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  • Retired96
    replied
    I have never heard of locking a patrol car on a traffic stop. What if the poop hits the fan. What if you suddenly need the shotgun or rifle in the car, you have to take the precious time to unlock the car. Your safety and that of your FTO is far more important than a big piece of metal.

    Do all the other officers lock their cars on traffic stops?

    Leave a comment:


  • just joe
    replied
    Sounds stupid to me, but do what you're told. When you get a regular FTO back, ask him/her about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • 10-31Mike
    replied
    Originally posted by tony.o View Post
    Heres the truth about FTO programs, at least where I work, most become FTOs for the extra pay. I wouldn't want to do it because I don't want to be doubled up all the time. That new FTO sounds like a clown.
    I second that.

    But around here it's not the pay (about $40 a month, don't spend it all in one place), it's to get a take home car.

    To the O.P. (and you probably already know this) just put up with it while you have to. There's so many reasons why he's wrong it's not worth the time to write them.

    The key to any law enforcement career is to get off probation. After that do what you think is right.

    Leave a comment:


  • tony.o
    replied
    Heres the truth about FTO programs, at least where I work, most become FTOs for the extra pay. I wouldn't want to do it because I don't want to be doubled up all the time. That new FTO sounds like a clown.

    Leave a comment:


  • StudChris
    replied
    Since it's for a couple weeks only I'd go with his way, and when you're off FTO and you have gained his respect then talk to him about it. I don't turn my car off (my lights would go off too, and I want my car radio on if I need it in a pinch), but I do lock my doors on most traffic stops.

    Leave a comment:


  • SOCALCOP
    replied
    I agree 100% with your thoughts and feelings. If your stay with this FTO is short then I would try and avoid the traffic stops and not cause waves. If you are with him for a few months then you can not avoid the traffic stops so I would have a serious chat with the FTO, your a trainee not a rookie, and outline your personal concerns why turning off the car and locking doors is bad, eg. it's used for cover, you have additional weapons inside you may need, if your HT battery dies you need the car radio, the list go's on and on. Of course you must always show the most respect possible and not ruffle his feathers. If all fails then have that unit key as ready as possible to unlock the car. Your life and safety is more important than his feelings, I am sure your family would agree.

    Leave a comment:


  • Name Taken
    replied
    The way the cars are wired where I am from with the car turned off you have no lights. Also if it hits the fan how do you get in the car quickly? I do not like the concept.

    With that being said...listern to the FTO as he's running the show for a few weeks. Hope if anything does go wrong that having 2 of everything on the site will negate any unsafe things.

    Leave a comment:


  • KAA951
    replied
    The FTO is always right...

    If you keep that attitude as a probationary deputy- you won't be at this Sheriff's Office long either!

    Word of advice- one that kept me out of trouble going through FTO as an experienced officer and one that I pass on to those I am training now.

    You don't have to like or agree with how I do things as an FTO- but while you ride in my car you will do this job my way. When you get out on your own, have some street experience and gain confidence in your job then you can develop your own style. Butting heads with your FTO will only get you written up and earn you a reputation for insubordination with your supervisors- remember, during FTO he is the boss!

    As to locking the patrol car during traffic stops- no, I don't do this as a practice, but I know other officers who do it religiously and respect their way of working. Their point on officer safety is valid, and I have locked my car on some stops while in areas were there are numerous people around.

    I remember one embarrasing traffic stop scenario in the academy when I walked up to talk to someone working under the hood of their car- and soon after my patrol car drove off without me... Lesson learned!

    Leave a comment:


  • SrgMagnum
    started a topic Officer Safety Question

    Officer Safety Question

    Quick bit of background...

    I recently moved from a large sheriff's department (about 2000 sworn) to a small sheriff's department (about 200 sworn). I'm going through another FTO program which I'm glad of since I only did about 6 months on patrol in my previous department. I'm about 2 months into the training and so far things are going very well. My first training officer and the others on the shift have all been great helping me transition from one agency to another with a very very different style.

    My new FTO, only a 2 week filler, is brand new. His first day back from FTO school was his first day with me as a trainee.

    We conducted a traffic stop and in the middle of the stop he walked behind me and stood in front of the violator's vehicle to observe my stop. This made me very uncomfortable for various reasons, not the least of which is the obvious safety hazard for both of us.

    While conducting records checks of the two people in the car over the radio, my FTO came back to my patrol car, turned it off, took the keys and locked the doors. I completed my stop and we continued our day.

    As we drove away he told me he wants me to turn off my car and lock it anytime I am out of it, including traffic stops. I was shocked because I was always trained to leave the car on and unlocked in order to keep it accessible.
    I told him I would do my best to try his method and was unable to feel comfortable with it because of the safety risk.

    The next day I brought it up to him and explained why I felt uncomfortable with his technique and respectfully told him I was uncomfortable doing it and asked for an explanation of why he wanted me to turn off and lock the car on stops. He explained he did not want our vehicle to get damaged on the stop. I explained that in my mind my safety was more important than the vehicle and that if my cover officer and I do our jobs properly nobody should get near our car during the stop.

    I was trained in both jail and on patrol by a very old school training program and group of FTO's. I take the trainee and trainer role very seriously and do not like to question my training officer but in this situation I saw it as a major safety risk and just could not feel comfortable with his method.

    I have never seen or heard of turning off the car and locking it during a traffic stop and I am concerned that this new FTO is going to teach unsafe practices to people who may not have even the limited patrol experience I have had prior to training with him.

    So I guess my questions are:

    -Is this a common practice anywhere else?

    -What are your thoughts on it?

    -Do you think I handled the situation appropriately?

    -Do you have recommendations about talking to a Sgt or somebody about this FTO to keep somebody from getting hurt?


    Thanks for your time.

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