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when you can't practice shooting

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  • when you can't practice shooting

    what do you do?

    Ranges are restricted to use when the Firearms instructor is there.

    Firearms ordinances prohibit shooting at home or in the old sand pits.

    I can dry fire, (though it creates some bad habits.) I can practice drawing & reloading.

    But it's the actual SHOOTING...

  • #2
    In the police academy they had us dry fire with a coin on the front site without dropping it for about 3 days before we even went to the range to shoot live rounds.
    John D. MacDonald, "The early bird who catches the worm works for someone who comes in late and owns the worm farm."

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    • #3
      I agree that you need to shoot. But if you can't then dry firing is pretty darn close.

      What are the "bad habits" caused by dry firing?
      Cogito ergo summopere periculosus.

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      • #4
        What are the "bad habits" caused by dry firing
        racking after every 'shot.'

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        • #5
          Originally posted by goober
          racking after every 'shot.'
          So don't wrack the slide. Just practice trigger squeeze and sight alignment.

          Believe me we feel your pain. I don't know of any officer that can get out to the range as much as they like. Even the gun nuts "Man, I can only go the range every otherday."

          IMO practicing drawing out of the holster is as important, if not more so, than firing the weapon. Practice falling into that good position right out of the holster until it's second nature.

          Now practice from downed positions, on your back, side, stomach. Draw, clear malfunction, reload. Then do this all with ONLY your off-hand.

          Trust me, there's plenty to practice without going to range.
          You have no right to not be offended.-Neal Boortz

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          • #6
            I couldn't agree more with Centurion. Everything said above is good practice. When I instructed in the Marine Corps, I would have pistol shooters dry fire while concentrating on trigger squeeze and sight alignment.
            Yes that's how my target looks when I'm done with it...

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            • #7
              I would guess he has a Glock and that's why he needs to rack the slide.
              Cogito ergo summopere periculosus.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by mobrien316
                I would guess he has a Glock and that's why he needs to rack the slide.
                Good point...
                Yes that's how my target looks when I'm done with it...

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                • #9
                  Don't you have any public ranges in the area? Gun clubs, etc... Jin one of those and shoot there (tax write off). But as the others have said dry firing is the best you can do in leu of actual shooting. The important part of "dry fire" is not the "click" of the hammer. it's the sight alignment, smooth pull, the draw from the holster, the muscle memory. The "click" is just the cool sound at the end.

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                  • #10
                    CarCop: My point exactly. Don't develop bad habits out of a need to hear a gun click.
                    You have no right to not be offended.-Neal Boortz

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                    • #11
                      I have a membership at my local indoor gunrange and shoot weekly.

                      I shoot at least 100 rounds of my 9mm, 14 rounds of 00-buck (shotty holds 6+1) and at least 2 mags (60 rounds) from my AR-15.

                      Proficiency with your firearm/s will save the life of someone, or more likely yourself so you can go home to your family. The money you spend on training yourself/keeping proficient is worth any amount in the long run.

                      -Stay safe and make it a weekly/monthly 'thing' you do for yourself.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CarCop
                        ...Don't you have any public ranges in the area?...

                        Yup, when you can't get to the department's range on your own time, go to a public one.
                        Officer Down Memorial Page

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                        • #13
                          boy, I've been in the area for about 15 years and don't know of any public ranges, but I'll sure ask the FI when I see him on Monday.

                          it is a Glock, hence the racking for dry firing.

                          Thanks for the ideas so far. I knew I couldn't be alone! Excellent points Centurion about practicing drawing from all different positions/situations. I teach Officer Safety for Communicators, and I use the Kehoe brothers shooting training tape. The Trooper not being able to get his gun out because of the way the retention holster worked (or, er... didn't work) while he was moving backwards always sticks in my mind.

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                          • #14
                            No problem. We "po'-leese" cuz we Po' and the make the leas' amount of money.

                            Another think I thought about to day from ol' Ofc. survival is if you take your car home (or maybe after shift one night if not) clear your weapon safely and practice drawing, clearing, reloading, etc while seated in your patrol car (with seat belt on, of course). If you haven't been formally trained on how to do so see if you can get someone who's qualified at your dept to show you or take the class and then practice, practice, practice.
                            You have no right to not be offended.-Neal Boortz

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                            • #15
                              Excellent points from all.

                              My concern over having to cycle your guns action after every shot is pretty low. Making presentations part of your dryfire is good idea, especially from different positions and from inside your vehicle/seated position.

                              When you are first starting the coin behind the front site is a good tool to see if you are jerking trigger, but can be abandoned after you sync in good skills. But, remember that dryfire is training, and training is serious business. If you are going to half-*** it then don't do it at all (not that I think you are). Perfect practice make perfect.

                              My department give 250 rounds a month to anyone who comes to the range, and you would be surprised how many people (most) don't take advantage of this. You have passed the first hurdle in knowing that practice is necessary.

                              Good Luck, and remember, "If you ain't cheatin', you ain't winning. There is no FAIR in the middle of the fight."
                              "A fanatic is one who won't change his mind, and won't change the subject." -Winston Churchill

                              "I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts." -Will Rogers

                              "To desire to save these wolves in society may arise from benevolence, but it must be the benevolence of a child or a fool" -Henry Fielding

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