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  • Army MP...

    How managable is your career as an army MP. From what people tell me, if your over 21 (which I am) and have college credits (which I have) and you do well in the army you can take charge of what you do. Like criminal investigations, SRT, K9, ect. Because I wouldnt want to end up standing guard in front of a building on Iraq for 5 years. I mean I
    "For he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain: for he is the minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil." ~ Romans 13:4

  • #2
    You career in the military in general is what you make it. While having that stuff will help you in the long run there is a difference between Civilian LE and Military LE. Trying to cross into other aspects like K9 or investigations is a application process there has to be the slots availble and you have to meet the criteria. SRT is a base thing every unit has it's own criteria depending on what they look for. But bottom line your career is what you make of it and you only get what you put into.
    Professionalism always, courtesy until it's time not to be.

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    • #3
      If you go Army MP, you won't be standing at a building in Iraq guarding it. More likely than not you would be part of the Sheriff's Patrol. Basically, Sheriff's Patrol drives on the main highways with 3 M1114's or 1 ASV and 2 1114's and responds to incidents on the highway, such as IED strikes, small arms attacks, and so on. It's not really police work, its more or less a prescence patrol or first responder job. The Sheriff's Patrols get into the poo quite often. Hope this helps, but don't be discouraged by this. I'm not an MP, I just have a lot of interaction with them on the road. I am sure there is an MP on the board that could fill you in a lot better.

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      • #4
        How big crimes does MP investigate in U.S?
        I mean that if there

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        • #5
          Most unit level invetigators investigate minor crimes ie theft, robberies, burglary, etc. Depending on local policy they may or may not investigate some drugs cases however eacho services investigative branch OSI,CID, NCIS handle anything that would be considered felonies or captial cases. This agencies would investigate murders, suicides, drug offenses, terrorism, sex crimes, etc. However some MP/SF investigators do assist these agencies.
          Professionalism always, courtesy until it's time not to be.

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          • #6
            ...

            my army recruiter is an MP and he investigated a murder of a US diplomate or something. The MPs worked with the local police but because the murder took place on the base it was pretty much up to the Army. *shrug*

            I guess from what he said is it depends on where you work. some bases have highways that go through them and some are real small.
            "For he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain: for he is the minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil." ~ Romans 13:4

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            • #7
              Unless you plan on going overseas, you wont be doing any base patrol. The mission has been turned over to Department of the army civilian police who will be fulfilling the roles that the MP's had at one time. Also all the specialities such as SRT, traffic and investigations will be turned over to civilians. CID handles everything that would be considered felonies and they do have civilians but they mainly handle procurment fraud.
              I don't answer recruitment messages....

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              • #8
                Ok well it depeneds on where you go there are still some post's that MP's do LE duties Ft Hood is one of them but they work with the DA Police. I will tell you what your age and all that doesnt really matter in the MP Corps. College credits ok they are promotion points do you have a degree? As far as SRT and MPI, and K9 those are all schools you apply for once your in. For the most part you have to be an E4 first. But if you want to be an MP you will more than likely be what im doing right now sitting in Iraq for my 2nd year long tour. This time we are training Iraqi Police Officers and getting there stations running like they should which is a challenge in its self. Its not all bad we are having a lot of fun here but just realize that being an MP you will be in Iraq unless you are one of the lucky few. Hope that gives you a little insight you want to know any more let me know.
                Dedication gets you to the door, commitment gets your through it

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                • #9
                  Being an Army MP for almost 6 years active duty, and now being a civilian police officer I can tell you that they are alot different. If you want to do law enforcement, I would look more into civilian law enforcement. The reason is that the Military Police has many missions, and you don't get to decide what you are going to be doing. If you are lucky enough to get into a LE unit then fine, but do realize that this does not happen too often, especially now with so many instalations going more to DOD police. More than likely you will be in Iraq and doing security, or convoy escort, you could even end up doing corrections in a prison. The MP stands for Multi Purpose, believe me.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by aikido kid
                    my army recruiter is an MP and he investigated a murder of a US diplomate or something. The MPs worked with the local police but because the murder took place on the base it was pretty much up to the Army. *shrug*

                    I guess from what he said is it depends on where you work. some bases have highways that go through them and some are real small.
                    Jurisdiction and Authority for Military Police.

                    Military Police derive thier authority from the Garrison Commander and the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). All areas of a military bases fall under the "Special Maritime and Territorial Jusrisdiction of the United States" and Military Policeman are authorized to enforce Military and Federal Law in these areas. State Traffic Codes are also enforced, but they are "assimilated" into Federal Code (I cannot remeber the Code section). If an Interstate, US Route, or State Road run through the base then they are called concurrent jurisdiction areas which means that the Military Police and Civilian Agencies are allowed to enforce laws in those areas. Military Police may be restricted from those areas by policies enacted by the Garrison Commander or the Provost Marshal.

                    As I said earlier, Military Policeman derive thier authority from the Garrison Commander and the UCMJ. This authority only applies while they are on duty. When off duty they only have the authority granted to them by their Rank. All Officers and NCO's (Noncommisssioned Officers) have the power to apprehend a military member for violations of the UCMJ. This does not mean that he can physically restrain someone, but he can order them to report to thier commander or to the Military Police. Failing to do so would result in more charges.

                    Military Police Investigators are Military Policeman or Corrections Officers that have been detailed to investigate lesser crimes, such as minor thefts and assaults. Any major incident must be offered to CID (Criminal Investigation Command) and they can decide to either take the case or kick it back to MPI. A murder would be investigated by CID Agents. They have 48 hours with the case or it must be offered to the FBI. CID Agents are mostly military members. If memory serves OSI (Air Force Office of Special Investigations) is also mostly military members. NCIS (Naval Criminal Investigative Service) is made up entirely of civilians. Marine Corps CID is the same as Army MPI.

                    What you do in the Army will largely depend on where you are stationed. With the amount of operational commitments that the Military Police Corps have many security and law enforcement duties are being completed by civilians, so expect to do the other missions of the Military Police.
                    No man is justified in doing evil on the grounds of expediency. - Theodore Roosevelt, The Strenuous Life: Essays and Addresses (1900)

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                    • #11
                      Being a former MP from 1994 to 2004, I can tell you that you really don't have a choice in what you do. I was in a line unit, which is combat support, as a Escort Guard unit, and our primary mission was Enemy Prisoner of War transport. In 2002, I FINALLY got to do patrol because I was moved to a garrison unit. Since I had got out for a while and was a civilian cop and a former Detective, that is the ONLY reason they moved me into MPI in 2003. I did that for a year and got word there was going to be some major changes and the DOD police were taking over and most of us were going back to line units and deploying to Iraq. So I got out and went back to the reserves and got back in REAL law enforcement. There is a major difference between Military LEO and civilian LEO. I joined to be an MP until I was 21, but I was to short at the time so I went infantry and if it weren't for my father, who was an Sergeant Major at the time, I would have never got transfered into the MP's. I just wanted to be a cop so bad that I joined to do it in the Army. It did give me a great resume but I would never go back as an active duty MP unless you want to patrol the desert because more than likely, that is all you will do.
                      "In God we trust, all others we run NCIC"

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