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  • #16
    What did all of you do while you were waiting, did you tell your employer that you planned on leaving?

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    • #17
      Re: Experience getting hired

      My application process lasted about three months. The last couple weeks were the longest of my life. If there's one piece of advice I'd give, it would be to disclose everything in your application. My department looked into every single facet of my life, past and present. I'm an immigrant to Canada, lived almost my whole life in the Caribbean, I was also a LEO down there, mistakenly thought that some things wouldn't be relevant or wouldn't be found out. I was wrong. The last couple weeks I must have gotten at least a half dozen calls from my recruiter, who seemed frustrated over my little issues in the past. He's a good guy though and realized how badly I wanted to get back in the saddle, so to speak, he helped me out big time. At our police college I saw guys go through weeks of training, only to have them pulled out of the classroom cause something came up in their background checks.
      Another thing is, don't give away your hand to early on your present job, I felt a certain amount of loyalty to the company I was working with and gave them a month's notice. Soon as I did that management's attitude changed dramatically, I got transferred immediately and got **** assignments for the entire month.
      Ibtrini

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      • #18
        It took the better part of a year and I was hired on my first try. I applied with five agencies in about the same time frame, got hired by the one that I preferred, and left it at that. I was only dropped from one process.

        It's a lot of waiting and a lot of uncertainty. If I didn't get hired by any of the agencies I applied for I would have temporarily given up, as I couldn't stay in the job I was in with no health insurance for the kid or wife. I would have accepted a contract in Kuwait and went back overseas for another year, and then tried again.
        I miss you, Dave.
        http://www.odmp.org/officer/20669-of...david-s.-moore

        Comment


        • #19
          The waiting game is the worse. I was in the hiring process for 11 months. Most of the time was just waiting to get a phone call or a piece of mail. Also, the psych test was worst for me. Think about what your going to say before you say it, and take your time responding when you have the personal interview with the psychiatrist.

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          • #20
            I've been hired by the Nebraska State Patrol after 2 years of applying. This is the first agency i have applied with so I feel fortunate. A few things I have learned:

            Be precise in everything. Exact dates, exact names, exact phone numbers, exact appearance at the interviews, exact answers to questions. Everything must be precise to get the best standing.

            Get your affairs in order. If you owe someone money (ie, the $20 you borrowed but haven't gotten paid back) get it taken care of. If you have ever pirated music or software on your computer either delete it or buy legit copies. If you have ANYTHING unfinished, undone, unresolved, or undealt-with things in your past get them squared away immediately.

            Appearance is a big deal. Always be in a suit and tie unless told otherwise. If you can spit shine your shoes, do it. The one time I did I got a lot of compliments from the review board. When you can look down and see your reflection you are good to go.

            At the interviews make your answers concise and to the point. My interviews were always half the time of everyone else's because I gave short pointed answers that answered the question in as short a time as possible but still got my point across. Brevity is better than long narratives.

            Be honest and truthful always. If you screwed up and that DQ's you, so be it. Learn from it and try again. Good luck!!!
            sigpic
            NSP Class 52

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            • #21
              Not many; or any that I can think of, got hired on the first try. Normally there has to be that fit, and no one can say that one department you apply for will hire you. I was lucky to get my top choice and everything worked out great. But during the 4-5 months it took for testing for other places and getting through the academy, I just had to get my name out and keep on trying. Many places just flat turned my application down, other let me get through everythhing but the conditional (psych and med) and turned me away for others. And then I had the department that gave me a conditional. It took time and some hard work with lots of waiting.
              TheDesire
              Desire. Dedication. Dicipline.

              Comment


              • #22
                Having been in LE for quite some time, here's my advice. I have been on hiring boards and have sat there with a Chief or Sheriff and discussed hiring someone.

                Not in any sense of order, just some random thoughts.

                1. Research, research, research the agencies you are applying with. Check the website, talk to Officers that work there, explore the town/county as best you can. I say this because when you get interviewed, most agencies want to know if you know anything about them or the area. If you give them the deer in the headlights look and then try to BS something, they will see through you.

                2. When you interview, dress the part. LE is a very conservative (for the most part). When you show up, wear a nice, pressed dark colored suit with matching tie, shirt, belt, and polished shoes. Check yourself out before you go inside or at least find a head and make sure you are squared away before you report. Wearing a dark suit with a pink tie isn't going to win them over.

