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Which is Your Handcuffing Hand?

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  • #16
    I'm a "righty," and I handcuff right handed.

    Originally, it didn't matter to me until I got some hinged cuffs and saw how easy it would be to use them as a takedown tool over the chained cuffs. I couldn't really do the takedowns left handed.

    Mostly, I use the right hand because my cuff pouch is on the right side behind my gun. I don't carry a lot of junk on my belt and nothing behind me.

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    • #17
      I'm left handed but shoot right handed, in most things I'm ambidexterous. I use hinged cuffs on any resistive or combative suspects and have had no trouble performing take downs using either hand. I carry my hinged cuffs behind my weapon and chain cuffs on the opposite side. As long as you've got a grip on the hinged cuff and jerk the suspects arm up at an angle quickly applying leverage to their straightened out elbow they'll go down everytime in my experience. I may have one in the future that doesn't as Mr. murphy is always lurking around somewhere, but as of yet, I haven't had any problems using this technique.

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      • #18
        Our Academy teaches to use what every hand is free... they also teach behind the back thumbs up, cursory search. We would do drills where we would have to search the suspect, and the instructor would yell cuff, and we would do a quick cuff with whatever hand was free at the time. If we swtiched hands we'd have to do pushups. I keep a pair of cuffs on each side of my belt.
        - John 15:13 -

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        • #19
          Originally posted by TacticalMD View Post
          So there seems to be some inconsistency in my academy as to which hand (strong/gun or weak) should be used to hold the cuffs while the other holds the suspect.
          They both present pros:
          Gun hand: Can easily drop the cuffs and push away the suspect with weak hand while un-holstering with gun hand.
          Weak hand: Strong hand can hold the suspect better (ex. a wrist lock, etc.) due to strength.

          So what hand do you use to place the cuffs on?

          Thanks!
          My answer is you need to have control of your suspect before even putting the cuffs on, whether they are standing or prone. If your right hand has the suspect under control, you use your left hand to cuff the subject, and vice versa. If the suspect gets antsy, you appy pain-compliance with the hand in control. Every situation is different, and you may end up getting the suspect under control with your right hand or your left hand.
          As for control and pain compliance moves, do what you have been taught in academy (for liability reasons, I'm not going to tell you what to do).

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          • #20
            I tend to use my strong/gun hand. For some strange reason I get a better grip with my weak hand.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by TacticalMD View Post
              So there seems to be some inconsistency in my academy as to which hand (strong/gun or weak) should be used to hold the cuffs while the other holds the suspect.
              They both present pros:
              Gun hand: Can easily drop the cuffs and push away the suspect with weak hand while un-holstering with gun hand.
              Weak hand: Strong hand can hold the suspect better (ex. a wrist lock, etc.) due to strength.

              So what hand do you use to place the cuffs on?

              Thanks!
              What do you think? If you have a suspect "restrained" and you are attempting to cuff him and you have to revert to deadly force, it is a proven fact that when you have something in your hand, in a situation of panic, you will not let go of that something. It is a reflex. Good luck getting your sidearm out while you have a pair of cuffs in your gun hand. Always hold with your strong/gun hand and cuff with your weak hand. It's a no-brainer. Just like when you approach any car or person, traffic stop or F/I, never have anything in your gun hand, just in case. It just slows you down, and speeds up the inevitable. Your death. Ask your instructor to straighten you out and let him know about the inconsistency of his teaching, just don't **** him off.

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