Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

AF Reserve/ANG Drill

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • AF Reserve/ANG Drill

    Hello all. I've been giving serious consideration to trying to get a spot in a local Security Forces unit with either the AF Reserve or the Air National Guard. I've already spoken to a couple of recruiters and have some basic info. However, I'm curious about what SF units do during a typical drill weekend. I've searched the forum for answers but haven't been able to find anything specific. If it's already been posted somewhere that I've missed, a link would be very helpful. Otherwise, any insight anyone can offer would be most appreciated. Thank you.

  • #2
    I orginally enlisted into an AFRC unit. The unit did nothing on its drill weekends, with the exception of the LE flight who would get there early to man the gate. I couldnt stand it and requested orders for active duty and ended up staying active for 2 years.

    Each unit is run differently. If your on a base with an active squadron, you will work along side them, same at an AFRC base such as Westover.
    I don't answer recruitment messages....

    Comment


    • #3
      439th SFS is the reserve unit (Westover), and 104th SFS is the ANG unit (Barnes). Both bases seem rather active...Westover definitely is. I just wonder if that level of activity is present in the SF units. I am concerned about precisely what you describe, doing a whole lot of nothing during the weekend drill.

      Comment


      • #4
        Somebody I went to BMT/SP school with was out of Westover. Pretty much since Westover is an AFRC base, you will be working alongside the ART's (full time reserve guys) and the DoD police. Whatever you enlist as, I can tell you that you will spend sometime on the flightline and maybe gates. I know Westover calls the Mass state police for bs alot because of the base policies. The person I knew left and ended up back at Lackland under orders.
        I don't answer recruitment messages....

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the info and for the prompt replies. I guess I'm just very mystified by the whole part-time service concept right now. I was on active duty in the Marines for just shy of 5 years (extended a 4 year contract to deploy), and I know how very little we actually did while in garrison. I was in artillery, and other than the 2 or 3 shoots we'd have each year, we would just sit around the shop and inventory our gear over and over, conduct "training" (staring glassy-eyed at a powerpoint on some random topic), or go to our barracks rooms and "clean" (nap) until afternoon formation.

          When I deployed to Iraq I ran into a few active duty SF airmen and struck up conversations on a few occasions. It seemed like a pretty decent MOS from what they described. However, like I said, they were active duty. I have no experience with any reserve or guard units and don't know anyone that's in such a unit, so I'm trying to figure out what the heck they do on the weekends. I think I get the annual training, and I'm all for the deployments, but the monthly drills have me boggled.

          Comment


          • #6
            You can always be an ART (Air Reserve Technician) which is a civil service job but work full time in uniform as a base cop.
            I don't answer recruitment messages....

            Comment


            • #7
              My time in the Reserves meant playing Army and bad mouthing the Army at the same time.
              Be safe, watch their hands and always check your "6"

              Comment


              • #8
                The unit I was in sounds similar to you Marine time. Saturday we had a morning meeting to go over the proposed schedule for the weekend. We'd normally get everything done for the weekend by the end of the day on Saturday. After work we'd go out and get hammered. Sunday morning everyone sat around with a hangover until the Shopette opened at 10. Then we'd go get Gatorade and nurse ourselves back to somewhat human form again. After that the building would empty out as people went about their business of hiding someplace on the base. We'd normally get back to the unit at about 1400 and get released to go home.

                They did try to have us working with the permanent base police, but that didn't last long because the person running it was an idiot. They had some good ideas about training, but again the people running the show for the most part weren't too knowledgeable and the programs fell apart. With the way the unit was organized there were a lot of people with very little experience, except different schools. The senior leadership for teh most part fell into two categories, those who had a lot of time in but not much rank and those who had a little time in and didn't have a civilian job for a long time after getting out. I was in right after the downsizing of the early 90's so a lot of people who were idiots on active duty and couldn't make rank were forced out and went into the reserves. Because of the "wealth of knowledge and experience" these people brought they were promoted quickly. Nobody stopped to think that these were the idiots on active duty. The people who had time after they got out of the military did mandays and attended training for several months. This allowed people with very little experience but a lot of book knowledge to be the only people qualified for promotion. The end result was we had people who knew the book but didn't have the skills and people who should have had the skills and knowledge but were idiots running the show. It made for a very badly run organization. There were about three or four good leaders in the unit who knew the job and had the ability to do the job, but the rest "couldn't poor urine out of a boot with the instructions written on the heel."
                But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new guards for their future security.

                For the intelectually challenged: If the government screws the people enough, it is the right and responsibility of the people to revolt and form a new government.

                Comment

                MR300x250 Tablet

                Collapse

                What's Going On

                Collapse

                There are currently 4900 users online. 255 members and 4645 guests.

                Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                Welcome Ad

                Collapse
                Working...
                X