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Have you ever gotten out of a ticket?

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  • Have you ever gotten out of a ticket?

    Im curious to how many CO's have gotten out of a ticket based on where they work. I had my first experience with that today. I never get pulled over but today I was pulled over by a local Sheriff deputy for not wearing a seat belt. The Deputy flashes her lights I pull over and wait for her in the window, I already know what I did because I thought about it when I saw her behind me. I always seem to forget to put on my seatbelt. So anyway the Deputy walks up and says, "Sir, I pulled you over for failure to wear a seatbelt". Then she asks for my proof of insurance and license. So I give it to her she starts walking back to the rear of my car and notices my Dept ID and a Corner of my badge behind some credit cards. (note I did not try to show it to her, ive always heard doing that is a slap in the face to the officer.) She then stops comes back and smiles at me and tells me I should know better and to put on a seatbelt. She then says I should run you license but I know it will come back clean, so she smiles again and tells me to have a nice day and gives me my items back. I was blown Away, I just knew I had a ticket. So seeing as this has NEVER happened to me before, granted I don't usually get pulled over, but it got me to wondering how many people have ever gotten a break. Share your thoughts.
    Line is ready. Shooters ready. Attention!

  • #2
    Professional Courtesy

    Hi,

    It's called professional courtesy and it's a wonderful fraternal thing as long as it's not abused. I try my best to always obey all the posted speed limits, laws, etc. but, as you know... stuff happens.

    Here in Suffolk County, 99% of all the law enforcement officers treat each other as just that, fellow law enforcement officers. If you have a valid shield and ID, you will most likely be afforded PC. Even our Aux. PO's are treated with PC here. I understand that it's not like that in other parts of the country or even other parts of the state, but it's fairly commonplace here. Just remember to be humble and polite and never disrespect the officer and he/she will likely be fine with you.

    Take care, God bless and be safe.

    -B
    NYC Dept. of Correction

    Comment


    • #3
      Yep, a few times. When I get pulled over I say "I'm sorry, I should have known better" and hand him my department ID under my license. Flashing the tin or acting like you are owed something will (and should) get you a ticket.
      Noise Check!

      Vic Mackey was my Training Officer

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Macquaid View Post
        (note I did not try to show it to her, ive always heard doing that is a slap in the face to the officer.)
        Actually, LEO's want to know this kind of stuff up front. One less potential, hazardous car stop they need to worry about, right?

        Next time you get stopped, and after the initial contact, the conversation should go something like this...

        ..."excuse me officer/deputy/troop, I'm a CO employed by (your agency) my ID is located (wherever) and I have no weapons in my vehicle" (if that's the case)

        That's it! Do not ask for PC, the rest is up to the LEO. The LEO will either ask for your ID, then cut you a break, ask for your ID, then cite you, or not ask for your ID, and cite you. But if you do it right, you have absolutely nothing to lose
        "Think like a man of action, act like a man of thought" ~Henri Louis Bergson
        ______________________


        ComptonPOLICEGANGS.com

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        • #5
          Originally posted by exComptonCop View Post
          Actually, LEO's want to know this kind of stuff up front. One less potential, hazardous car stop they need to worry about, right?

          Next time you get stopped, and after the initial contact, the conversation should go something like this...

          ..."excuse me officer/deputy/troop, I'm a CO employed by (your agency) my ID is located (wherever) and I have no weapons in my vehicle" (if that's the case)

          That's it! Do not ask for PC, the rest is up to the LEO. The LEO will either ask for your ID, then cut you a break, ask for your ID, then cite you, or not ask for your ID, and cite you. But if you do it right, you have absolutely nothing to lose
          Agreed! And please please please don't do this LAPD style wherein you wave your badge outside the car window while the officer is making their initial approach. They do realize every single passing motorist sees this and knows what is happening, right?

          EDJ
          "It's a game of cat and mouse. It's a game of hide and seek. Albeit games with deadly consequences. Like most games-the better you know the rules, the more likely you are to win."

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ElDiabloJoe View Post
            Agreed! And please please please don't do this LAPD style wherein you wave your badge outside the car window while the officer is making their initial approach. They do realize every single passing motorist sees this and knows what is happening, right?

            EDJ
            Ha! Too funny that you mention that because I just stopped an LAPD officer last week who did exactly that to me. And we were right on a busy street with people all watching curiously. I even heard someone say "oh he's gonna get out of it because he's a cop."

            So I told him I didn't think that was the best idea and that I'd have to go back and "run him etc" for a few minutes so people wouldn't think he was getting preferrential treatment. In my city, that sort of thing would make people call the W/C and complain.

            Let him go with a "have a good night" a few minutes later, but still...!!!

            So I'm not the only one who's experienced that?

