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Belt Keeper Technology Help

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  • Belt Keeper Technology Help

    I know that belt keepers in LE have traditionally always been a leather strap with snap or velcro holding technology. However as a deputy myself, I realized how dated this technology is last summer when I was in a hurry to respond after using the bathroom. Struggling to feed the keepers back through the inner belt can sometimes be tricky. I thought there has got to be a more efficient way. I know it's not the end of the world, but when you get that priority call when your in the bathroom seconds may count. Female officers struggle with the issue even more than males, as some of my coworkers refuse to go to the bathroom on shift. DPS workers have to quickly install and remove gear as they switch hats from police to fire. Personally, I experimented with velcro and was not impressed and still needed belt keepers. Here's my solution and I would appreciate some feedback.

    I started a company and came up with a patent-pending product that will be hitting the market in the spring of 2018. My product is a completely aftermarket belt keeper system for leather or nylon belts that attaches your 2.25" duty belt to your garrison belt magnetically. In a demo, I was able to remove my duty belt with magnetic belt keepers and securely reattach it in seconds. And yes, I said securely. The magnets along with the belt tension keep the belts locked together just as good as the old leather straps. The magnetic keepers replace traditional keepers. My product also solves some other issues I've seen posted. The keepers limit gear from sliding down your belt when removed and allow you to stick your belt to most bathroom stall and locker doors to keep it off of unsanitary floors.

    Now here is where I need some feedback. I know that my 135 member department is excited about the product, but I would appreciate more input from the community. I am struggling with how much inventory I need for product launch demand, so tell me if it is something you would purchase. I'm also curious on what fellow officers would pay for an American made product like this assembled and packaged by law enforcement officers. MSRP should be around $50 for a set of 4, but some say that's too much, as traditional keepers are $20 to $35. Incidentally, these same people won't hesitate to spend $50 to $200 for any other LE gadget or knife that comes along. Nevertheless, I think it will be marketed for about $40-$45 initially. I look forward to your feedback on this issue. Thanks for your time.

  • #2
    So is it just belt keepers that are secured with magnets instead of snaps? Got any photos of the system so we can get a better idea of how it works?

    Comment


    • #3
      I'll stick to my current $4.95 set of nylon snap keepers.
      Getting shot hurts! Don't under estimate the power of live ammo. A .22LR can kill you! I personally feel that it's best to avoid being shot by any caliber. Your vest may stop the bullet, but you'll still get a nice bruise or other injury to remember the experience.

      Comment


      • #4
        No, it is not just magnets in place of snaps. Each keeper has 2 parts and is composed of very thin black metal. They are hollowed out on the outside of the duty belt to let the basketweave appearance shine through. The duty belt piece contains the magnet facing inward towards the body. The second piece bites the inner garrison pants belt and is also black metal. It is shaped to allow it to pass through belt loops of most pants. This piece securely traps/locks the magnet and keeps it from sliding. The tension of a snug fitting belt keeps the magnet locked in the trap around your waste. Both parts stay with each belt when removed and should always line up when changing pants and belts. I can post some pictures in the near future.

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        • #5
          I do like my $5 system of snaps
          Former Police Officer (Injured LOD)
          USAF VETERAN 2004-2012
          "The sheep pretend the wolf will never come, but the sheepdog lives for that day."-LTC Grossman
          Emergency Services Dispatcher, APG MD

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Wa11eye22 View Post
            I know that belt keepers in LE have traditionally always been a leather strap with snap or velcro holding technology. However as a deputy myself, I realized how dated this technology is last summer when I was in a hurry to respond after using the bathroom. Struggling to feed the keepers back through the inner belt can sometimes be tricky. I thought there has got to be a more efficient way. I know it's not the end of the world, but when you get that priority call when your in the bathroom seconds may count. Female officers struggle with the issue even more than males, as some of my coworkers refuse to go to the bathroom on shift. DPS workers have to quickly install and remove gear as they switch hats from police to fire. Personally, I experimented with velcro and was not impressed and still needed belt keepers. Here's my solution and I would appreciate some feedback.

