing the well i have family coming into town, I am sick, the kids are sick, and I think my dog will get ran over during the shift so i need to stay home and cry about it cards. I really don't see how this person can have anytime left on the books but they do. They have missed so much work they are clueless at calls. Know the feeling you get on that first call when you have been off for 2 weeks? They must not know what its like to NOT have that feeling.

    I am looking for some ideas to handle this on the shift level any input?
    Seems to me the Sgt may be part of the problem here. Did any one else want the training or is it assigned based on who's hand goes up first ?

    Mayhaps he really doesn't want the liability of a clueless guy on shift and gives him every opportunity not to have to deal with him till a shift change rolls around and now someone else has to deal with it.

    One of our biggest gripes are the fair hair crew that get their requests approved while those who remain vocal about lopsided treatment are consistently denied.

    Consider a diplomatic shift meeting with the Sgt and voice your concerns.

    Leave a comment:

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