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  • marshaldan
    replied
    The first thing to learn is to fly the airplane. No matter, fly the airplane. Controlled impact with terrain is survivable. Loss of control is not. They fly fine inverted. No worries mate.
    I know many pilots who have flown through crashes. You can meet them at Oshkosh the last week in July.
    As Stangfather said, no flight status,no rank, no power, no money.


    Originally posted by F15Eeagle View Post
    I have about 1800 hours in two different fighter/attack a/c. Currently I am doing staff work -- your entire career is not all flying but at least the first half has been all flying for me and then I volunteered for staff as a change of pace.

    Okay here is the condensed version -- realize it has been 14 years since I went through basic flying training)

    Basic requirements
    1) First and foremost must be a commissioned officer - sources: USAF Academy (or cross-commission from other service academies); ROTC, and OTS
    a) Strong GPA from college
    b) Perform well in the pilot, nav section of the AFOQT (Air Force Officer Qualifying Test) and BAT (Basic Aptitude Test) - (very important to do well on these tests)
    2) Medically pass Class I Flying Physical
    a) Eyesight 20/70 or better but correctable to 20/20
    b) No heart problems (heart murmurs, etc.)
    3) Civilian flying experience does help
    4) Eventually, possess a SECRET clearance or higher - depends on platform (cannot have questionable actions in your past that would preclude you from getting a clearance or it would seriously limit your options)
    5) Need to stay committed on grades and do well performance-wise

    Okay, you're now accepted to pilot training, now what?
    1) Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) (used to be T-37 but now T-6)
    2) Advanced Flying Training (AFT) (T-38 for fighter/bomber track, T-1's for heavies)
    3) Formal Training Unit (FTU) on specfic platform (F-15's, F-16's, etc)
    a) Dont forget Land and Water Survial Training and Centrifuge Training (high-G a/c)
    4) Arrive at your tactical squadron you're ready to go BUT you must undergo a Combat Mission Ready checkout (similar to a probationary period)

    Granted you can "Washout" anytime from UPT to your FTU. I have seen former classmates go for a variety or reasons - aptitude/performance are the leading contenders, though. I've even seen folks who performed well but puked everytime they went up in a jet. Others could not handle the G's in a fighter and pass the centrifuge test.

    Now you are deployable 2-3 years later from UPT as a Wingman - but you are just beginning the learning process

    As a Wingman you fly and learn tactics - need about 500 hours to start upgrades (waiverable down to 300 hour in some fighter units)

    Then you have upgrades (I can only speak to a fighter track)
    - 2-ship flight lead, 4-ship flight lead, instructor pilot, mission commander and then USAF Weapons School

    It takes about 2-3 assignments to get all of this accomplished after your initial pilot training which covers your commitment (can't remember if it is now 8 or 10 years after earning your Wings)

    Bottomline, if you enjoy the profession then a commitment is just administrative. Combat flying can be described as very calm/quiet followed by short periods of a highly intense adrenaline rush. It is very dynamic with a variety of issues thrown at you all at once--fun but dangerous. You need to stay focused, remember your training, control the situation on your terms and be flexible. Remember the enemy gets a vote, too.

    Hope this helps.

    V/r
    Last edited by marshaldan; 05-15-2007, 01:27 PM. Reason: Forgot; oldtimer`s syndrome.

    Leave a comment:


  • jpoe20
    replied
    hey, i'm in the ROTC right now and soon will be going through the pilot selection process. let me tell you it is a very long process.

    first off, in regards to the person talking about someone dropping out of pilot training to go into security forces, there are lots of people that decide its just not for them. some just drop out of the process because it can be difficult.

    as for the selection process, it depends on how your going into the AF. I can give you some info for the ROTC aspect, but i'm not fully knowledgeable on OTS.

    If you go through the ROTC, it requires a variety of things. 1 is the AFOQT(Air Force Officer Qualifying Test). I believe you need a minimum score of 20 for pilot and ?15? for navigator. however, combined, those two scores must sum up to 50. If you really want to be competitive, you'll need scores in the 70's. the biggest part of the selection is your commanders ranking(how you rank in your detachment). really get involved and get to know the NCO's and your commanders/aerospace professors. the rest is just random tests that you'll eventually take(you'll here more about these). Thats all I can really tell you. Hope this helps.

    -jpoe
    Last edited by jpoe20; 05-07-2007, 04:27 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • stangfather
    replied
    Originally posted by Kokoro View Post
    I've been in the AF for nearly 13 years. 8 of which I spent in SF before I crosstrained to aerial refueling. I can tell you this, I seriously doubt that your Lt. chose to go to SF. Ecspecially, if he was in pilot training. I'm with pilots all the time now and I don't know of one that would willingly have gone to that career field. I'm not saying SF is bad, I spent quite a while there and have no regrets, I just feel that your Lt may be covering up his washout.
    x2


    in the AF, if an officer doesnt wear a flightsuit, they are a second class citizen..and their promotions will take a hell of alot longer..

    kinda like how us grunts and MP's look down on the cooks and such in the Army..lol

    Leave a comment:


  • F15Eeagle
    replied
    AF pilot requirements

    I have about 1800 hours in two different fighter/attack a/c. Currently I am doing staff work -- your entire career is not all flying but at least the first half has been all flying for me and then I volunteered for staff as a change of pace.