            I started a company and came up with a patent-pending product that will be hitting the market in the spring of 2018. My product is a completely aftermarket belt keeper system for leather or nylon belts that attaches your 2.25" duty belt to your garrison belt magnetically. In a demo, I was able to remove my duty belt with magnetic belt keepers and securely reattach it in seconds. And yes, I said securely. The magnets along with the belt tension keep the belts locked together just as good as the old leather straps. The magnetic keepers replace traditional keepers. My product also solves some other issues I've seen posted. The keepers limit gear from sliding down your belt when removed and allow you to stick your belt to most bathroom stall and locker doors to keep it off of unsanitary floors.

            Now here is where I need some feedback. I know that my 135 member department is excited about the product, but I would appreciate more input from the community. I am struggling with how much inventory I need for product launch demand, so tell me if it is something you would purchase. I'm also curious on what fellow officers would pay for an American made product like this assembled and packaged by law enforcement officers. MSRP should be around $50 for a set of 4, but some say that's too much, as traditional keepers are $20 to $35. Incidentally, these same people won't hesitate to spend $50 to $200 for any other LE gadget or knife that comes along. Nevertheless, I think it will be marketed for about $40-$45 initially. I look forward to your feedback on this issue. Thanks for your time.

            It sounds like a neat idea and I can see how it would have some advantages over traditional keepers.

            But would I run out and buy it/order it? Probably not. I've managed 23 years without this product and will probably finish my career without it. I haven't had anyone die on me yet because I struggled with some snaps after using the bathroom.

            I do believe in supporting LEO-owned and run businesses...but $50 seems very steep. Even $40 to $45 is too much. I don't think I've ever seen traditional keepers that were more than $20 for a set of four. Nylon ones are about $5, and even nice leather ones are only about $10 to $15.


            Comment


            • #7
              Oddly enough, i agree with you to a degree. My quartermaster showed me she pays $32 for a set of 4 leather blk basket weave with hidden snaps. I have seen the ebay sales of about $20 for these, so no doubt my department is getting taken. I have also seen belt keepers with these powerful magnets facing out for you to stick guns, cuffs, knives to in a bind in order to switch to hands on. These products contain powerful mighty magnets that aren't dirt cheap. Yet one of these sells for $30. My product essentially 4 of those plus the inner belt locks and a snap ring for keys to clip to. If you flip them around, external suspenders can be attached. Another product called magnetuck uses button sized magnets to keep your shirt tucked in and also sells for $30. I'm not in any way arguing with you as I would probably say the same thing if this wasn't my idea! I've often looked at new product improvements with a similar thought process. It was when I researched marketing and pricing strategies based on manufacturing costs where I began to understand retail pricing with a different appreciation. I thank you for your perspective and taking the time to provide me with feedback. It sounds like you're beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel with your career. Be safe brother!

              Comment


              • #8
                Safariland Slotted Belt Keeper - Model 63 Keeper has slots for inner belt.

                Comment


                • Wa11eye22
                  Wa11eye22 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Safariland 63 sells for $6+ each which would be about $30 for a set of 4.

              • #9
                Have you researched long term magnetic and the human body’s response? This is something to be looked at since you are introducing a magnetic field at the waist level for extended periods of time.
                Now go home and get your shine box!

                Comment


                • Wa11eye22
                  Wa11eye22 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Yes, I have spent considerable time researching this as it was one of my original concerns. There is not a huge amount of concrete scientific data. There is information to support that magnetic fields have a positive effect on the body, and many bracelets or ankle bands are sold annually supporting this. However, since the magnet locks to the inner belt metal, the field is greatly reduced and distorted. Add to this your garrison belt the back metal piece of the lock clip, the waistband of pants, tucked in shirt, undershirt, etc. And very little is reaching your body anyway. While these magnets are super strong, the power of their field goes down exponentially with every 1/8". I know it is not the right terminology, but the magnetic field almost grounds out and reduces to nothing when attached to the metal locks. Who knows what the medical and scientific research will say 10 years from now though?!

                • HI629
                  HI629 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I’m still blaming the magnets in my wallet for making my butt grow so big!

