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  • Question about behavior

    I was recently told by another officer that a some of the officers said that I was too timid. I have only been working with the department for three weeks. I do not see how they could come to this conclusion so fast as i am still in a non-sworn position until the paperwork comes back and i am not allowed out of the patrol car until i am sworn. I am the type of person that i don't talk a lot unless i have something important to say i don't know if this is where they are thinking i am timid. I was just wondering if any of you had any suggestions to help me with this issue.

  • #2
    when i first started with my job everyone said the opposite about me. Coming from an IA position in the prison, i wanted to find lots of dope (I'm a parole officer now) so I have been very very proactive. apparently all the people i worked with said I was too excited to get out of the office and into the streets. I paid them no mind.
    You'll become the police officer you will retire as based on experiences, and no one can make you "change" to be the Officer they think you are. For example, being too timid allows you to observe situations more carefully and plan your next moves before adrenaline kicks in in certain situations. So, think of it in a positive way.

    besides that, you're new, they're going to tear your every little move apart. It's what happens in any new job, especially police/law enforcement work.

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    • #3
      When I started out I was told that I needed to say more. This was probably my first two or three weeks in field training by the way, and that phase was conducted prior to attending the academy. I thought it was an odd statement to make to a new officer in that position since I hadn't undertaken any training other than basic firearms qualifications and a skeleton use of force "talk." How can one speak to reporting parties about the different degrees of battery, warrant procedures, report retrieval, victim's assistance and so forth if no instruction has ever been given. Eventually, I virtually memorized a field guide put out by our state attorney general which for the most part seemed to make people think I had already been through training, and the whole "speak up" thing ceased.


      It may be uncomfortable for you, but you probably should learn to speak up more, be more assertive, and so forth. Body posture, voice inflection, eye movements, and other matters that scream self-confidence. Your interactions with other cops is likely where this timid "thing" has spawned. Watch Gran Torino and notice how Clint Eastwood's character tries to teach the neighbor boy how to speak up, etc. I'm sure you're bright enough to get where I'm going there.

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      • #4
        I have a 6'3'' 200lb friend who is quiet as a church mouse. Myself, a 5'9'' 150lb guy tends to talk too much. They best advice I have been given, and give, is to talk with your body more, and less with your mouth. Your non-verbal communication is interpreted far more often then your words. So you may be the "quiet timid guy" but turn yourself into the "quiet timid guy that carries a big stick."

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        • #5
          Originally posted by RenoR1 View Post
          I have a 6'3'' 200lb friend who is quiet as a church mouse. Myself, a 5'9'' 150lb guy tends to talk too much. They best advice I have been given, and give, is to talk with your body more, and less with your mouth. Your non-verbal communication is interpreted far more often then your words. So you may be the "quiet timid guy" but turn yourself into the "quiet timid guy that carries a big stick."
          Yup. It's all about body language. Do you divert your eyes during conversation? Do you sloutch? Do you keep your hands in your pockets? Do you speak queitly and unsure of yourself? The answer should be no to all of these.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Michigan View Post
            Yup. It's all about body language. Do you divert your eyes during conversation? Do you sloutch? Do you keep your hands in your pockets? Do you speak queitly and unsure of yourself? The answer should be no to all of these.
            This is certainly true, cops are experts at reading peoples faces. They do it for a living. The bottom line is you need to have a poker face. Saying too much is definetly not a good thing either, but you must carry yourself in a positive way. When some big old senior hump face gets in your face then you have to look back at him and imagine that your talking to a harmless 10 year old. I think keeping it short is still the way to go , but just have a more positive delivery when you do say something and carry yourself like you have a set. If you don't, your coworkers will be the least of your problems because steet people are even better with their animal instincts at reading fear.

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            • #7
              the first time you have to kick the crap out of someone on the street that should be the end of it.


              dont let your professionalism and your courtesy been seen as a sign of weakness.
              In the end we're all just chalk lines on the concrete drawn only to be washed away, for the time that I've been given, I am what I am. I'd rather you hate me for everything I am, Than have you love me for being something that Im not

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