            Comment


            • #7
              Recently I was pulled on my way to work because I had a headlight out. I was shocked because I had just replaced both headlights so my aging truck would pass the state inspection. I told the officer this, and he checked my inspection and informed me that it was EXPIRED! Turns out the garage had punched '07 instead of '08. I showed him the slip we get here that proved that the truck had passed inspection only 2 weeks ago. The officer advised me to change my headlight, and return to the garage to have the sticker fixed. Then he told me to have a safe day at work and sent me on my way.
              Was it because I was a Correctional Officer or obviously just the victim of some bad luck? I dunno. But I appreciate the officer not giving me a ticket.

              On the flip side of your question I am 90% certain I once received a ticket BECAUSE of where I work...seems troopers here have a real erection for writing C/O's. Honestly though, with some of the trash hired by the NC DOC its hard to blame them. (The DA dismissed the ticket when I showed it too him)
              Be sure you're right, then go ahead
              Davy Crockett

              Never pick a fight with an old man.
              If he's too old to fight, he'll just kill you
              .


              PM me if you wanna swap patches.

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              • #8
                The town our facility is in has a hardon for writing COs. Or so I hear.

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                • #9
                  I have been offered proffesional courtesy twice. (Incidently, thats all I have pulled over in the twelve years on the tiers.) I told the officer I was armed when he approached. He asked me why, then I was able to shown my ID without "flashing" the badge. Both of them told me to slow down and sent me on my way.

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                  • #10
                    Here in my neck of the woods local, county and most Highway Patrol officers tend to be very professionaly courtious. We have had a few that have pushed it and when we as supervisors found out about it, we told them to stroke them a hard copy the next time they caught them. You should take the breaks given you, and you certainly do not abuse them.
                    One day I took off early and was pulled over by a DPS Trooper that I have now known for years and is now a Texas Ranger. At this time I had only known him for about a year, from him bringing in people to the jail. As he approached my truck I lowered my window about two inches and said, "Hey, I'm working under cover as a speeder." He started laughing and said, "I thought you guys didn't get off till 6 pm." I told him that I was on my home home for a crawfish boil, or something and he sent me on my way with a smile.
                    Not everyone's experiences are that pleasant, but we tend to have a good working relationship with the street officers around here.
                    In return, they know that when they have a combative on they way to the jail, all they have to do is give us a five minute heads up. They pull in and we handle everything for them from there.
                    Road Captain
                    Blue Knights TX XIX

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                    • #11
                      I've gotten pulled over once since being a CO, coming home from work. I was in uniform, didn't ask him for a break, but was police and respectful and let him know I was armed. I got a written warning, which was good enough for me! Interestingly enough, it was from AZ DPS, which is NOTORIOUS for writing COs, and sometimes even other cops.
                      1*

                      Ten dash eight!

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                      • #12
                        u

                        When I worked in NC and had a real wallet badge I got out of getting a ticket a couple of times. In the feds we do not have a badge of any kind and we do not get issued legit credentials until after we have been OTJ for 5 years. (what ever happened to the dhs mandate?) I had a fake ID when I was 17 that looked more legit than what the bop issued me when I started!! They say it gives us something to look forward to???? I say its just one of many reasons to go to another federal agency. (sorry for the rant)

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SHU View Post
                          When I worked in NC and had a real wallet badge I got out of getting a ticket a couple of times. In the feds we do not have a badge of any kind and we do not get issued legit credentials until after we have been OTJ for 5 years. (what ever happened to the dhs mandate?) I had a fake ID when I was 17 that looked more legit than what the bop issued me when I started!! They say it gives us something to look forward to???? I say its just one of many reasons to go to another federal agency. (sorry for the rant)

                          Don't let someone fool you SHU concerning credentials. The ID card that you have is just as legitimate as those larger cards we call credentials, and affords the same powers as per Title 18 USC Sec. 3050, as well as other regs. Keep the card that you do have carefully placed with your drivers license, or get a wallet that has room for the card and drivers license to be visible at the same time, which is available through most law enforcement supply businesses. I have seen FBI here who have come to get the keys to our range in Leavenworth, and nine times out of ten, they won't have their badge with them unless they are armed on duty in the Kansas City area, (at least the few times I have talked with them). Yes, they are armed off duty.

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                          • #14
                            I have yet to be pulled over since being a CO/Deputy Sheriff. But I plan on simply saying the following when they come to the window.. "Good ______, officer, please be advised I am carrying my off/on duty weapon, I have my department's credentials in my side pocket."

                            As a courtesy to them.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rolt View Post
                              I have yet to be pulled over since being a CO/Deputy Sheriff. But I plan on simply saying the following when they come to the window.. "Good ______, officer, please be advised I am carrying my off/on duty weapon, I have my department's credentials in my side pocket."

                              As a courtesy to them.
                              Which I am sure is the right way to establish your professional cred. I don't work the street, but I am sure I would be annoyed if someone that I pulled over for commiting an infraction started flashing ID and asking what MY problem was!

                              Comment

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