              • #10
                Originally posted by Seventy2002 View Post
                Safariland Slotted Belt Keeper - Model 63 Keeper has slots for inner belt.
                What black magic is this?!?
                1*

                Comment


                • #11
                  Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
                  Have you researched long term magnetic and the human body’s response? This is something to be looked at since you are introducing a magnetic field at the waist level for extended periods of time.
                  I was going to suggest wearing tinfoil boxers...but lo and behold, a British company already invented radiation-blocking underwear. They were designed to shield mens nuts from cellphone radiation, but they should protect from any magnetic field.

                  https://spartanunderwear.com/en/home/

                  http://www.independent.co.uk/news/bu...-a7949101.html

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Originally posted by Wa11eye22 View Post
                    Oddly enough, i agree with you to a degree. My quartermaster showed me she pays $32 for a set of 4 leather blk basket weave with hidden snaps. I have seen the ebay sales of about $20 for these, so no doubt my department is getting taken. I have also seen belt keepers with these powerful magnets facing out for you to stick guns, cuffs, knives to in a bind in order to switch to hands on. These products contain powerful mighty magnets that aren't dirt cheap. Yet one of these sells for $30. My product essentially 4 of those plus the inner belt locks and a snap ring for keys to clip to. If you flip them around, external suspenders can be attached. Another product called magnetuck uses button sized magnets to keep your shirt tucked in and also sells for $30. I'm not in any way arguing with you as I would probably say the same thing if this wasn't my idea! I've often looked at new product improvements with a similar thought process. It was when I researched marketing and pricing strategies based on manufacturing costs where I began to understand retail pricing with a different appreciation. I thank you for your perspective and taking the time to provide me with feedback. It sounds like you're beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel with your career. Be safe brother!
                    That makes sense. But it's also why you may be running into problems with your price point. The price may be perfectly reasonable from your company's point of view (as far as manufacturing and other costs and profit margin). But the consumer may deem it overpriced based on the product's overall benefits compared to traditional options. If there is too large of a gap between what is reasonable to you and what is reasonable to the consumer then the product won't sell.

                    Here's a thought: Have you considered pitching your product to one of the well-established companies that sell LE gear? If they're interested in your product they might either 1) buy your patent, or 2) manufacture and market your product and pay you a small portion for each item sold. I figure they already have everything in place as far as manufacturing, marketing, online sales, etc. They would be able to keep costs much lower than your start-up could...which would translate to a more reasonable price for consumers.

                    In any event, I wish you the best in your endeavors!

                    PS: As far as seeing the light at the end of the tunnel with my career...I'm a glutton for punishment. Every time I get close to the light I decide to add to the tunnel instead.


                    Comment


                    • #13
                      I have considered licensing the product and that still may be an option. I went about it several different ways with Safariland, but they must receive thousands of ideas annually. I have received no response from them until last week, at which point my attorney pretty much scared me away from the idea and reccomended trying to market the product myself initially. A crystal ball would be very helpful with this!

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        They thought cellphones were benign.
                        Now go home and get your shine box!

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          The magnetic strip on my wife's credit card makes my money disappear.

                          Comment


                          • Wa11eye22
                            Wa11eye22 commented
                            Editing a comment
                            In testing it did not interfere with radio, taser, cell phone, or any other gear. I suppose it could if you put the magnet right to the credit card, but again if properly connected the magnetic field should be limited.

                          • HI629
                            HI629 commented
                            Editing a comment
                            It’s a joke. The magnetic strip ON THE CREDIT CARD makes the money disappear. In other words, the wife using the credit card costs him money!

                          • Wa11eye22
                            Wa11eye22 commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Ha! Totally missed the joke! I suppose I have the same problem with my wife! Was too busy processing the potential for the magnets to clear the strip in the card. One of my other concerns was pace makers, but again, the magnets would have to be inside of about 6 inches and aimed right at it, which should never happen in normal use. Magnetic interference is only temporary and the pace maker would resume normal operation if the magnetic field is removed, but again the field would be facing toward the officer wearing it and "drowned" out by the locks.

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