                3. Dress in a suit everytime you show up for something unless told not to. Better to be overdressed than underdressed. First impressions are lasting ones. You show up for something in jeans and a polo and everyone else is in slacks, shirt, tie combo, you will be remembered.

                4. Make sure you are accurate in everything you fill out. Nothing like calling a number for a reference and it being out of order or the person that answers doesn't know what's going on (because you forgot to tell them) or they don't know you (new residents at an old number).

                5. If you have issues in your background, tell your investigator. He/She will find out anyway and you will get blackballed for being a liar. If you have crappy credit, been in trouble before, or have smoked a little MJ 5-10 years ago, let them know. We will find out.

                6. When it's time to go to the academy, be squared away. Be up on your PT, have your family life in order, make sure you have a way to/from the academy if it's not a live-in one, and make sure all your bills are paid up.

                7. Be patient. Some agencies have full-time folks doing backgrounds while others are doing all sort of other stuff plus backgrounds. If you call 10 times a week asking about your status, they are going to remember you.

                8. All agencies are different. That's why I go insane when I see folks wanting to apply for USCP, USSS-UD, FBI Police, NCIS, FBI, DEA, ATF, ICE, FAMs, etc.....all at the same time. Yes, shotgun method works well but all are different agencies and all have different missions. That's the same for PDs and Sheriff's Office. Some areas have County Police while others have SOs covering things out in the unincorporated areas. Make sure you know the differences. Back to the reseach thing. Know what your getting yourself into so an agency doesn't spend a ton of money on background, security clearances, your academy, FTO, etc...... and then you turn around and quit because you're not happy. Think of the poor smuck that wanted the job because he did the research and felt the job was right for him/her and they didn't get it because you beat them out.

                9. When you interview, talk directly to the folks, don't look down, and don't ramble on and on.

                10. When waiting for an interview or some part of the process and you are standing around, be professional. Someone may have a video system camera on you to see how you are acting. Playing grab *** with a friend or trying to catch a nap when everyone is standing around awaiting instructions isn't something you should be doing.

                11. Make sure you are on time. I always tell folks at least 15-20 mins before you are supposed to be there. Allow for traffic and/or mass commute stuff. Nothing like showing up and having the interviewers awaiting you. If you are going to be late, call. Nothing like sitting around wondering if the person is going to show, then having to listen to some BS answer (even if it's the truth) when a phone call could have made all the difference.

                12. When you are in the academy, don't be "that guy." Show up on-time, ready to go, and ready to learn everyday. It will get back to your agency if you are the class clown, the tardy person, the one fading off during class, the one not doing well on test, or the always running late with some BS excuse person. In my academy we had one that for the rest of his life will be known as "Crayon Boy" and other one that was called "Work-around." The nicknames followed and so will the reputation.

                13. While at the academy give 110% everyday no matter how boring a subject might be. Don't fallout of runs, always study for tests, and don't be the "When I was in the Army/Navy/AF/Marines/Coast Guard/last agency this is how we did things.

                14. When you get out of the academy and are in FTO, keep your mouth shut and your eyes open. Listen to what your FTO says. He/She will make or break your LE career. If you have issues with them, deal with it till your FTO period is over. Arguing with them or being an *** with them is going to get you let go. Don't tell him/her, "This is what we were taught in the academy." That's not going to help you either. If you are truly having issues with your FTO, use your chain of command to try and work them out. If you jump from your FTO to a LT or CPT and don't go through the SGT, your crap will be weak.

                15. Once you get out on your own, listen to the guys/gals on your shift that have been there. They are your back-up and you theirs. Ask their advice and for help if you need it. Don't try to forgo it and jack things up to the point a supervisor has to get involved.

                That's just my rambling worth. I am sure others can add more.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Good topic, i learned a good bit from it.
                  Sincerely,
                  Justice71

                  "Chance favors the prepared mind"

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by ignignokt373 View Post
                    Having been in LE for quite some time, here's my advice. I have been on hiring boards and have sat there with a Chief or Sheriff and discussed hiring someone.

                    Not in any sense of order, just some random thoughts.

                    1. Research, research, research the agencies you are applying with. Check the website, talk to Officers that work there, explore the town/county as best you can. I say this because when you get interviewed, most agencies want to know if you know anything about them or the area. If you give them the deer in the headlights look and then try to BS something, they will see through you.

