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  • New Deputy looking for advice

    I was recently hired with my local Sheriffs Office and i’m going to be starting in the jail. I have goals to move to the road once i’ve done my time and proved myself competent as a deputy. I am excited to start and I want to excel quickly. I understand the importance of learning the job first. I’m only asking for reference through my growth as a Deputy.

    What can I do to make myself stand out as a new deputy in order to get the edge on others seeking higher positions? I was told to take all optional classes/training that become available. I was also told to volunteer for OT shifts. Are there any certifications I can attain to make my future applications look favorable? How can I get involved more in my department? Thank you ahead of time for any advice. I look forward to growing with the blue family.

  • #2
    Personally, you should just keep your head low and pass probation. I wouldn't geek out just yet. The first year is crucial. You have 30 years to be a superstar so just be a sponge for now.
    Policebackground.net - Background investigation consulting & forums
    http://www.policebackground.net

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    • #3
      Don't get any of the inmates pregnant

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      • #4
        Originally posted by LA_Backgrounds View Post
        Personally, you should just keep your head low and pass probation. I wouldn't geek out just yet. The first year is crucial. You have 30 years to be a superstar so just be a sponge for now.
        The voice of wisdom...

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        • #5
          I agree with keeping your head low and passing probation. Don’t run when you should be learning to crawl, the opportunities you seek will present themselves.

          You don’t even know how you’ll handle the custody environment yet so just learn all you can and ask questions, no one is impressed with the newbies.

          When I first started in the jail it was with a group of 8, I eventually stood out through work ethic and initiative. The ones doing all the big talking and brown nosing made different names for themselves, just learn!

          Best of luck!

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          • #6
            The best thing you can remember in your training time is there is a reason you have 2 eyes, 2 ears and only one mouth.

            Look and listen to your trainers twice as much as you talk .

            After watching and listening for a few months....find one or more individuals in the department that you like the way they work. Get professionally close to them and observe them closely. See if they will mentor you a bit.

            Watch the way people do things. You will see some things that work and some that don't. Practice the ones that work and avoid things that don't. You will find the EVERYONE does things a bit differently & you need to developed a style that works for you effectively

            Be a sponge................but know what to absorb and what to reject
            Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

            My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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            • #7
              Being in the jails is crucial for you to practice and truly hone the following things:

              1. Your searches... Yes they are in black and whites and/or oranges or whatever color your organization puts them in.. Less places than a methhead has to hide things but treat EVERY SINGLE PERSON SEARCH as if your life depends on it... If you develop that habit and mentality now you will be a rock star in searches of people, vehicles and places as opposed to those who just let things slide or assume something might not be somewhere.
              2. TALKING TO PEOPLE.. Yes you learn how to talk to the criminal element far more than those who don't get to work custody positions first.. Use this to your advantage.. But also know when to turn it off and talk to an inmate as a normal person when you can.
              3. Inmates represent only the negative aspect of society and our lines of work.. Don't forget that when you take your first call of mom and dad can't find their kid hiding under the bathroom sink and think that lil 5 year old Susie ran away. Know your audience at all times.
              4. As someone else said.. Don't get the inmate(s) pregnant...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BlueLinerAZ View Post
                1. Your searches... Yes they are in black and whites and/or oranges or whatever color your organization puts them in.. Less places than a methhead has to hide things but treat EVERY SINGLE PERSON SEARCH as if your life depends on it...
                ...because it does.

                And I am appalled at the actual performance of most new officers when it comes to searching.

                I have at times stripped down to my trousers and undershirt at the station, and challenged new recruits to search me. These are recruits who have just been trained on how to search. To date, almost none of them have found the full-sized Glock (unloaded) that I had shoved down the front of my trousers beforehand.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Aidokea View Post

                  ...because it does.

                  And I am appalled at the actual performance of most new officers when it comes to searching.

                  I have at times stripped down to my trousers and undershirt at the station, and challenged new recruits to search me. These are recruits who have just been trained on how to search. To date, almost none of them have found the full-sized Glock (unloaded) that I had shoved down the front of my trousers beforehand.
                  That and the tatas on the ladies... Everyone gets all hinky about "oh no I have to touch her bewbies!!!!" and that becomes the quickest most craptastic knife hand search I've ever seen and yet an amazing place I've found the following things:

                  1. Cuff keys
                  2. small knife
                  3. syringes
                  4. drugs, drugs and drugs
                  5. a small .38

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                  • Aidokea
                    Aidokea commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Yup. I don't go through the above exercise because I enjoy being fondled by recruits, but they need to understand the seriousness of what we do, and the potential consequences of getting it wrong even once. You should see the look on their face when I pull a full-sized Glock out of my pants after they search me.

                    And in that moment, they find themselves in a teachable state. I don't demean them for failing to find it, I just use that opportunity to counsel them. I tell them that when they search a male, they don't need to be able to tell me whether the subject is circumcised or not, but their search should be in that general zip-code of thoroughness.

                    Then I have them look up the story of Bret and Rene Clodfelter. Bret was a 34 year old Oregon State Patrol Trooper, with 8 years on the job. On 09/30/92, he stopped a carload of drunk illegal aliens, and arrested the operator for DUI. The two passengers were also drunk, so Bret offered to give them a ride home. When he searched the other two, he missed a loaded .38 revolver, a mistake that cost Bret his life. But this tragedy had further repercussions- for starters, it left his 11 year old daughter and 9 year old son without a father. At the time of his death Bret had been married only 33 days. His new bride, Rene Clodfelter, was also a sworn peace officer. Rene was unable to cope with Bret's murder, and on the first anniversary of his murder, she took her own life. I attended Bret's funeral, and it made a real impression upon me regarding the importance of doing a good job when searching a subject. When Rene killed herself a year later, it drove that point home with me even further.
                    Last edited by Aidokea; 07-29-2019, 03:47 PM.

                • #10
                  Some good advice here. But....

                  Depending on the sheriff, where you are in GA and who you are, may depend more on how quickly you get on the road.

                  Not trying to be negative or discourage you. Just pointing out reality.

                  Iowa has some good and politically safe advice to follow.

                  Good luck!

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                  • #11
                    There has been a trend over recent decades for starting new hires in the detention setting first. This provides very close observation and supervision, and potential problem employees are usually weeded out before allowing them to transition to the less structured environment of road duty.

                    By all means, take any and all additional training opportunities that come up.

                    One area that makes a young officer stand out is clear, concise, accurate, and objective reports. Another thing that brings favor on young officers is being self-critical; if you screw up, or if a situation could have been handled better, your supervisors should hear about it from you first (not from a formal complaint, or from a news report).

                    One thing I mention to all young officers and aspiring applicants is to get a second language. Fluency in a second language will make you a valuable asset to any department. Check your local community colleges and universities for the availability of language courses, preferably in languages frequently encountered in your area (Spanish has been the biggest demand in recent years, so I would work on that before studying Mandarin Chinese or Hebrew).

                    Good luck.

                    Comment

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