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RoboCop prototype: Beta version 1.0

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  • RoboCop prototype: Beta version 1.0

    Watch this video. Now tell me: given how fast technology is moving, how hard would it be to train it to make an arrest or use deadly force??

    Or have it operated by a human remotely, just like drones are....

    Twenty years from now, there may no longer be police academies of police officers. Just machines that respond by autonomous vehicles to accidents and incidents.

    God help us.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=LikxFZZO2sk
    People don't leave bad jobs, they leave bad bosses.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Ratatatat View Post
    Watch this video. Now tell me: given how fast technology is moving, how hard would it be to train it to make an arrest or use deadly force??

    Or have it operated by a human remotely, just like drones are....

    Twenty years from now, there may no longer be police academies of police officers. Just machines that respond by autonomous vehicles to accidents and incidents.

    God help us.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=LikxFZZO2sk
    Don’t count human cops out just yet. We may be reduced in the near future to machine-augmented cyborgs with only parts of our human body still left (like this: https://www.clipzui.com/video/r4y315...413o484k4.html), but at least we’d still be eligible to be employable and draw a pension at retirement.

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    • #3
      Dude, we are still driving gas powered cars and using firearms designed in the 1950s. This is light years down the road.

      No one will pay for these.
      Now go home and get your shine box!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
        Dude, we are still driving gas powered cars and using firearms designed in the 1950s. This is light years down the road.

        No one will pay for these.
        Now this is where we disagree. I think the economics are exactly what will propel this....


        Allow me to explain by first asking how much an average officer costs. Let's assume a hire-on age of 25, at a cost of $100,000 per year for salary and benefits. Assuming a thirty year career, and not including increases in wages and health care costs, that alone is $3,000,000. Add in health care for life and retirement contributions or an annuity (I know many places no longer offer such but many still do) for another 20 years plus increases in wages/health care during the career, I offer a conservative estimate of $4mil per officer is what the average agency shells out in the long run.

        Now lets assume this company mass produces bouncy robot guy and gets the cost down to $2mil per unit. Seems like an expensive purchase, yes, but when you consider the only additional cost is paying someone a low wage to operate remotely (assuming AI technology hasn't evolved, which it is by leaps and bounds) and a technician to replace the CPU whenever a bad guy unloads a 30 round magazine into a bot. Plus no more sick days, vacation days, or down time other than having to occasionally charge up the battery pack. I submit that bureaucrats will heartily embrace the long-term savings and the taxpayers will quickly adjust to police services provided by machines when they watch their tax bills drop.

        I read an article a couple of years ago that predicted re-animation technology was 10-15 years away and soon the day will come when a corpse could be removed from cyrogenic storage, hooked up to a machine that pumps in warm goop and fires neurons in the brain, and shazam, the dead is talking and blinking its eyes again. The company working on the technology was largely unconcerned with any ethical questions that one might have about awakening a deceased soul and said their motivation was purely financial: people of the future would be willing to pay money so their relatives could unfreeze them 50 years after natural death and roll them out to join in Thanksgiving dinners and Bar Mitzvahs. The same basic frame of thought may be the driving force behind real RoboCops of the future....


        People don't leave bad jobs, they leave bad bosses.

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        • #5
          That’s long term costs. No one really looks at that. Even if they did and said “hey! Today let’s blow the next couple years budget and totally replace our police force with Robocops.”

          Somewhere, someone, will say the programming is inherently bias and unable to adapt to the unpredictable nature of human beings. THEN someone is is also going to say, “f*ck these machines. I am a human being and I have rights! Like the right to be policed by a person. A person who understands me, feels what I feel, knows what it is like when their kids don’t listen to them or when the husband is a couch surfer during Sunday football”

          and bingo, Robocop gets relegated to guarding a fixed post that has little human contact.

          We arent going away. Saving money is only part of the equation.
          semper destravit

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          • RGDS
            RGDS commented
            Editing a comment
            Wars are already fought by machines. I agree they will take over more of the direct action elements of warfare.

            That R2D2 looking security robot that exists now has already had major complaints that its software is bias against homeless people. https://m.sfgate.com/news/media/SF-S...er-1146327.php

            2025 isn’t far enough off to fix the problem.

          • RGDS
            RGDS commented
            Editing a comment
            I bet these things get used as overnight security guards.

          • Ratatatat
            Ratatatat commented
            Editing a comment
            I submit that San Francisco is not, and will never be, a suitable place for any application of policing innovation, much less police technology innovation.

          • RGDS
            RGDS commented
            Editing a comment
            ^^^^^^

            Don’t tell them that. The SF Police Commission has held off on taser allowance because they were looking at newer more innovative less harmful forms of less lethal weapons....I mean tools.

        • #6
          These things are becoming more advanced every day. There are actually currently international committees considering whether there should be treaties banning the use of military drones that can decide to fire without the input of a human operator! We're probably looking at the potential for a fully-autonomous robot soldier in 10-15 years...it's only a matter of time before this technology expands into the civilian world.

          I suspect that we'll see some department use some kind of automated enforcement drone in the next 20-30 years, if not sooner. At the very least, a department will see the benefit of them as a kind of "force multiplier" instead of hiring human cops...create a kind of "patrol algorithm" where they can patrol without human input, then have a remote human operator available when they detect something that needs intervention.
          "He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you."
          -Friedrich Nietzsche

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