                    2. When you interview, dress the part. LE is a very conservative (for the most part). When you show up, wear a nice, pressed dark colored suit with matching tie, shirt, belt, and polished shoes. Check yourself out before you go inside or at least find a head and make sure you are squared away before you report. Wearing a dark suit with a pink tie isn't going to win them over.

                    3. Dress in a suit everytime you show up for something unless told not to. Better to be overdressed than underdressed. First impressions are lasting ones. You show up for something in jeans and a polo and everyone else is in slacks, shirt, tie combo, you will be remembered.

                    4. Make sure you are accurate in everything you fill out. Nothing like calling a number for a reference and it being out of order or the person that answers doesn't know what's going on (because you forgot to tell them) or they don't know you (new residents at an old number).

                    5. If you have issues in your background, tell your investigator. He/She will find out anyway and you will get blackballed for being a liar. If you have crappy credit, been in trouble before, or have smoked a little MJ 5-10 years ago, let them know. We will find out.

                    6. When it's time to go to the academy, be squared away. Be up on your PT, have your family life in order, make sure you have a way to/from the academy if it's not a live-in one, and make sure all your bills are paid up.

                    7. Be patient. Some agencies have full-time folks doing backgrounds while others are doing all sort of other stuff plus backgrounds. If you call 10 times a week asking about your status, they are going to remember you.

                    8. All agencies are different. That's why I go insane when I see folks wanting to apply for USCP, USSS-UD, FBI Police, NCIS, FBI, DEA, ATF, ICE, FAMs, etc.....all at the same time. Yes, shotgun method works well but all are different agencies and all have different missions. That's the same for PDs and Sheriff's Office. Some areas have County Police while others have SOs covering things out in the unincorporated areas. Make sure you know the differences. Back to the reseach thing. Know what your getting yourself into so an agency doesn't spend a ton of money on background, security clearances, your academy, FTO, etc...... and then you turn around and quit because you're not happy. Think of the poor smuck that wanted the job because he did the research and felt the job was right for him/her and they didn't get it because you beat them out.

                    9. When you interview, talk directly to the folks, don't look down, and don't ramble on and on.

                    10. When waiting for an interview or some part of the process and you are standing around, be professional. Someone may have a video system camera on you to see how you are acting. Playing grab *** with a friend or trying to catch a nap when everyone is standing around awaiting instructions isn't something you should be doing.

                    11. Make sure you are on time. I always tell folks at least 15-20 mins before you are supposed to be there. Allow for traffic and/or mass commute stuff. Nothing like showing up and having the interviewers awaiting you. If you are going to be late, call. Nothing like sitting around wondering if the person is going to show, then having to listen to some BS answer (even if it's the truth) when a phone call could have made all the difference.

                    12. When you are in the academy, don't be "that guy." Show up on-time, ready to go, and ready to learn everyday. It will get back to your agency if you are the class clown, the tardy person, the one fading off during class, the one not doing well on test, or the always running late with some BS excuse person. In my academy we had one that for the rest of his life will be known as "Crayon Boy" and other one that was called "Work-around." The nicknames followed and so will the reputation.

                    13. While at the academy give 110% everyday no matter how boring a subject might be. Don't fallout of runs, always study for tests, and don't be the "When I was in the Army/Navy/AF/Marines/Coast Guard/last agency this is how we did things.

                    14. When you get out of the academy and are in FTO, keep your mouth shut and your eyes open. Listen to what your FTO says. He/She will make or break your LE career. If you have issues with them, deal with it till your FTO period is over. Arguing with them or being an *** with them is going to get you let go. Don't tell him/her, "This is what we were taught in the academy." That's not going to help you either. If you are truly having issues with your FTO, use your chain of command to try and work them out. If you jump from your FTO to a LT or CPT and don't go through the SGT, your crap will be weak.

                    15. Once you get out on your own, listen to the guys/gals on your shift that have been there. They are your back-up and you theirs. Ask their advice and for help if you need it. Don't try to forgo it and jack things up to the point a supervisor has to get involved.

                    That's just my rambling worth. I am sure others can add more.
                    Great Advice!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I applied to a couple departments. I went pretty far with all the depts but I got my hired with my dream departments first. The whole process took about a year if you include all the departments I applied to.

                      Comment

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