    Okay here is the condensed version -- realize it has been 14 years since I went through basic flying training)

    Basic requirements
    1) First and foremost must be a commissioned officer - sources: USAF Academy (or cross-commission from other service academies); ROTC, and OTS
    a) Strong GPA from college
    b) Perform well in the pilot, nav section of the AFOQT (Air Force Officer Qualifying Test) and BAT (Basic Aptitude Test) - (very important to do well on these tests)
    2) Medically pass Class I Flying Physical
    a) Eyesight 20/70 or better but correctable to 20/20
    b) No heart problems (heart murmurs, etc.)
    3) Civilian flying experience does help
    4) Eventually, possess a SECRET clearance or higher - depends on platform (cannot have questionable actions in your past that would preclude you from getting a clearance or it would seriously limit your options)
    5) Need to stay committed on grades and do well performance-wise

    Okay, you're now accepted to pilot training, now what?
    1) Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) (used to be T-37 but now T-6)
    2) Advanced Flying Training (AFT) (T-38 for fighter/bomber track, T-1's for heavies)
    3) Formal Training Unit (FTU) on specfic platform (F-15's, F-16's, etc)
    a) Dont forget Land and Water Survial Training and Centrifuge Training (high-G a/c)
    4) Arrive at your tactical squadron you're ready to go BUT you must undergo a Combat Mission Ready checkout (similar to a probationary period)

    Granted you can "Washout" anytime from UPT to your FTU. I have seen former classmates go for a variety or reasons - aptitude/performance are the leading contenders, though. I've even seen folks who performed well but puked everytime they went up in a jet. Others could not handle the G's in a fighter and pass the centrifuge test.

    Now you are deployable 2-3 years later from UPT as a Wingman - but you are just beginning the learning process

    As a Wingman you fly and learn tactics - need about 500 hours to start upgrades (waiverable down to 300 hour in some fighter units)

    Then you have upgrades (I can only speak to a fighter track)
    - 2-ship flight lead, 4-ship flight lead, instructor pilot, mission commander and then USAF Weapons School

    It takes about 2-3 assignments to get all of this accomplished after your initial pilot training which covers your commitment (can't remember if it is now 8 or 10 years after earning your Wings)

    Bottomline, if you enjoy the profession then a commitment is just administrative. Combat flying can be described as very calm/quiet followed by short periods of a highly intense adrenaline rush. It is very dynamic with a variety of issues thrown at you all at once--fun but dangerous. You need to stay focused, remember your training, control the situation on your terms and be flexible. Remember the enemy gets a vote, too.

    Hope this helps.

    V/r

    Leave a comment:


  • wpipes
    replied
    As a Deputy and Former SF groundpounder. i agree w/ the above postings. either you may possibly be fresh to the career field to realize your LT is full of monkey slinging material or he is just a little Dee Dee Dee.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kokoro
    replied
    I've been in the AF for nearly 13 years. 8 of which I spent in SF before I crosstrained to aerial refueling. I can tell you this, I seriously doubt that your Lt. chose to go to SF. Ecspecially, if he was in pilot training. I'm with pilots all the time now and I don't know of one that would willingly have gone to that career field. I'm not saying SF is bad, I spent quite a while there and have no regrets, I just feel that your Lt may be covering up his washout.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by moorejam
    my Lt was originally commisioned to become a pilot. He was flying the T-6 trainers for a little while but decided to become a cop like a lot of us in the AF.
    why on earth would anyone leave being a pilot for SF of all things? Either he really didnt make it and was forced into SF or he didn't know any better, lol.

    Leave a comment:


  • SA13
    replied
    Originally posted by moorejam
    . . . my Lt was originally commisioned to become a pilot. He was flying the T-6 trainers for a little while but decided to become a cop like a lot of us in the AF.
    I spent more than a decade in the USAF as an O, and I know lots of pilots. I also know lots of people who went to pilot training and didn't finish. I have never met one that just "decided" to do something other than flying. Every single one I know that went but didn't finish "washed out," ie, despite wanting to stay and be pilots they were unable to successfully complete the program and were forced to leave.

    Leave a comment:


  • moorejam
    replied
    I have someone you can talk to!

    I am currently a Sevurity Forces Member(MP) for th USAF and my Lt was originally commisioned to become a pilot. He was flying the T-6 trainers for a little while but decided to become a cop like a lot of us in the AF. If you could send me an e-mail through officer.com then we could talk a little more on the subject and I could get you an e-mail address for my Lt as well. He is the type of person who likes to help people out. I hope that I can help as well... Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Stewie
    replied
    I'm allergic to Google, but thanks. =)

    Leave a comment:


  • Bearcat357
    replied
    Google should be your friend......

    Googling "Air Force Pilot Requirements" I found this ROTC site that has what you need to do......in less than 10 seconds.....

    http://www.csus.edu/afrotc/pilot.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Stewie
    replied
    Originally posted by DMAN95
    college degree, commisioning program (ROTC, Air Force Acadamey, OTS), 8 year service commitment for active duty not sure resreves. not to mention frequent deployments, good pay, silly looking jump suit you have to wear.
    Very good thank you!

    Leave a comment:


  • roces95
    replied
    Go to www.military.com and check out the forums there.
    Last edited by roces95; 04-04-2007, 06:04 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • DMAN95
    replied
    college degree, commisioning program (ROTC, Air Force Acadamey, OTS), 8 year service commitment for active duty not sure resreves. not to mention frequent deployments, good pay, silly looking jump suit you have to wear.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stewie
    started a topic Any Air Force here?

    Any Air Force here?

    I was curious what it takes to become a AF Pilot? I know you have to work your *** off to get there, but how is the selection done?

    Thanks

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